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Gary Ward
111 followers -
Author, Educator and International speaker on the human body in motion
Author, Educator and International speaker on the human body in motion

111 followers
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Our AiM 2015 schedule:
Dublin
San Francisco
New York
London
Bristol
Toronto

Fingers crossed we can squeeze a couple more in
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Love this quote!

Rest in peace

#robinwilliams  
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Here's an article I was asked to write for Physio Hub in Australia. Thank you for asking Sarah Flanagan and for liking it enough to share on your site 

It was inspired by the people I surround myself with, the people I work with and many who I am lucky enough to teach.

#Whatthefoot
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Strong thought process established today as to what this information tells us about the pelvic floor...
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It's not necessarily training harder that makes you stronger, your quality of movement and efficiency in that movement will generate instant gains - effortlessly (even after three weeks off)...
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2014-07-27
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Gait is mass management. How we walk is influenced by how we are set up to manage our mass. In this image, notice how when the right foot is taken off the ground the centre of pressure which has a dance like relationship with the centre of mass scuttles into the safety of the left foot support and as the left foot's time on the ground comes to an end, it darts across to the safe haven of the right foot as it meets the ground. All of that requires motion in three dimensions at each joint to be optimal if your motion is to be fluid and effortless. #whatthefoot
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Feet. How they are set up to start your day will dictate the movement quality you experience throughout your day.... 
#whatthefoot  
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If you have read the What The Foot? book then you'll be aware of how we like to use a force pressure platform. Here's a little example of how the stabilometry chart can highlight somebody's problems. 

What you see in the image is the person's centre of mass hovering backwards, venturing out leftwards and anterior and rightward and anterior, but never purely anterior! Since the pelvis pretty much follows the path of the centre of mass, it also suggests that what you see in the image is the person's pelvis hovering backwards, venturing leftwards and anterior and rightwards and anterior, but never purely anterior! 

Muscles lengthen before they contract: 
As the pelvis wobbles away from it's central resting position during the 60 seconds of the scan, the muscles that the pelvis leans into contract eccentrically to control the wayward motion of the pelvis - you can hopefully see as the dots move toward the edge of the circle that muscles in that area will be lengthening (see second image) - and contract concentrically to drive the pelvis back toward the middle. 

This patient presented with bilateral TFL pain and a pubic symphysis that was way out of alignment. The Centre of Mass and pelvic motion clearly moves anteriorly into the TFL muscles on both sides and shows that the body is clearly reluctant to venture forwards and put pressure on the malaligned pubis.... 

A pubis correction and a reorganisation of how the body moves to bring the awareness back to the psoas and the abdominal tissues on the front line of the body (those which are stimulated when the body falls anteriorly) and the patient rapidly moved herself out of pain...   #whatthefoot  

Find out more at our next UK based course later in 2014  
London 
Level One - October 10th, 11th and 12th 
Level Two - November 7th, 8th and 9th 

As always please email chris@anatomyinmotion.co.uk for more information
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2014-07-22
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Poor Mans Foot Scan (PMFS): a popular way for AiM students to get into the three dimensional posture of our clients... #whatthefoot  
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Client came to see me in Guernsey last week with a diagnosed prolapsed disc at L5/S1. Symptoms are low back pain and some referral down the leg. Because the pain is not running fully down the leg, the surgeon is unwilling to operate but has no further suggestions to help her since the second epidural failed to offer any relief…

Client stands with her pelvis both shifted and rotated to the left, standing more on her left leg than her right. I watched her walk: she simply exaggerates this motion accessing more of her stance posture, reaching with the left foot and leaning to the right. At Anatomy in Motion I have a process called ‘interviewing the body’ where we put the client into positions relative to the Flow Motion Model to see if we can find a comfortable space for her to occupy. Even though I ‘want’ to put her into the opposite stance to show her body what it’s been missing – i.e. pelvis shifting to the right –  her brain feels more comfortable by going further into the posture that she already occupies instance and gait. It would appear that she has chosen this position and pattern as one which relieves (or hides away) her actual symptoms whilst at the same time causing a new one that she is currently experiencing! Her history goes all the way back to a cervical disc bulge in 1999. I moved her into and through the position that makes her feel comfortable,exaggerating the movement, following the check points relative to the gait phase, aware that in essence I am lengthening her ‘long’ muscles more to teach them to contract her back towards center. I rechecked her posture, and sure enough she was no longer shifting to the left or rotated left, but dead straight. Awesome! She instantly reported a new score of zero for pain in thelow back but a score TWICE that of the original low back discomfort now in her left shoulder and neck on the side of the original disc bulge. Taking away the ‘safe’ posture exposed a WORSE pain in her neck that matched the original neck disc issue of 15 years ago. Aren’t our bodies AMAZING at covering up our past history…?Sleeping dogs….

Now her body was balanced so I thought I would muscle test her neck and upper trap to see what relationships I could find. Sure enough, the upper trap, when activated inhibited the neck muscles and she began using her jaw to find stability in her neck instead.

I retested the neck with a left shift in the jaw and her neck muscles tested strong. Her normal everyday jaw pattern isa dominant rightward motion, that is clearly stuffing things up for her.  A manual release of her mandibular muscles and all of her jaw cracking and popping disappeared with a renewed manner to how she opened and closed the jaw (think from coke habit gurning to more normal open and closure).  It seems the jaw was over active not just for the shoulder but also for the whole neck which is what the upper shoulder muscle was over working for in the first place so as to protect the 15 year old neck injury. With all neck muscles active, the shoulder pain simply dropped away.

The final point that she could feel when standing up was a point on the left side of the sacrum, close to the original pain point which we found to be inhibiting her left hand side QL, this is the side that her walking and stance posture never offers the chance to shorten and this QL was thus locked long and inhibited full time.

At last I was able to comfortably place the client right leg forwards to re-educate her system and finally get that right leg to bear some weight and begin to explore a space that she has avoided for years. Left shift phase and right suspension phase completely changed her gait.That poor little right leg was shaking so bad from the effort….

She looked at me and asked:
“Is it possible for pain to completely disappear… just like that?”
“Are you feeling pain now?”
“No, I’m not”
“Then my dear, I would have to say that YES it is completely possible”

#whatthefoot  

Love my trips to Guernsey…

www.whatthefoot.co.uk/courses
Finding Centre Course:
London - October 10, 11, 12 & November 7, 8, 9 2014
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