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Day 3 of the Google+ Communities 30-day Challenge

My intention to focus the majority of my efforts participating in Communities continues...

You won't see many of my posts today if you look through my profile because I've been experimenting with Private Communities. Don't worry, it's just a phase.

- I've seen a lot of Communities run by Brand Pages and not Personal Profiles. I think this is a mistake. They're more likely to be absent landlords, and the Communities will go all Lord of the Flies. I could be wrong, but I'm finding it's harder to connect with Brand Pages. There's nobody home.

- Private communities are awesome. Find them and join them. If somebody invited me to a private community and I didn't respond, I apologize, I've got invite blindness right now.

- I'm hearing from Community moderators that members can be abusive and threaten legal action when their posts are moderated. It would be nice for Google to provide some kind of policy and even a legal team who can intercept this stuff on our behalf. Come on Google, summon your legal team to protect your Communities.

- I created a Private Community for the Owners of Large Communities. If you're the owner a Public Community with more than about 500 people, drop me a note, link to your community and I'll send you an invite. Apparently, we're already writing a book. Chances are I already invited you, but you didn't see the invite because you've got invite blindness too. 

- I wrote up a Moderator guidelines document and sent it to my current moderators for the Space Community. I also posted it within the Community Moderators community.

- The only person who +mentioned me to join their community was +Margie Hearron  at Women of Color. Needless to say, as a white Canadian man, I don't have a lot to offer, but I'll bring the value as best I can.

Join me, spend the next 30 days posting mostly to Communities. See if your enjoyment of Google+ improves.
Galarza's Internet Marketing Services's profile photoLocal Internet Marketing's profile photoAnna Phommatham's profile photoABel. Tchilumbo's profile photo
I've been spending quite a bit of my time going through the communities I joined when they all first came out. Luckily all the ones I joined are still going strong. I'm slowly starting to like communities the more I use them.
I agree private communities are pretty awesome! Thanks for the moderator guidelines, +Chris Robinson shared them to us in the Science on Google+ community.
I also like the cool new G+ communities feature, however finding people who would like to join the community I've got started isn't an easy task. People hardly ever care to like anything I have to share & its OK, I guess its all about being well known as it is in most places dealing with social aspects. Either way I won't quit making efforts to share fairly on G+.

I just wish it didn't feel like its just a popularity contest online, which for many folks it seems to be the case today.

I like your idea here to focus on the management, and filtering side of making communities effective. Cool post +Fraser Cain.
I have taken +Fraser Cain 30 day challenge and found reshares and +1s are up by a factor of 10. Not by anything I've done other than be part of a well managed and moderated on topic community.

The secret of social media is to give not get. If you give as Fraser does people involve you and share your interesting material.
That's all I do is give, and its getting really old actually to spend so much of myself and to see very little feedback on any of it, but yeah I know what you mean Peter.

Some times its also about getting to meet people, and allowing others to get a chance to show what they have to offer to a community as well, the meeting part online isn't easy at all for most of us anyhow. 
It's very interesting what you are trying to test. This week there have been multiple threads by people who have now sworn off of Communities, viewing them, after pros and cons, as failures to bring an overall improved experience. But the again, so many people.. and thus multiple ways to organize content and people on G+ ... Not everyone will be experiencing each of the G+ features or forms of content in the same way.
"I could be wrong, but I'm finding it's harder to connect with Brand Pages. There's nobody home."

Yep, I think there are quite a few Pages that are nothing but placeholders to prevent squatting. For instance +Dennis Miller; the light is on but no one is home.

There used to be a dozen or so haters out there impersonating +Benjamin Netanyahu with fake and slanderous Pages, so anyone in the public eye and all fortune 1000 businesses ought to stake a claim to their Google+ birthrights if only for reputation management.
+Fraser Cain I'm not exactly sure where I'm suppose to mention you, otherwise I would have. Are you talking about mentioned in the community itself?
tim hem
my stream seems very glitchy since communities started. Its now quite random as to which posts appear in my "All" feed. Peoples whos posts should be there dont appear, and community posts that I dont want in it do appear.
Is it just me? I dont see anyone else complaining about it
+JF Baconnet Are you making use of your circles and turning off circles, and only keeping the people you don't want to miss turned on in your main stream?
+JF Baconnet Bizarre. I wish I knew what to suggest. I, too, would be frustrated in that situation.
Psign me up for that mr cain it sounds interesting.
+Fraser Cain you have got my creative juices boiling in the past 24 hours. I am really interested in what you are doing and have to say. In regard to your above post, I wonder if you are not expending too much effort on trying to grow your community from the top down instead of from the ground up. In reading your post about top peoples reluctance to participate with your community for fear of losing hard won followers, have you thought about the reverse side of the coin? Why limit your growth to people with communities with 500 or greater when you are in the enviable position of hand selecting talented people who would like to grow their following WITHIN your community? IE, I am a rather specialized photographer. I excel in night photography and night sky shooting and teach workshops in my local area on the subject. I would love to set up something like a weekly posting within your community where I share techniques, pictures and assist people who want to capture good shots of the night sky. I would think this would enrich your present base and encourage new subscribers as well. Why limit your invite to 500? It would seem to me its a win win situation. If not, discontinue the weekly posting due to lack of interest and nothing is lost. Just some food for thought while you are taking your sabbatical browsing the communities and their possibilities. Somehow I don't think you really are blind when it comes to the possibilities like you were saying you were. ;-) Would love to talk to you more on the subject.
Matt Pollock
That Community I mentioned (limited to 500+) is a group specifically for Community Owners, so they're mostly dealing with administrative issues about spam control, etc.

With regards to the Space community itself, you're absolutely right. The community is a fantastic platform for people willing to create high quality material. It seriously lets you jump in front of a huge audience looking for good stuff.

I'm trying to do both. I'm setting a high standard for posts that stay in the community, and I'm encouraging high quality people (like you) to stick around and participate.

I think that most community owners were hoping that high quality communities would just form naturally, but clearly that's not the case.
+Fraser Cain
 - Ah. I think I am following your thought process. So let me refine my idea a bit more. Lets use an example.

The photographer I have seen with the largest exposure on G+ is Trey Ratcliff. A very talented and fine photographic artist. He is probably best known for his prowess in HDR post processing. Obviously, you have created a top notch, high quality community yourself. Now what if someone like Trey was just starting out.

He would want to gather a following. If you were to provide someone like him with a path to create a community or following within your well organized structure and he reached the level of success he has today, you would have at least 50,000 more subscribers than you do now (if he had the exposure to your subscription base from the beginning I'm sure it would have been much larger). All of this would have resided inside your community. This example may not be a perfect fit, but I think you get my drift. The main obstacle is how does he obtain the keys to set up shop inside your domain. In regard to myself, if I wanted to work with you on a similar project structure, how would I gain access to work out the details. As of now, I can only post to you here publicly and to my knowledge have no way to privately communicate without some kind of invite to a secured channel on G+ or some outside source such as email. 
If you want to privately communicate with someone on G+, just +mention them. You can share a post with just a single person.

By actively participating in communities, high quality people will get circled transferring their local popularity within the community into more general popularity. That way everything they post public will be visible to a wide audience.

There's no way to really get keys within a community. You can create high quality material and rise to prominence and familiarity, or be a spammer and get instabanned. Everyone will fall somewhere along that spectrum.

But communities have only been around for 3 weeks now, so let's see what happens over time.
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