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Gaby Garro Abdykerimov
Attends Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica
Lives in Cartago, Costa Rica
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Gaby Garro Abdykerimov

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Just another SIN of the times...

#math   #geek  
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Next up, a thrilling game of hide 'n SEC.
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Gaby Garro Abdykerimov

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How Do We See Color?

This wonderful infographic explains the physics and physiology of color vision. Presented by Visian, a vision technology company.

http://visianinfo.com/coloring-our-world/
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What Gives the Morpho Butterfly Its Magnificent Blue?

What does it mean to be blue? The wings of a Morpho butterfly are some of the most brilliant structures in nature, and yet they contain no blue pigment -- they harness the physics of light at the nanoscale.

Learn more about these butterflies from producer Jenny Oh Hatfield at KQED SCIENCE and +Deep Lookhttp://goo.gl/dGo5XE

Patel Lab at UC Berkeley has ongoing research on structural color: http://goo.gl/W8vyV0
What does it mean to be blue? The wings of a Morpho butterfly are some of the most brilliant structures in nature, and yet they contain no blue pigment -- they harness the physics of light at the nanoscale.
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Quacks Like a Duck

The image below features a neuron on the left, and a simulation of large scale galaxy clusters on the right. They look somewhat similar in structure, and if the internet is to be believed, this means something. And it does. Not that the universe is alive, or the cosmos is like a giant brain, but simply that sometimes two radically different things can have similarities in structure.

I’ve been getting a lot of comments and emails lately from fans of alternative science models such as the electric universe. They typically link to a video asking for my thoughts, or simply stating that it proves “us scientists” are clearly wrong. I’ve been watching a few of them, since it’s a good way to avoid grading final exams, and I’ve noticed a common trend. I’ll call it the “if it looks like a duck” argument.

For example, there’s a recent experiment by electric universe supporters known as the SAFIRE project. The basic setup is a plasma globe (or Tesla ball) where things like voltage, current, and gas pressure can be varied. What the project shows is that there are some broad similarities between a plasma ball and the Sun. There are current hot spots, an overall surface glow, and the surrounding plasma gets hotter than the surface of the ball. The similarities are kind of interesting to see, but from them many EU supporters claim that this demonstrates the Sun is actually electrically charged. That is, the similarities show that the underlying physics must be the same.

This is a common misconception, particularly within “alternative” science. It is why you often hear arguments that one doesn’t need to get bogged down in the details (or mathematics) because the solution is so obviously clear. But physics is filled with things that are structurally similar but caused by very different underlying processes. A popular example in introductory physics is the use of water waves to demonstrate the interference of light. Water can be used to help explain the double slit experiment for light, because both water and light exhibit wave behavior. However it is completely unfounded to conclude from this that light is literally made of water.

The power of such physical analogies is that they make complex phenomena seem simple and obvious. It is why most of alternative science folks focus on videos and visual slides rather than actual research papers, and why so many people send me links to these videos as “proof” that my years of training and experience are obviously wrong.

But just as light is not made of water and galactic superclusters are not neurons, the Sun is not electric. Physical similarities are useful to explore, and they are sometimes right, but they are often wrong.
The image above features a neuron on the left, and a simulation of large scale galaxy clusters on the right. They look somewhat similar in structure, and if the internet is to be believe, this means something. And it does. Not that the universe is alive, or the cosmos is like a giant brain, but simply that sometimes two radically different things can have similarities in structure.
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Fighting Microbes with Microbes

Next generation Soil Science is being pursued that will lessen the use of pesticides, fungicides, herbicides, and even synthetic fertilizers.

"While the Human Microbiome Project has discovered that some 10,000 species of microorganisms live in and on the human body, outnumbering our own cells by ten to one, plant scientists have found that any given soil sample contains more than 30,000 taxonomic varieties of microbes. Soil microflora not only provide nutrients for plants, but also suppress disease. In exchange, roots secrete fixed carbon into the soil and feed their bacterial symbionts.

Although the medical community now warns that overprescribing antibiotics kills beneficial organisms and encourages the formation of resistant strains, a similar change in opinion has not occurred in agriculture, where a kill-all approach to plant pathogens has given rise to biocides that indiscriminately wipe out the beneficial along with the pathogenic. “Biocides can nuke the soil, but they never kill everything,” says Mike Cohen, a biologist at Sonoma State University in California. “This creates a biological vacuum that becomes filled by opportunistic survivors and organisms from the surrounding soil.” Biocides create a strong selective pressure: the few pathogens that survive face little competition and proliferate, giving rise to pathogenic communities that can evade standard treatments.

Beneficial soil organisms, however, can protect plants more selectively than biocides do. They displace pathogens and produce toxins that kill pathogenic microbes, and they also trigger plants’ own defense mechanisms. “Native bacteria are the first and most powerful barrier to prevent the establishment of pathogens,” says Jousset. “A diverse community is especially important to keeping pathogens away—this is true in the human gut and in the soil.”

Given the number of known microbes found in soil, and that each plant and each potential pest have their own complex, interconnected relationships, this will take a lot of time & work to make head-way.  But it certainly beats the alternatives of flirting with dependency on dwindling resources, or altering the evolution of ecosystems in trial & error fashion on large scales.

Full article:  http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/33703/title/Fighting-Microbes-with-Microbes/ Image/infographic:  Catherine Delphia

#soilscience   #sciencesunday   #planthealth   #microbes   #agriculture   #sustainability   #evolution  
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Great information
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Scientists identify hormone that reduces calorie burning, contributes to obesity

_The researchers conclude that reducing the production of (peripheral) serotonin by inhibition of Tph1 "may be an effective treatment for obesity and its comorbidities," and so the team is now working on a pharmacological "enzyme blocker."
Researchers from McMaster University have identified an important hormone that is elevated in obese people and contributes to obesity and diabetes by inhibiting brown fat activity.
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M8, the Lagoon Nebula

This image was obtained with the wide-field view of the Mosaic camera on the KPNO 0.9m-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. M8, the Lagoon Nebula is a giant star forming region. It is so big that it is faintly visible to the naked eye. The gas in the nebula is energized by a massive star at its center, causing the gas to glow. The dark objects within the nebula are called Bok globules, and are dense clouds of gas in which new stars are forming.
These regions are named after Bart Bok, a Dutch-American astronomer who first noticed the dark spots in regions of star formation. Bok speculated that they may be associated with the earliest stages of star formation, but hidden baby stars were only directly observed several decades later with the invention of infrared imaging.

Credit: NOAO/AURA/NSF
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Exactly what Australia needs is a hero that contradicts its discriminatory politics.
 
Gay Manager Of Sydney Cafe Died A Hero Saving Other Hostages
Whenever you hear gay men disparaged as weak and timid, tell them the story about Tori Johnson, who all of Australia is praising as a hero.
http://www.thenewcivilrightsmovement.com/uncucumbered/gay_manager_of_sydney_cafe_died_a_hero_saving_other_hostages
Via  +The Bitchy Pundit 
#sydneysiege   #glbtq   #glbti  
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Indeed! And in fact, we need this true heroism everywhere!
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10 Singleton Design Pattern based questions from Java Interviews
Singleton remains a powerful core java pattern and has its place in between Static utility class. as you said classical example is JDK itself which provides both java.lang.Math and java.lang.Runtime differently. Though Singleton seems easy many programmer mess it up when asked write code for Singleton. http://javarevisited.blogspot.com/2011/03/10-interview-questions-on-singleton.html #Java   #Programming  
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Approaching the geysers on Saturn’s moon Enceladus. 

Photographed by Cassini, 13 August 2010.
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Cartago, Costa Rica
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Alajuela, Costa Rica - Guápiles, Pococí, Limón, Costa Rica - Naryn, Kyrgyzstan
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Computer engineering student. Science and art enthusiast.
Education
  • Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica
    Computer Engineering, 2014 - present
  • Colegio Científico de Alajuela
    2012 - 2013
  • Conservatorio de Castella
    Flauta Dulce, Teatro, 2005 - 2011
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Gaby Garro