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Gary Gauthier
Worked at LandMark Publications
Attended Harvard Law School
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Gary Gauthier

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STRANGER THAN FICTION: A paroled felon who had been convicted of armed bank robbery scores a role in a movie using a pseudonym. He plays a deranged abortion clinic doctor in the production. It is a low-budget horror movie produced at a cost of $8,000.

A news story about the film runs in a local paper. In the story is a photograph which includes a likeness of the deranged doctor. As luck would have it authorities read the article and the felon, who plays the doctor, is in violation of the conditions of his parole.

Production was just about wrapped up when U. S. Marshals show up at the scene of the final shoot to nab the suspect. He was made to return his costume before being taken to jail.
He was playing a villain in the low-budget slasher
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A computer algorithm can translate from one language to another using a statistical model based on a large data set.

The computer doesn’t know anything about words and their meaning — it starts without a conventional grammar or dictionary. But it doesn’t need those. Instead, it uses pure brute force to spot the correspondence between words.  

When I first heard about this approach, it sounded ludicrous. This statistical model throws away nearly everything we know about language. There’s no concept of subjects, predicates or objects, none of what we usually think of as the structure of language. And the models don’t try to figure out anything about the meaning (whatever that is) of the sentence either.

 Despite all this, an IBM team found this approach worked much better than systems based on sophisticated linguistic concepts. Indeed, their system was so successful that the best modern systems for language translation — systems like Google Translate — are based on similar ideas.
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The Intel team designed something which comes close to reading Hawking's thoughts. It learns the way he likes to construct his sentences and adapts itself to his habits of "speech" and now it needs only one or two letters in a word or phrase before predicting the rest. It even factors in his grammatical fastidiousness and his resistance to new technologies. As Hawking points out, all this mind-reading technology is still relatively primitive, "but I think the development of full artificial intelligence could spell the end of the human race."
Stephen Hawking last year warned that AI could lead to the end of the human race
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Researchers wondered whether high-level management could be automated. They created a sample project and directed software to execute the job (prepare a research report) and were amazed by the quality of the end result — and the speed with which it was produced.

"Is it possible to sit down at a laptop, launch iCEO, and ‘code’ the preparation of a project worthy of a Fortune 50 company into existence — without needing anyone to act as the project’s manager?” And somewhat surprisingly, that answer is yes.

"The corporate structure was created around the tools we had back in the 18th century to maximize scale while minimizing transaction costs. Now that structure is being disrupted by the advent of technologies which can accomplish many (if not most) of the projects we associate with corporations."

"In the debate around automation, several voices have argued that management tasks are so creative that they’re unlikely to be automated any time soon. During the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, a similar argument was made about detailed craft work."


  #AI , #management
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A computer science degree gives a student the best chance of graduating with a job and a high starting salary. Every year approximately 100,000 computer science  jobs go unfilled because of a shortage of workers. The graduates don't exist because the vast majority of schools don't teach this skill.

In 2013, Washington state sparked a national movement by passing legislation to allow high school computer-science courses to count for graduation.

 #computerScience
Public schools should teach computer science — it’s a skill set all employers need.
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"Authors are seen as rather serene, noble characters, licking their pencils, perpetually looking out the window for inspiration – which always comes floating in a bubble – picking beautiful sentences out of the air like passing butterflies, which they trap and affix decoratively to the page. If only it were like that.

"It cannot be denied that being a writer has a lot of compensations. . . . Writers get to lay out their vision of the world. They are held in popular esteem, it is true. And they control their own time to a far greater extent than most wage slaves. Staring out the window also certainly comes into it – a lot.

"However, writing novels for a living is hard – unimaginably hard, for those who have not tried it.  As perfectionists, we always fall well short of our goals. We have the whole weight of literature standing behind us, mocking us with greatness and shadowing us into insignificance.  Writing is not a choice, it is a calling.
A new poll reveals that 60% of Britons long to be an author. It can be a good life, for sure – but could they handle the insecurity, loneliness and paranoia?
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Gary Gauthier

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The aim of the The Novella Award is to celebrate a literary form that contains such classics as Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea and Anthony Burgess’s A Clockwork Orange, and by encouraging shorter fiction it bucks the current trend for hefty novels.

The (word count) formula will be controversial, not least because it suggests that some famous winners of novel prizes are not novels, after all. Towards the shorter end of the fiction scale, nobody seems to agree about length.

The shortest work of literature is attributed to Hemingway, who was reportedly bet that he couldn’t write a complete story in 10 words. He could do better than that, he countered, offering this: “For sale: baby shoes, never worn.”
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What does the “end of work” mean, exactly? It does not mean the imminence of total unemployment, nor is the U.S. remotely likely to face 30 percent unemployment within the next decade. Rather, technology could exert a slow but continual downward pressure on the value and availability of work—that is, on wages (the real wages of recent college graduates have fallen by 7.7 percent since 2000) and on the share of prime-age workers with full-time jobs. Eventually, by degrees, that could create a new normal, where the expectation that work will be a central feature of adult life dissipates for a significant portion of society.

The signs so far are murky and suggestive. The most fundamental and wrenching job restructurings and contractions tend to happen during recessions: we’ll know more after the next couple of downturns.

The paradox of work is that many people hate their jobs, but they are considerably more miserable doing nothing. As late as the mid-19th century, though, the modern concept of “unemployment” didn’t exist in the United States. Most people lived on farms.

Today, the most-common occupations in the United States are retail salesperson, cashier, food and beverage server, and office clerk. Together, these four jobs employ 15.4 million people—nearly 10 percent of the labor force.

Technology creates some jobs too, but the creative half of creative destruction is easily overstated. Nine out of 10 workers today are in occupations that existed 100 years ago, and just 5 percent of the jobs generated between 1993 and 2013 came from “high tech” sectors like computing, software, and telecommunications. Our newest industries tend to be the most labor-efficient.
For centuries, experts have predicted that machines would make workers obsolete. That moment may finally be arriving. Could that be a good thing?
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"I showed a set of anonymized engineering resumes to about 150 engineers, recruiters, and hiring managers and asked one question: Would you interview this candidate? It turned out that not only did both recruiters and engineers largely fail at predicting who the strong candidates were, but, much more importantly, no one could even agree on what a strong candidate looked like in the first place.

"Things that were commonly included on resumes at various times (and still are in certain cultures) — a photo, marital status, age, religion, height, weight, blood type, and political affiliation — are no longer en vogue, and it’s certainly not inconceivable that, in the future, asking for a resume will seem just as silly as these now-outdated practices.
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The remains of the father of the  modern novel are found. "Cervantes is most often remembered for Don Quixote, which gave the world the word quixotic in acknowledgment of its central character and his adventures, including his joust with windmills. The expression tilting at windmills also denotes people who take on imaginary adversaries."
Spanish investigators said they had reason to believe that bones found at the Convent of the Discalced Trinitarians were those of the “Don Quixote” author.
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How do you feel about "basic science research" that has no immediate or foreseeable application?  It took nearly four decades for Einstein's theory behind lasers to develop to the point where an actual laser was built.

Current applications of laser technology include: barcode scanners, laser eye surgery, and DVD electronics.
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Public utilities provide services that cater to "basic" necessities, such as water, electricity, and natural gas. These companies are regulated. Has the internet become a basic necessity whose provider needs to be regulated? The FCC is expected to propose rules that classify the internet as a utility to "ensure that no content is blocked and no so-called pay-to-play fast lanes exist." Wireless data services may also be included.

There is no word yet on whether the proposal will call for more transparent consumer contracts and improved customer service from the providers.
Tom Wheeler, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, is expected to propose reclassifying high-speed Internet as a telecommunications service.
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Work
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Employment
  • LandMark Publications
    Publisher, 2011
  • Little eBook Classics
    Author, 2011
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Male
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Introduction
Gary is working on his first novel. He runs a publishing company.

If you're an artist, techie or writer, add him to one of your circles.
Education
  • Harvard Law School
    1986 - 1989
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