Profile

Cover photo
Frank Kieviet
Works at Google
Lives in Irvine, CA
381 followers|1,326,708 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

Frank Kieviet

Shared publicly  - 
 
Another day, another shooting of an unarmed person by police.

Meanwhile the media are all over someone shooting a lion in Africa.
 
A Prosecutor on the Killer Cop He Indicted: 'This Should Not Happen, Ever' http://trib.al/pWtI590
His press conference announcing murder charges had just one flaw: he understated how often police officers shoot unarmed people in traffic stops.
1 comment on original post
1
Add a comment...

Frank Kieviet

Shared publicly  - 
 
"So within six years, we’ve had two-high profile incidents involving this task force, one that critically injured a baby and one that resulted in the death of an innocent pastor. In both cases, the officers were cleared by the local police agency, the local DA, a grand jury and the state police. And in both cases, outside investigators later turned up information not only damning but also devastating, and that should have been obvious to anyone investigating these cases with any interest in getting at the truth, rather than merely exonerating the police officers involved. These cases are worth keeping in mind when we hear about police investigations that clear other cops of wrongdoing"
swat teams, police militarization, flashbangs, drug raids, police raids, drug war, war on drugs, drug war deaths, police accountability,
3
Add a comment...

Frank Kieviet

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
"you want NewsCorp to develop and place an editorial in the WSJ emphasizing that Google's stock will lose value in the face of a sustained attack by AGs and noting some of the possible causes of action we have developed"

An example of how the media actually works behind the scenes, how much of what you see in big news outlets is bought by PR firms, and how astroturf "non-profits" claiming to work for the public interest are really tools of regulatory capture.
1 comment on original post
1
Add a comment...

Frank Kieviet

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
More people are in prison in America than anywhere else in the world. President Obama and politicians from both parties want to change that. Rajini Vaidyanathan looks at how the US prison population got to record levels.
109 comments on original post
2
Add a comment...

Frank Kieviet

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
My feelings about the death penalty are fairly complex: I don't have a simple argument that fits neatly into most political narratives. And I suspect that my readers have a fairly wide range of views as well. But I also suspect that there is one thing most of us can agree on: this man is rather frightening, and does not behave in a way that makes me think he is stable enough to be trusted with important responsibilities.

One thing which this highlights is a key article which influenced the recent Supreme Court case on the death penalty, Glossip v. Gross, about the geography of the death penalty: 

https://www.bu.edu/law/central/jd/organizations/journals/bulr/documents/SMITH_001.pdf

What's stunning is the geographic variation with which it's applied. Rather than measuring at the state level, as most previous studies did, Smith examined the death penalty at the county level, and found that the variation is far greater than previously expected. It turns out that only 121 counties (out of a total of 3,143 in the US) account for 76% of all death sentences; twenty-nine of those counties alone accounted for 44%. 

In the news article below, Smith commented that his study did not actually drill down far enough: in Caddo Parish, for example – one of those most active counties – the death sentences overwhelmingly came from cases prosecuted by one man, in this case, Dale Cox. And these dynamics do indeed seem to be tied to the person rather than the place: for example, when Lynne Abraham left her post as Philadelphia's DA, the rate of death sentences dropped by a factor of three.

The serious consequence of this is that not only is the death penalty being applied nonuniformly by race and class, and by geography, but it appears to be applied in a fashion determined overwhelmingly by the individual personalities of a handful of prosecutors across the country, who are responsible for the large majority of all death sentences. These prosecutors are not systematically in high-crime areas; other prosecutors in adjacent counties, or counties with comparable statistics, show radically incomparable numbers.

This is, in brief, fucked up. If a main function of the law is to render interactions between people more predictable, with known consequences for known actions, then to have this level of variation from county to county, or from prosecutor to prosecutor, destroys that predictability entirely. 

And quite besides that, it would seem that some of the prosecutors in question are of questionable stability. A man who describes his job goal as to "kill more people" (his words, and he has stood by them), who threatens defense counsel when they file opposing motions, and who will gladly give lectures about how (despite sharply declining murder rates) "we've become a jungle" and more killing is needed, does not strike me as the sort of person who necessarily should be in the streets unsupervised, much less acting with the power of life and death over others.

One thing which I feel very strongly about with regards to any form of justice, but especially with the death penalty: If you're going to do it, you have to do it right. This is not, by any standard, doing it right.
Dale Cox, the acting district attorney in Caddo Parish, La., has secured more than a third of Louisiana’s death sentences over the past five years.
178 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Frank Kieviet

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
NEW VIDEO! Should the largest lake in California exist? After all it was created by accident...
145 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
381 people
Bing Lu's profile photo
Samba Pedapalli's profile photo
Brittani Allred's profile photo
Tammie Egloff's profile photo
Aruna Gadige's profile photo
Jaleesa Peluso's profile photo
Sharon Raposo's profile photo
Ravi Desu's profile photo
Philip Branning's profile photo

Frank Kieviet

Shared publicly  - 
 
"And all of this has had a tremendous negative impact on the press, rather than a positive one as those behind the law insisted.

The negative impact on the online press sector is also very clear, since a very important channel to attract readers disappears, resulting in lower revenues from advertising. In addition, the new fee is also a barrier to the expansion of small publications with little-known brands, and an entry barrier for new competitors, since they will be unable to count on these platforms to increase their readers’ base. 

The evidence available so far shows that the impact on traffic has been negative and that less consolidated publishing titles, such as digital native newspapers, have been the worst affected. This is not only because the total number of publication readers has been reduced but, in the case of online readers that would be attracted anyway (that is, who would visit the publications web sites in some other way), they will surely end up visiting known publications with established brands, to the detriment of small and new publications, in line with the evidence in the literature analysed above

Of course, for the major newspaper publishers, maybe that's what they really wanted all along: less competition. But it's difficult to see how that's a legitimate public policy strategy."
2
Add a comment...

Frank Kieviet

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Forget everything you thought you knew about welfare.
Check out the truth behind these six common welfare myths, which you can now consider thoroughly debunked.
13 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Frank Kieviet

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
You may think that something is "just your opinion", but often you're just wrong.
1 comment on original post
2
Add a comment...

Frank Kieviet

Shared publicly  - 
 
"The city recently settled the lawsuit, but Gardena officials have fought to prevent the videos from becoming public. Organizations representing law enforcement leaders across California submitted court papers supporting Gardena’s efforts to keep the records sealed."
Videos that the city of Gardena fought to keep secret show police officers fatally shooting a man who appeared confused at their orders and did not appear to pose an immediate threat. Police wounded a second man.
2
Add a comment...

Frank Kieviet

Shared publicly  - 
 
This is weirdly entertaining...
1
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
381 people
Bing Lu's profile photo
Samba Pedapalli's profile photo
Brittani Allred's profile photo
Tammie Egloff's profile photo
Aruna Gadige's profile photo
Jaleesa Peluso's profile photo
Sharon Raposo's profile photo
Ravi Desu's profile photo
Philip Branning's profile photo
Collections Frank is following
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Irvine, CA
Story
Introduction
Currently working at Google.
Work
Occupation
Software Engineer
Employment
  • Google
    Software Engineer, present
  • Oracle, Sun Microsystems (now Oracle), SeeBeyond (later Sun Microsystems), IPNet-Solutions, SimSci
Basic Information
Gender
Male