Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Frank LoMonte
200 followers -
First Amendment lawyer in Arlington, Va.
First Amendment lawyer in Arlington, Va.

200 followers
About
Frank's posts

Post has attachment
FERPA is a desperately broken statute that is making campuses less safe. Well-intended to protect the privacy of students' academic records, FERPA has morphed into a "giant secrecy monster" that colleges and schools abuse for purposes of image control, including misleading the public about how often rapes happen and how leniently they are punished. 

Post has attachment
The Student Press Law Center and press-freedom advocates everywhere are denouncing a Pennsylvania school district's punitive action against a student editor and her faculty adviser for the "offense" of refusing to publish a letter-to-the-editor containing a term ("Redskins") that the editors consider a racial slur.  

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
Just wrapped up an electrifying week barnstorming across the West with Mary Beth Tinker in the Tinker Tour van. The adventure continues online at www.tinkertourusa.org. Follow along, and support the Tinker Tour with your tax-deductible donation at http://www.splc.org/support/partners.asp.
Photo

Post has attachment
What's happening to high school students in Sheridan, Arkansas, unmistakably is bullying as the dictionary has always defined it: A person wrongfully using power to make a weaker person feel helpless. But because the bullying is done by a superintendent with a rulebook and not a student with a Facebook page, it carries the stamp of legitimacy. Let's let Superintendent Brenda Haynes and the Sheridan school board know that school bullying is always wrong, and especially when the bullies are those claiming the legitimacy of government authority.

Post has shared content
Such a refreshing change in access to municipal code, in great contrast to not-so-long-ago when it took hiring an attorney to get access to machine readable muni code (or statutes).  Congrats on the launch of DC Decoded.

Post has shared content
Are colleges overstepping the First Amendment in regulating their athletes' online lives? The SPLC and journalism students from the University of Maryland collaborated on a public-records audit and examined the policies of 59 major public colleges in a report released as part of Sunshine Week 2014. The two-part package of stories is available for free republication under a Creative Commons license.

Post has attachment
Last fall, the Tinker Tour barnstormed nearly 16,000 miles across 19 eastern states, bringing optimism and empowerment to young people desperately in need of both. The job is unfinished and the journey is incomplete. Help give Mary Beth and Mike a lift to bring their magical freedom bus to the rest of America, teaching young people they can be a powerful force for positive social change if they use their voices and cherish their rights. We need your tax-deductible donation, TODAY, to help build more civically minded schools that welcome discussion of issues of social and political importance.

Post has attachment
FERPA is a good idea gone horribly wrong. The federal government's attempt to protect students' academic privacy produced a botched statute that has become the catch-all excuse whenever schools and colleges want to keep information hidden, even statistics about school violence or records of college athletic scandals. One South Georgia school district went "above and beyond" in 2013, and earned the distinction, "FERPA Fib of the Year" from the Student Press Law Center, for making a bereaved family go to court to obtain surveillance video that might shed light on their son's mysterious death in the school gym. Read about all the Fibber Finalists on SPLC's FERPA Fact blog.

Post has attachment
As frictionless access to the Web "democratized" publishing, it became fashionable for commentators to denigrate experienced journalists as "arrogant" for thinking that they were better at selecting news than any other citizen. The results of this social experiment are in. It turns out that people who are deeply invested in creating news -- who attend City Hall meetings, cultivate Capitol sources, ride the beat with cops -- really do serve a more nutritious "news diet" than do aggregators fishing for clicks.
Part of journalism has always been about making civically responsible news judgments with the goal of steering public attention toward problems that need solving. That sense of civic responsibility is missing from the DNA of an organization that claims to be in the business of "feeding your buzz." It is no more "arrogant" for a journalist to claim expertise at selecting news stories than it is for a mechanic to claim he can fix your car more proficiently than you can. News judgment is an expertise. When society started believing otherwise is when the bottom fell out of the journalism economy. 
We are in a perilous era of journalism without conscience. I have no wish to check into a hospital, or board an airplane, run by people who operate without a moral grounding in the consequences of their actions. I do not wish to get my news there, either.
Wait while more posts are being loaded