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Fraser Cain hung out with 6 people.Peter Lake, Scott Lewis, Gary Gonnella, Pamela Gay, Stuart Forman, and Ray Sanders
Virtual Star Party - May 6, 2012
Fraser Cain and 6 others participated
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Monica Mayumi's profile photoSarah Tuomala's profile photoMike Matessa's profile photoBeth Johnson's profile photo
56 comments
 
So... Dorks, Dexters, Nerds & Geeks,
Turn looking glass to sky,
beholder's watchful eye
be well at watch as once the Greeks.

Bring fateful thoughts and dreams along,
and hope for something strange.
So those who wax 'deranged'
might choke on feet forbidding they be wrong.

A song per each shine, ignoring none,
The truth, when worlds collide,
is progress must be tried
by Chance; by Self; then Death at Last of Sun.
Our angry brother, Mars, swears with him we could survive.
The human race for new frontiers is lost by fear or hesitation.
 
+Scott Lewis Did you help contain the Station Fire (as much as it could be "contained")?
 
Hey Scott, Captain/paramedic/investigator (retired) here
 
For Mount Wilson? No. But I'm kind of glad. not a huge fan of wildland fires. But I am jealous of their lookout spot in the middle of it. The 100" Hooker Telescope Dome. ;)
 
Indeed! It's one of the things I love about teaching in LA -- take students outside when discussing Edwin Hubble and pointing to the radio/TV antennae and letting them know "THERE is where he made these discoveries!"
 
When I'm doing some "sidewalk astronomy" to use the American term, Saturday is the one - to a person - that wows people. But now I know how to find the Omega Centauri glob, I look forward to stupifying people with that mindboggling sight...
 
I've read that Regulus is actually a 4-star system. Are your scopes able to pick these up?
 
Four star? Regulus is a crazy runaway star, but I've never heard of it being a multiple...
 
Is there somewhere I can see the specifications for the equipment taking these images - i'm always keen to know what equipment delivers these wonderful images - this is a virtual star party after all :-)
 
Okay, yes, it is a multiple -- 2 pairs, actually. The close companion to Regulus A has only been viewed via spectroscopy, though the surface of Regulus A has been imaged by the CHARA array.
 
Thanks... :-) I know I can find M67 by starting at Regulus and slewing west...
 
Titan Please ... I am sure you can see in your naked eyes , is it the webcam which is stopping ?
 
Titan is too faint compared to the planet. They tried overexposing Saturn earlier, but still couldn't pick up Titan. Sorry....
 
+Thad Szabo Now we realize how efficient human eye is :) It has HDR capabilities :D
 
I imagine that there are a lot of objects in the sky that are not mapped or identified. How often do you find an undocumented star or is it even important to find a new star or other object?
 
Is the Owl nebula similar to the Dumbbell nebula but viewed from the side?
 
And speaking of times zones, almost 2 a.m here and... Monday. Gonna be a hard week (bills, no $$$, etc, better not think). Thanks for the beautiful views and all the work. Love this hangouts.

Congratulation to moonmapers, more of 251,000 craters and raising!
 
I often run movies through Virtual Dub to get them to a codec that Registax likes. Virtual Dub is freeware!
Moo Cow
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Just wanted to let you guys know, I have been powering through all of the Astronomy Cast episodes.... it took almost 5 months of my commuting to school and back (two hours every day), but I finally got all caught up yesterday. It was fantastic! I do have a question that was never answered, though, can I ask it here or should I wait until tomorrow's hangout? :)
 
Thank you all for sharing! Gorgeous views as always… I especially enjoyed the globe-ular clusters :-)
Moo Cow
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Well dang, guess it's too late now :/
 
Just ask here in comments... I can answer.
 
I'm curious as to this unanswered question myself
 
Thank you everyone for showing up! I'm still around perusing the comments as well. +Thad Szabo is another phenomenal resources to have.
Moo Cow
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Alright.... It's not really pertaining to the star party at all, though. As a forensic anthropology student, I am pretty darn fascinated with how things decompose. We've heard a lot about what would happen to a live body out in the vacuum of space, but do we know what happens to not-so-live bodies? Like, would putrefaction still occur?
 
+Moo Cow Mostly just dessication. With no air pressure, water boils out of a system pretty quickly (I do this demo for my classes, though not with any organic tissue...)
 
(Bump1)
So... Dorks, Dexters, Nerds & Geeks,
Turn looking glass to sky,
beholder's watchful eye
be well at watch as once the Greeks.

Bring fateful thoughts and dreams along,
and hope for something strange.
So those who wax 'deranged'
might choke on feet forbidding they be wrong.

A song per each shine, ignoring none,
The truth, when worlds collide,
is progress must be tried
by Chance; by Self; then Death at Last of Sun.
Our angry brother, Mars, swears with him we could survive.
The human race for new frontiers is lost by fear or hesitation.
Moo Cow
 
So no bacterial activity? Well that's disappointing. I was hoping I was gonna have a sweet idea for an ISS experiment :D
 
Bacteria can be amazingly resilient, though. Some hitched a ride on one of the Explorer landers on the Moon, and when Apollo astronauts returned it to Earth, the bacteria could be revived.
 
+Sarah Madero Vacuum bell jar -- put some water in a beaker, let students feel the water first to confirm it's at room temperature. Pump out the air and let them watch the water boil for a while. Then, let them feel it again and show that the water is now quite cold.
Moo Cow
 
That's what I had thought, and figured that they could probably generate enough of their own heat to maybe keep going, but I imagine that lack of moisture would inhibit them as well. Thanks for the help ^_^
 
Unfortunately, due to the square-cube law, they lose their heat really quickly do to their small size.
 
But that same law still has Jupiter giving off more heat than it gets from the Sun, even 4.6 billion years after it formed.
 
*due to -- been making that mistake a lot recently :-P
Moo Cow
 
So we'd need Jupiter sized bacteria for putrefaction to be possible. Got it. :D
 
Sorry I missed it. Watching the YouTube recording now though.
 
One of these days I'll make it onto one of these Hangouts. I always see them, but the time zone difference never helps.
 
Great party again. I always watch it the following morning due to time difference. Keep up the great work and I wish I could join in with my setup.
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