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Gary Andrews
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Gary Andrews

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Not trying to jump on a bandwagon here, but #thedress  got me thinking about news values in an internet-led news cycle...
Who would have thought a debate over the colour of a dress would become the most important news item of the day. Somewhere, in Fictional Character World, Kent Brockman and Ron Burgandy are high-fiving each other. By the end of the day, it felt if news organisations knew they'd gone beyond parody and embraced #thedress's ridiculousness. Whether that's a good thing is another question. ~casual reminder that #TheDress happened becau...
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Gary Andrews

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Discipline, 007, discpline. Another outing for the Oddjob Pod, this time on plane, boats, cars and... skis. Yes, it's Bond's best chases.
 
I'm joined by +Gary Andrews and +Graham Sibley to discuss the myriad James Bond chases on the new edition of the Oddjob Pod.
Gary, Terry and Graham are back for another episode of the OddJob Pod. This time around we're reflecting on our favourite chases, Whether it be tuk-tuking through Rajasthan, moon buggying through Nevada are skiing off a cliff...
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Gary Andrews

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Found this really interesting - if you're a business that sells yourself on your social expertise, having a slew of fake followers could pose a reputational issue.
How do you remove fake Twitter followers? Practical help on how to remove fake Twitter followers using tools such as Tweepi and Fake Follower Check.
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From the work blog: some very level headed advice on a subject I've had a lot of discussions with freelancer friends on.
 
"Being self-employed can make increasing your prices seem scary. But aligning your prices with the market and competitors is important."

Daunted by the idea of putting your prices up? +Emma Cossey shares her tips on how to raise your rates and maintain a smooth working relationship with your clients.
If you're a freelancer or contractor and you need to raise your prices, informing your clients can be a delicate act. Here's some tips on softening the news
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A quick piece from me on the BBC's #priceofootball  report - and why comparing Bristol Rovers to Barcelona and Cheltenham to Manchester City is a pointless exercise, but one of the real questions has been missed.
#149698171 / gettyimages.com Today saw the now annual BBC Price of Football report released. It's always an interesting snapshot of where the game is and taps into a wider feeling of the growin
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Gary Andrews

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Delighted to have +Sue Llewellyn as the +Hiscox UK media columnist. Her first piece is sound advice on why so many social media campaigns fail - a lack of planning.
Hiscox's media columnist Sue Llewellyn asks why so many companies launch into a social media journey without spending time mapping out their route.
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Kim Kardashian tried to #breaktheinternet  last week. Brands attempting to jump on the meme nearly broke me. Here's my plea for them to stop, really please stop, trying to feel they have to do a funny or leap onto every piece of trending conversation on social.
I blame Oreo. Insofar as the slightly over-sugared chocolate biscuit can even be blamed for anything, the company's wildly successful piece of photoshop work on Twitter during the Superbowl two years
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I love your posts, I must say. Keep it up, please  : ) 
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This is one of my favourite pieces we've published recently. One one of my colleagues asked me if I knew how the back of Rod Stewart's head related to photography and image rights, this was always going to be the end result...
 
Hiscox's Samantha Newman highlights how a recent copyright case involving Rod Stewart shows why SMEs need due diligence over image rights.

http://www.hiscox.co.uk/business-blog/features/professional-indemnity-insurance-prevent-major-headache/
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There's been quite a bit of conversation around football on the BBC's Price of Football survey. Would be interested to hear your thoughts on the report, whether that's the issues raised of prices across the divisions here and abroad through to the methodology behind the report itself.

To kick it off, here's a very quick piece from me on why comparing the likes of Bristol Rovers to Barcelona, price-wise, is a fairly pointless exercise.
#149698171 / gettyimages.com Today saw the now annual BBC Price of Football report released. It's always an interesting snapshot of where the game is and taps into a wider feeling of the growin
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Between Barnet, FC Halifax Town, Torquay, Bristol Rovers, Gateshead, Woking, Wrexham and Kidderminster, it's going to be a tight promotion race in the Conference. Here's my take on it for When Saturday Comes.
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How were Channel 4's experiments with Snapchat and WhatsApp as news delivery platforms. I tested our their #indyref  coverage.
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Have him in circles
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Journalism. Content marketing. Social media.. A spot of sport blogging and podcasting on the side
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Cast your mind back to your teenage years. Your parents are late and have left you to make your own dinner. What ends up on the plate is a mixture of chicken, chocolate, crisps and maple syrup. Now think of a more adult version of this. How much you enjoy Duck & Waffle very much depends on how much you've grown up. Given D&W sits in the middle of the City, it seems somewhat appropriate. In a way, it's a strange dichotomy. Food that positions itself as grown up and sophisticated but catering to the big kid with a sweet tooth, in one of the most stunning locations in London. Sipping cocktails 40 floors up is quite an experience. So is the food, although not quite in the same way. There's no faulting the decor or the service though. From the glass lift ride (that will soon show up anyone with a fear of heights) through to the bar, it's sheer elegance and the views from the top of Heron Tower are breathtaking. Sure, you could pay to go up the Shard, but will they also serve you a cocktails that involves setting fire to a piece of whiskey soaked oak on your table? I think not. And the staff have been trained to perfection - friendly without being too overly familiar. There's an excellent customer service ethos that others would do well to follow. If this were just a fancy cocktail bar with food, it may edge to five stars. But it's not. It's a restaurant. And one with decidedly mixed food. The menu is a marriage of sweet and savoury. Foie gras creme brulee, the signature duck and waffle. You get the idea. Chef Daniel Doherty clearly has a sweet tooth. Sadly, mine palate is a little more bitter I fear. Many have raved about Duck and Waffle, but what I tasted was an interesting mashup of flavours that may have sounded fun of paper but I'm not entirely convinced work in execution. The spicy ox cheek doughnut, to take one example, was not spicy but was cloyingly sweet, unsure if it wanted to be a punchy meaty dish or a clever savoury desert and ending up somewhere in the middle. And I'll confess, the duck and waffle itself, which so many have raved about, never hit the high notes together. On first bite, the combination of confit duck leg, fried egg, waffle and a barely-detectable mustardy maple syrup surprised and delighted. By the fifth bite, it was becoming heavy going. By the end, my mouth was a little oily and my stomach heavy. Of the three of us who ordered the dish, one polished it off as if he'd hardly eaten for a week. The other two of us were still trying to work out if we enjoyed it by the time we reached Liverpool Street station. In fairness, as this is a 24 hour restaurant, I can see this working as a decadent brunch or a posh late night munchie (or perhaps they should just sell bags of their pigs ears at the door). But for a main meal, you may be better over choosing some of the more conservative fish options. My biggest issue with duck and waffle isn't the slightly odd approach to flavour - which I can forgive generally because, hey, at least they're trying something different. It's the fact that this is sold as a high end dining experience whereas if this was sold from a street wagon at half the price, it may possibly be one of the best ideas known to humanity. Instead, £17 for a slightly sweet main I'm still unsure about and an eye-wateringly expensive wine list makes for an experience that is certainly fun but a little too clever for its own good. As I write this, on the same evening as eating at D&W I'm eating home made pancakes to fill the gap left after the meal. Granted, I don't have the views or the flammable cocktails, but the taste of the food is pretty much the same.
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Public - 7 months ago
reviewed 7 months ago
On a balmy summer evening, sipping caiprinhas in the picturesque setting of Merton Abbey Mills, it's hard to believe this leafy area and charming independent restaurant are a few minutes walk from a giant KFC and a retail park by Colliers' Wood tube. It's not Brazil, but it's certainly not London either. This family run business has been slowly expanding since they set up in the unit selling pastels. The menu now includes a few main dishes such as black bean and pork stew and a cheesy beef and cassava bake. Service is friendly and relaxed, but there's not need to rush as this is a place you'll definitely want to linger, especially with the live music outside. The food is filling and tasty and the family are more than willing to chat about the business and the whole experience is relaxing. We went in for a quick bite and stayed the whole night. Very enjoyable.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Somewhat of a local fixture in Balham, on account of the vast beer garden - a must on a sunny day - the Devonshire is one of those grand, cavernous pubs regularly found in South London, and very pleasant it is too, although there's a few minor quibbles. The food is ok, but nothing spectacular to justify the prices. The bar staff are a little on the aloof side (or in one case, ignored a section of the bar to chat to his friends). And the fittings are slightly infuriating on your legs. Still, I can generally forgive all these things, and forgive them I generally do. It's a pleasant enough place to spend a few hours with friends, which is all you need from a pub really.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Who needs a beer garden when you can have a whole common? Nestled on the edge of Putney Common and a short walk from Barnes station is the rather lovely Spencer. If you lifted the pub away from its location, it would be a rather pleasant, if a little pricey, London pub with a tempting menu. Add in the setting and the clientele and you've got a hidden summer gem. With benches on the common and families and dogs (lots of dogs) welcome, this is the place to head if you want a relaxed drink in the sunshine that doesn't involve hordes of sun-worshopers and blasting stereos. With a country church on one side and a cricket pitch on the other, it's all very bucolic. Indeed, you'll need to take a 10 minute walk back to civilisation to convince yourself you're still in London.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
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It's hard to believe this pub is in London. By itself, it's just another quite pleasant bar but the setting by the banks of the River Wandle is what really makes this place. Charming, bucolic and buzzing without being over busy, this is one of the capital's best places for outdoor drinking. A hidden gem that's well worth exploring.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
At some point, somebody somewhere who knows a lot more about area demographics than me decided that what the lower end of Putney really decided was something to draw in a younger, hipper crowd. And so, along with a few other refurbs (the rather enjoyable Swift bar being one of them), we have the Toy Shop. Unsurprisingly, the theme is overly sweet, possibly designed to evoke memories of childhood, although in my case, it just made me feel old. In fact, all told, as somebody the wrong side of 30 and with no real sweet tooth, I'm probably the wrong target audience for this, although the general rule of thumb is show me a cocktail bar and I'll be a happy man. The sweet themed cocktails were nice, if a little too sickly for my liking - I couldn't stomach more than one. The food was decent, the service a little scatty. I have a feeling I should like it more than I do, and yet I can't escape the feeling that when your other nightlife options in the area consist of the Fez Club, this bar is in the wrong place. Given that it always seems busy, though, I'm probably wrong. Like I saw, I don't know much about urban demographic planning. Had The Toy Shop opened in Brixton or Clapham, it would have been hailed as a destination. As it is, it's very much a curiosity on the high street. To give The Toy Shop its due, the branding is strong and the bar is in absolutely no doubt of what it wants to be. It fact it's quite unique and while I wouldn't necessarily return, I'd rather Putney had another 10 individual bars like The Toy Shop that are mildly out of kilter with the area than one more generic Be At One.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Sometimes you enter a pub with a suitably lowered expectations. A combination of a long walk and desperation for a drink and a quick bite to eat meant this was convenient and, well, there. As it probably is for a lot of people being just opposite the Monument. Filled will tourists and city workers, it's not exactly quiet but it is big meaning there's not a huge wait for the bar. It's also pretty reasonable given how much pubs around the area can charge, with a decent selection of beers and spirits. The food menu is certainly a lot better than many pubs in the area as well - not often you'll find breaded halloumi sticks as a filling main on the menu - with the salads being a surprising highlight. It's not like The Monument is anything special. But if your feet are aching and you need a drink, it'll do.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago