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Frank Kieviet
Works at Google
Lives in Irvine, CA
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Frank Kieviet

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Google Calendar hidden gem (it's hidden very well: I was looking for it and could not find it): undelete deleted events as follows:

>>See deleted events in your trash (computer only)
When you delete an event you created or have edit access to, it stays in that calendar's trash for 30 days. When you go to the trash, you can restore events, or delete them forever.

Note: Anyone who has "Make changes to events" or "Make changes AND manage sharing" permission for the calendar can see and move events in the trash.

On your computer, open Google Calendar.
On the left side of the page, find the My calendars list.
To the right of your calendar's name, click the dropdown menu  > Trash. You'll see the events that were deleted from this calendar.
Check the box to the left of any events you want to move.
Click Delete forever or Restore selected events.
To delete all the events in your trash, click Empty trash now.
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Frank Kieviet

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This is how Jim Crow disenfranchisement worked. Nowadays, we do it through gerrymandering, voter ID, and felony drug possession.
This week’s Supreme Court decision in Shelby County v. Holder overturned Section 4(b) of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which mandated federal oversight o ...
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Frank Kieviet

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If you have two minutes... This is fun!
 
The most unusual StreetView ever...if you don't become a miniature railway enthusiast after watching this video you never will :-)

For an example of the insanely detailed models, check out this SV scene of the airport terminal: http://www.google.com/maps/about/behind-the-scenes/streetview/treks/miniatur-wunderland/#airport/terminal-frontside
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Frank Kieviet

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How do people or companies with vested interests spread ignorance and obfuscate knowledge? Georgina Kenyon finds there is a term which defines this phenomenon.
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Post-mortems (take that term literally) should be more like investigations after air plane crashes.

>>The aversion to what officers derisively refer to as “second-guessing” does not only make officers less receptive to a critique of their actions, it also makes them reluctant to provide their own complete and honest critiques. 
The mistrial in the Freddie Gray case reveals the value of helping officers learn from their mistakes.
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Frank Kieviet

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An interesting article...

>>In Europe, killing is considered unnecessary if alternatives exist. For example, national guidelines in Spain would have prescribed that Wilson incrementally pursue verbal warnings, warning shots, and shots at nonvital parts of the body before resorting to deadly force. Six shots would likely be deemed disproportionate to the threat that Brown, unarmed and wounded, allegedly posed.

In the US, only eight states require verbal warnings (when possible), while warning and leg shots are typically prohibited. 

>>Less-lethal weapon holders make up only about 20 percent of deadly force victims in the US. Yet the rates of these deaths alone exceed total known deadly force rates in any European county.

Knife violence is a big problem in England, yet British police have fatally shot only one person wielding a knife since 2008—a hostage-taker. By comparison, my calculations based on data compiled by fatalencounters.org and the Washington Post show that US police have fatally shot more than 575 people allegedly wielding blades and other such weapons just in the years since 2013.




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Have him in circles
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Frank Kieviet

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Trip to Joshua Tree
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Frank Kieviet

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Joshua Tree: trip to Wallstreet Mill

The sun had just set when we started on the trail. By the time we got to the mill, it was dark. We found the way back in the darkness with Google Maps.
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Frank Kieviet

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The corruption is shocking
 
Witnesses to the Laquan McDonald killing were threatened by officers and ordered to change their accounts to match the Chicago police version, attorneys say.
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Frank Kieviet

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This is a long but very interesting article about the many problems of the American legal system, authored by a judge. Long, but very much worth your time.
 
Alex Kozinski is a judge on the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. A few months ago, he wrote an article in the Georgetown Law Journal's Annual Review of Criminal Procedure discussing failures in our system of criminal law which reduce much of what the courts do, in his words, to "guesswork." More importantly, he gives a detailed list of suggestions for how to remedy the problems.

Unlike many discussions in the past year, this article isn't about police: it's primarily about prosecutors, juries, and judges, things which are often treated as "black boxes" not only by the press but by the legal system itself. So it's an opening into a number of issues that you may not be familiar with.

The article itself is deep and incisive, and highlights Kozinski as one of the finest legal minds we see on the bench today. If I were President, it alone would move him to the top of my short list for people to nominate to the Supreme Court: this ability to think outside of the fixed patterns of "it's how we do it because it's how we've always done it" is precisely the sort of thing that makes for a great Justice.

Article here: http://georgetownlawjournal.org/files/2015/06/Kozinski_Preface.pdf

h/t to +Sai for the link.

(Incidentally, Kozinski was appointed to the 9th Circuit by Reagan in 1985, and served as Chief Judge of that circuit from 2007 until the end of 2014)
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Introduction
Currently working at Google.
Work
Occupation
Software Engineer
Employment
  • Google
    Software Engineer, present
  • Oracle, Sun Microsystems (now Oracle), SeeBeyond (later Sun Microsystems), IPNet-Solutions, SimSci
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