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Gary Arndt
Works at Everything-Everywhere.com
Attended Macalester College
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Gary Arndt

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The Global Travel Conspiracy, Episode 9 – It’s A Wild Wild Wild Kingdom

This week’s guest is +Stephanie Arne, an educator, speaker and host of Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom. We talk about her encounters around the world with wildlife, how she got into the business of wildlife education and how she got a personal nickname from Snoop Dogg.

http://everything-everywhere.com/2015/08/28/the-global-travel-conspiracy-episode-9-its-a-wild-wild-wild-kingdom/
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North American National Park #51: Fundy, New Brunswick

Fundy is located on the Southeastern coast of New Brunswick and is located on the Bay of Fundy, for which it is named. The Bay of Fundy is home to the highest tides in the world, and in the park you can actually walk on the ocean floor during low tide.

In addition to the sights along coast, Fundy also has many amazing attractions in its interior as well. The photo above is of Dickson Falls, which is one of several waterfalls in the park. Inside the park you will also find miles of hiking trails, a golf course, and a saltwater swimming pool. There is also a very photogenic covered bridge at Point Wolfe.

The environment is similar to what you might find in Northern Maine or in Acadia National Park in United States. Heavily forested with a rugged coast. The landscape and environment is very different from Kouchibouguac National Park, which is 2 hours away in New Brunswick, but is not on the Bay of Fundy. According to the data, Fundy gets more visitors than Kouchibouguac, but it doesn’t feel that way because the park is larger and it doesn’t have beaches.

The park is easily accessible by car from all the major cities in New Brunswick: Fredericton, St. John, and Moncton. Route 114 goes through the park and that is the highway you need to get on to visit.

If you are driving from Moncton, you will probably also want to stop at Hopewell Rocks, which is a provincial park about halfway between Fundy and Moncton. Hopewell actually gets far more tourists than Fundy, because it is at Hopewell where you can best see the dramatic change in the tides. In most places on the Bay of Fundy, the tide goes out a very long distance, but you can’t get a real sense of the height of the tides. At Hopewell, there are free standing rocks which give you a better sense of scale.

Camping is available in the park, including oTENTiks available for rent. These are permanent tents with wood floors which can be found in many Parks Canada locations. The nearest town is Alma, which is literally outside the northern border of the park on route 114. There are a few hotels in town which cater to park visitors.

http://everything-everywhere.com/2015/08/26/north-american-national-park-51-fundy-new-brunswick/
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haha,it's so beautiful,I like it
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North American National Park #48: Kouchibouguac, New Brunswick

Kouchibouguac National Park lies on the eastern shore of the province of New Brunswick. At 239 sq/km (92 sq/mi) the park is a mix of barrier islands, forest, salt marshes and beaches. It is much more of a recreational park than a nature reserve. I visited in August of 2015 and the park was very busy with what mostly seemed like visitors from New Brunswick, Quebec and Nova Scotia.

The park is easily accessible and is located 90 minutes from Moncton on Highway 11.

Camping is available in the park, but there are also hotels available in the nearby towns of Rexton and Miramichi. The park isn’t very big, especially when you compare it to the size of western parks. You can easily explore most of the park in a single day. There are hiking trails available through the park, but those too can be hiked in a day a do not require any serious backcountry hiking.

http://everything-everywhere.com/2015/08/24/north-american-national-park-48-kouchibouguac-new-brunswick/
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Hi
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Global Travel Conspiracy, Episode 8 – Food and Law

My guest this week is +Jodi Ettenberg, a former lawyer turned travel writer. We talk about food and its relationship to travel, and many other things. 

http://everything-everywhere.com/2015/08/21/global-travel-conspiracy-episode-8-food-and-law/
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A Pair of Rockhopper Penguins on New Island, Falkland Islands

I found the Falklands to be second only to South Georgia Island in terms of penguin observing. There are several species of penguin on the Falklands. In the few days we were there we saw rockhoppers, gentoos, kings and magellanic penguins.

In addition to the penguins, you can find many other species of seabirds including albatrosses and blue eyed cormorants. It is also a fantastic place to watch male elephant seals fight during breeding season.

http://everything-everywhere.com/2015/08/20/a-pair-of-rockhopper-penguins-on-new-island-falkland-islands/
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c'est où comme sa
 ·  Translate
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A Mangrove Tree in Caroni Swamp National Park, Trinidad

Located just outside the capital of Port-of-Spain, the Caroni Swamp is the home to a large number of scarlet ibis’. They live in the Caroni Mangrove Swamp, where you can view the ibis’ as they fly back to their nests in the evening. It is something I recommend to everyone who visits the island of Trinidad, and it is very accessible and easy to do from the capital.


http://everything-everywhere.com/2015/08/22/a-mangrove-tree-in-caroni-swamp-national-park-trinidad/
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In god i trust i tins her gret.
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Beehive Domes in Purnululu National Park, Western Australia

Most visitors to Australia stick to the east coast of the country. While there are many great things to see in the east, I think some of the best attractions are actually in Western Australia.

The Bungle Bungle mountains in Purnululu National Park is a park that doesn’t get a lot of visitors. It is very remote, requiring hours of driving from the nearest major city, which is Darwin in the Northern Territory. Once you get to Turkey Creek (which is nothing more than a gas station), it is another 4 hours, off-road to get to the park.

The reward is well worth the effort, however. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a place even few Australians have visited. The most famous feature are the beehive domes, which is actually a result of coloration on the surface of the rocks. There are also some very dramatic chasms in the park, which makes it a real treat for photographers.

http://everything-everywhere.com/2015/08/13/beehive-domes-in-purnululu-national-park-western-australia/
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Wonderful
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North American National Park #50: Prince Edward Island National Park

Prince Edward Island National Park is one of the smallest national parks in Canada, at only 22 sq/km in size. It is located on the north shore of Prince Edward Island and is divided into 3 separate parts: Cavendish in the west, Brackley-Dalvay in the center, and Greenwich in the east.

The most popular segment of the park is the central part which pretty much a really long beach. I visited on a weekday in August and I couldn’t find a parking spot along this segment. It seemed like most of PEI had come out to enjoy the beach. Even though the air temperature was warm, the water temperature was still pretty cold, as the water was part of the northern Atlantic. Most people were on the beach and not out swimming.

The easternmost segment of the park, Greenwich, is very different. Here you will find more nature and fewer people. There are several trails which will let you see different coastal ecosystems in a very small area, including forests, salt marshes and sand dunes.

Visiting PEI National Park is very easy if you are on the island. It is approximately a 30 minute drive from the capital of Charlottetown and about a 2 hour drive from Moncton, NB, including the drive over the Confederation Bridge.

Camping is available at the park and there are a great many hotels on the island in easy driving distance.

http://everything-everywhere.com/2015/08/25/north-american-national-park-50-prince-edward-island-national-park/
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very nice
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The Town Hall in the City of Bamberg, Germany

Located in Bavaria on the Regnitz river, Bamberg is one of UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Germany and is considered one of the best towns in Germany for beer. It is also one of the few places where you can find original half-timber buildings from before WWII.

The Town Hall (Rathaus) is probably the most distinctive building in Bamberg. Located on an island in the river, it is the signature attraction in a town full of very photogenic places.

http://everything-everywhere.com/2015/08/23/the-town-hall-in-the-city-of-bamberg-germany/
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In 1488 they had to borrow money from the local Baron to construct their home in the middle of the river. It was the first house in history to be built with a bridge loan. 
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Low Tide on the Wadden Sea Near Bremerhaven, Germany

The Wadden Sea is a world heritage site which is located in the North Sea off the coast of the Netherlands and Germany. What makes the sea unique are the large mud flats which appear at low tide. Near Bremerhaven, you can walk out for kilometers during low tide. In fact, they have created poles you can climb in case you are stranded too far out once the tide comes in.

I’ve been to the Wadden Sea several times, but I found Bremerhaven to be the best place to visit. They have an excellent visitor center and really shows how the area changes with the tides.

http://everything-everywhere.com/2015/08/19/low-tide-on-the-wadden-sea-near-bremerhaven-germany/
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Unnatural beauty 
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21st Century Mona Lisa

Fun Fact: 25% of the people who visit the Louvre go directly to the Mona Lisa…..and leave.

The Mona Lisa is probably the best known painting in the world and one of the most underwhelming things you’ll ever see in person. Its much smaller than most people think and when you are in the room it is almost certain that you’ll be crushed by a sea of people all trying to position themselves and take photos with their smartphone or tablet.


http://everything-everywhere.com/2015/08/21/21st-century-mona-lisa/
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That is kind of a sad fact.
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Frozen Boathouse in Lake Minnewanka, Banff National Park, Alberta

Camera NIKON D300S
ISO 640
Focal Length 26mm
Aperture f/6.3
Exposure Time 1/5000

Banff is Canada’s most popular national park with over 4,000,000 visitors per year. However, the vast majority of them visit during the summer months. During the winter the park is just as, if not more stunning.

Visiting the park during the winter isn’t really that challenging. The roads are plowed, so driving around is easy. There is usually room vacancies so long as you aren’t at one of the ski resorts. Lake Louise has an ice rink on the lake where you can skate or play hockey (it is Canada after all).

http://everything-everywhere.com/2015/08/14/frozen-boathouse-in-lake-minnewanka-banff-national-park-alberta/
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cool
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Education
  • Macalester College
    Mathematics, Economics & Political Science, 1987 - 1991
  • University of Minnesota
    Geology & Geophysics, 2004 - 2006
Basic Information
Gender
Male
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Friends, Dating, A relationship, Networking
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Other names
Space Cowboy, Gangster of Love, Maurice
Story
Tagline
2014 SATW Travel Photographer of the Year, 2013 NATJA Travel Photographer of the Year
Introduction
My name is Gary Arndt.

I have spent the better part of the last decade traveling around the world. 

In March 2007 I sold my house and have been traveling around the world ever since. Since I started traveling, I have probably done and seen more than I have in the rest of my life combined.

So far I have visited over 170 countries and territories , all 50 US states, every Canadian province, every Australian state and territory, over 100 US National Park Service sites and over 290 UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

I have also:


I wasn’t always a world traveler. Other than occasional summer vacations, my family didn’t travel very much. I grew up in Wisconsin and never saw salt water until I was 21 years old. In 1998 I sold my business to a multinational corporation and they sent me on a whirlwind 3 week tour of their offices in January 1999. I visited Japan, Taiwan, Singapore, France, Germany, Belgium and the UK.

That trip stuck with me for years. I made a few other international trips after that to the Bahamas, Iceland and Argentina, but never really made a commitment to travel.

In 2004 I decided to go back to school and study geology. After seeing the hell that PhD students were going through, the idea of going to graduate school became very unappealing.

I decided to travel around the world.

It took about 2 years for me to tie up all the loose ends I had and sell my house. Finally, on March 13, 2007 I turned over the keys to my home.

I thought I’d be traveling for a year or maybe two. So far it has been over 8 years with no end in sight!

Bragging rights
2014 Travel Photographer of the Year
Work
Occupation
Traveler, Photographer, Blogger
Skills
Arriving in foreign countries with no money and no plans.
Employment
  • Everything-Everywhere.com
    Traveler, Photographer, Blogger, 2006 - present
  • Creative Internet Solutions
    CEO, 1994 - 1998
  • Stomped.com
    CEO, 1999 - 2003
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
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Everywhere