Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Galerie Sturm
16 followers
16 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
KATALYSATOR KUNST – Kunst im Ministerium

Gruppenausstellung der Galerie
Großer Saal des Ministeriums, Bankgasse 9, 90402 Nürnberg
noch bis zum 14. August
geöffnet Mo-Fr 9 - 17 h
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Jude Griebel: Wasted

Soloshow

2 July - 16 August 2015

#art #artwork #sculpture #contemporaryart #kunst #zeitgenössischekunst #galeriesturm #judegriebel


“I love you more than all the plastic in the ocean.”
Canadian artist Jude Griebel overheard this unusual declaration of parting lovers. The statement reveals an understanding of vastness—of something sublime in its scale—that is not measured by one’s insignificance compared to the awesome forces of nature. Unlike the sublime of the oceans and mountains in Caspar David Friedrich paintings, the untenable power and unthinkable vastness the lover describes is symptomatic of contemporary patterns of consumption. Tossing away a single bottle is an afterthought, but as a collective habitual action it creates a mass in the ocean so vast that it seems to have no beginning and no end—just like romantic love.
The imperial measurement system is evidence of how long we have used our bodies to scale the unthinkable into understandable units. The body as a measurement system also applies to ideas, as seen in the classical artist’s depiction of virtues as allegorical figures. The problem with using embodied representation to give abstract concepts discrete and lively forms is the inherent assumption of a body’s stability. Bodies grow, shrink, expand and leak. They can penetrate each other’s surfaces; they can be disciplined into new shapes. And indeed the abject nature of our bodies makes them an inconsistent measuring tool.
Griebel’s series Wasted gives natural and unnatural disasters human forms, from the monstrous face of an oil spill, to a boat-headed, fish-bodied figure. These are the nasty children of the artist’s meticulously handcrafted making, as imperfect as a smelly, hairy foot is as a unit of measure. But this imperfection is no loss.
Griebel gives embodied form to natural and human-made tragedies that exist on scales often impossible to comprehend. Inspired by visits to natural history displays and eccentric collections around the world, Wasted mashes up these referents with the aesthetics of handmade grotesque props from 1980s horror films of the artist’s youth, giving form to humanity’s current anxious relationship with the environment.
In Wasted, the figures embody the abject horror of coming to terms with the Anthropocene: unlike the tidy hierarchical categories of Enlightenment thinking, in our planetary epoch we can no longer deny that the future of our species is completely and hopelessly intertwined with that of our material world, and vice versa. Griebel’s figures bring shape to this grappling with our place on the planet, their abjection reflecting the personal, psychological turmoil in attempting to rethink our place in the universe. We can no longer be like Friedrich’s Monk by the Sea contemplating God’s omnipotence in every massive ocean wave. God is dead and we killed him long ago. Instead, like Griebel’s work, we are left to see ourselves in excessive piles of fish and mounds of bottles, in a collapse of revulsion and desire.
The exhibition is accompanied by a booklet.
Jude Griebel lives and works in Montreal.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
Galerie Sturm is pleased to present the solo exhibition ‘I`ve done … questionable things’ by Malte Bruns.
‘I`ve done … questionable things’ – with this sentence the replicant Roy in the American science fiction film Blade Runner (1982)  admits to having killed people.
Attracted by the artificial film world of men-machines, their specific scene and mask images and their corresponding inventors Malte Bruns extracted his laboratory-like, fragile ‘Wunderkammer’ (The Cabinet of Wonders).
The replicants are, more perfectly designed by their creators in biogenetic composition than man himself, virtually indistinguishable from real people- so perfect that after some time they can develop emotions and empathy from memory in-plants.
This system blurs the line between man and replica (n) t and they present themselves as often more human than man himself…
In Malte Bruns video and photo work, references point to atmospheres and themes that deal in a medial way with the world of work, mechanics and machine.
His both backward-looking view of realities and innovations of the industrial revolution, and forward facing in today’s illusion techniques and animation capabilities, reflects the inventiveness and spirit of progress, where nothing is impossible.
For his installation corpus of individual video objects Malte Bruns creates a self-contained world that captures in addition to cinematic references, the cultural history of the showman, the cabinet of wonders and the panopticon.
The framing and mounting of the video works in individual pedestals and architectures strengthen these backgrounds.
The exhibition is accompanied by a booklet.
Malte Bruns lives and works in Düsseldorf.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment

Post has attachment

Post has attachment

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
Wait while more posts are being loaded