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Francine Hardaway
Works at Stealthmode Partners
Attended Cornell University
Lives in Half Moon Bay and Phoenix
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Arizona friends: If you are concerned about our education standards, here's your chance to be heard. Please, please go and be heard. TL:dr May 7,8,9 in the Phoenix area. Look down for Tucson, Prescott, etc. 9-11:30 a.m. Saturday, May 2 Glendale High School, Glendale 5-7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 7 Coronado High School, Scottsdale 9-11:30 a.m. Saturday, May 9 Chandler High School Center for the Arts, Chandler Superintendent Douglas Launches “We Are Listening” Tour Hearing Every Voice, High Expectations for Every Child (Phoenix, Ariz., April 16, 2015) – Superintendent of Public Instruction Diane Douglas said today she will launch a statewide public tour next week to hear directly from Arizona residents about their opinions and concerns on all K-12 education issues. The annual process includes 1) a statewide series of meetings to listen to the public; 2) recommendations from Department of Education staff based on comments grouped into categories such as standards, curriculum, instruction, general, etc.; and 3) a statewide visit to the same sites to follow up with the public on recommended actions. “I am dedicated to continually improving the state of education in Arizona through conversations with the people it most directly affects—parents, students, teachers and administrators,” Douglas said. The Superintendent and Senate Education Chairman Kelli Ward will kick off the tour in Kingman, Ariz. on Thursday, April 23. Ward will act as Co-Chair for the meeting, which is being hosted by Mohave County School Superintendent Michael File. The public meeting will take place from 5-7:30 p.m. at the Mohave County Administration building, 700 W. Beale St., Kingman. Immediately upon being sworn into office, the Superintendent made it one of her top priorities to establish a process that allows local voices to be heard as important educational decisions are made, including the review of statewide standards. “It is paramount that Arizona not only has the highest standards possible, but that its standards belong to Arizona and are continually improved to best represent both student and local community needs,” said Superintendent Douglas. “This process allows us to hear every voice and set high expectations for every child.” The annual input from the public is likely to address many different topics, only one of which will be statewide standards. Those comments related to standards that are turned into draft recommendations will be presented to the State Board of Education (SBE). SBE will then open the standards for comment, and can calendar them and vote yes or no on the changes. Gov. Doug Ducey has asked the board to conduct a thorough review of Arizona’s current standards for English language arts and mathematics. In addition to that effort, the Superintendent’s statewide “We Are Listening” tour will provide annual feedback from the public. Tours 1-1-1 The attached process chart shows the many different inputs established by Superintendent Douglas, which include her tours, the Latino Education Advisory Committee, the African-American Education Advisory Committee, the Native American Education Advisory Committee, the normal review of portions of the standards that occurs annually within the Department of Education, and the process resulting from Gov. Ducey’s initiative. The “We Are Listening” tour will make a total of 14 stops around the state through the end of June. Members of the public also can submit their feedback via email at HearingEveryVoice@azed.gov, online at www.azed.gov/HearingEveryVoice, or via the @azedschools Twitter account using #HearingEveryVoice. 2015 “We Are Listening” Tour Stops Time Date Location 5-7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 23 Mohave County Administrative Building, Kingman 9-11:30 a.m. Saturday, April 25 Mohave Community College, Lake Havasu City 5-7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 30 Arizona Western College, Yuma 9-11:30 a.m. Saturday, May 2 Glendale High School, Glendale 5-7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 7 Coronado High School, Scottsdale 9-11:30 a.m. Saturday, May 9 Chandler High School Center for the Arts, Chandler 5-7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 28 Pima Community College Center for the Arts, Tucson 9-11:30 a.m. Saturday, May 30 Buena Performing Arts Center, Sierra Vista 5-7:30 p.m. Thursday, June 4 Gila Community College, Globe 9-11:30 a.m. Saturday, June 6 Casa Grande High School, Casa Grande 5-7:30 p.m. Thursday, June 11 Prescott High School, Prescott 9-11:30 a.m. Saturday, June 13 Location to be determined, Flagstaff 5-7:30 p.m. Thursday, June 18 Navajo Nation Council Chambers, Window Rock 9-11:30 a.m. Saturday, June 20 Round Valley Dome, Springerville http://www.azed.gov/HearingEveryVoice
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Today was full of slaps in the face. First a young girl in the Apple store said to me: "YOU have a Twitter account? What do you tweet?" After I told her I had 10k followers, she backtracked and I slapped her down for being ageist. Then the postman came and brought me my Apple Watch charging cable, but not the watch. Pwnd.
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Way to go +Francine Hardaway We need to educate these young whipersnapers. Not all old people are clueless about technology. We invented it.
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Apple 0 — Roadrunner Sports 1

Apple is the quintessential example of superb luxury brand merchandising, right? But I have just been sold $259 worth of athletic shoes (one pair) by Roadrunner Sports. Not your idea of a luxury brand. Better try-on experience than the Apple Watch, and the store actually had what I wanted to buy.

In all my years of running and now walking, this is the first time I’ve seen good technology applied to shoe fitting. It was an amazing combination of procedures that took about ten minutes and fitted me with a pair of those that have made a real difference.

I walked into the store and saw the wall of shoes at the rear, so I made my way toward it. I was doing my usual version of shopping, listening to a podcast (this was Iyaz Aktar, Sarah Lane and Tom Merritt on “The 404” and not aware of the sales help.

But I was intercepted by a woman whose first question was “have you been here before”? I had to say no. She then signed me up for the shoe fitting by simply asking my name. I was caught.

When I saw the computer monitors, I decided to turn off Iyaz and Sarah for a while and concentrate. This might be “something.”




Moments later a well-trained young man made me take off my socks and shoes. First he used the old-fashioned size fitter to determine what size I am. Even this level of service is rare in contemporary shoe sales. Then he stood me on the ‘Paw Dog,” which makes a heat map of your standing position and tells how your weight falls when you’re standing.


It all reads out on the monitor. Then he made me roll my pants above the ankle and put me on a treadmill to show how my ankles and feet moved while running. This, too, displayed on the computer in real time.


The next step was to heat up some normal insoles and then fit them to my feet. for this, I stood on the cushiony platform below, and he fit the warm insoles so they molded to my feet.


He then took me and my insoles to a salesperson, along with his recommendations for what kind of shoe I needed. No arch support (surprise) and no stablization (strong ankles). He also saved all my information in the network.

While waiting for the salesperson to bring out the boxes, he gave me a little $5.00 foot massager to try. I’ve got a few of those at home, but this one felt really great. And he supplied me with a new pair of dry-fit socks to use for the try-on.

I walked out wearing the perfect shoe, with the insoles ( added cost), 3 pairs of new socks (more added cost), and, of course, the little foot massager. At the register the salesperson told me all the information was saved so I could order my next pair online. She also gave me a $10 coupon. And she helped me take a product shot when I told her I was writing a blog post about this.


No wonder she was happy! This was the most I’ve ever spent on running shoes, and I knew all along I was being upsold and I really didn’t mind. In fact, I admired every step in the process. Let that be a lesson to retailers; it’s the service, stupid. It’s hardly ever the product.
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Yep too fast for a beginner. Seems like an hour routine crammed into a half. Good variety and flow of asanas.

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Two reviews of the Apple watch by people I admire, Nilay Patel and John Gruber, leave me feeling it's not a good product right now. They've tried to be nice to it, but it has a real problem: we all know what a watch should do well -- tell time. And we all know what the other smart watches do. http://www.theverge.com/a/apple-watch-review http://daringfireball.net/2015/04/the_apple_watch 
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I think many potential early adopters might be having second thoughts after reading the reviews this morning. 
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same here
keep meaning to check the full oxford english
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Here's Ellen Pao's interview with Katie Couric. More people should see this. http://news.yahoo.com/ellen-pao-talks-to-katie-couric-in-exclusive-interview-040627016.html
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Why is 4.20 important to the weed culture?
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Hard to believe, but millennials want to communicate with brands by email.
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By the time I woke up this morning at 5 AM PDT and logged onto the Apple Store, the delivery date for the Apple Watch Sport was June. My first clue to the mis-marketing of this product was the fact that I could even get into the store. When the phones and the IPad launched, you couldn’t get into the store for a day. So Apple scammed us. They ordered low numbers on the watch, told us to order online, and allowed themselves to run out without even crashing the site. This product is being badly mis-marketed, IMHO. When I decided I might try to buy the Watch anyway, I got a screen that said “add AppleCare $49” and then “add a magnetic charger $49” and then “charging cable $19” ; with the choices I made, by the time I got to the checkout it would be $427 to buy something that I didn’t even know if I wanted. The forced upsell. I did the retailer’s nightmare; I abandoned my cart in anger and frustration and got on Twitter to bitch. Warner Crocker helpfully told me I didn’t have to buy the charging cable; one came in the box. But that was not intuitive from the order form. I’m a short woman with thin wrists, so I thought I’d want one in the 38 mm size which is probably the size for my wrist. Unfortunately, that’s probably not the size for my eyes. I’m not sure that anyone inside Apple marketing thinks of older people with vision problems when they think of the Apple Watch designing the Apple Watch. I had that problem with Pebble when I first got mine; I couldn’t see the screen. Still can’t see it unobtrusively; I really have to focus. And no, I don’t want to wear glasses. We widows may have money to spend ( you’d be surprised where the philanthropy money is concentrated in the US), but we are clearly not the market. Not only does the wearer have to be without vision difficulties, but she probably can’t have arthritis, either. I also no longer have anyone to tap my heartbeat to, except perhaps my cardiologist, I have an amusing visual of a cardiologist sitting in front of a dashboard on which are displayed the taps of heartbeats off the Apple Watches of his wealthy patients. When I went to check online to see what other people’s experiences have been I found dad by and large they weren’t satisfactory. Many people had the same experience I did — they got on the store site and found that the ship date was June or July. In the UK, somebody went to the Apple Store to try on the $17,000 addition and found out that the staff was not ready to sell it. Now these may be one-off experiences and the Watch mbe wonderful for all I know, but if you’re trying to get someone who regularly wears a watch — especially another kind of watch as I do the Pebble — and who is satisfied with that watch to change, you’re not going to get me to change that easily with what was on display this morning of the customer experience. I’m a bit tougher to persuade, despite the fact that I stood in line for the first iPhone. And yes I know that the first iPhone was not ready for prime time either, and became much better with the App Store, but I stood online because it seems like such a fun community experience. Now that we’ve been encouraged to order online we are not having a community experience, we are having a frustrating one in which it is easy to lose motivation — the kind of experience the kind that makes you abandon your cart at the check out and wait for the dust to settle so you can see whether this is even worth doing, or whether I should just save my pennies for a VR headset or a new drone. I believe it was a really bad marketing idea to try to drive people online for this one. We badly needed some hype and motivation to love this product. Update: Used the Apple Store app and got an appointment to try on tomorrow at 2:15.
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Me neither. I'm going to the store tomorrow so we'll see
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Look at this chart of how Android users stop using common social apps after 90 days. It's very telling. Only FB retains its value. Got this from The Information -- great site to subscribe to, btw. https://scontent-2.22773.fna.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xfa1/v/t1.0-9/19598_10154613368873647_219204174221987782_n.jpg?oh=533c89043f2fa825a2b227948cd7b81b&oe=55AB4EE5
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The Information asked a startup called Quettra <https://www.quettra.com/> for
user-retention information for 19 well-known social apps
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There's a common complaint in Arizona that we lack an ecosystem for innovation. Actually, this isn't quite true. We don't have one ecosystem, we have several, each one operating in its own tiny orbit, either ignorant of or inattentive to what's going on everywhere else. Now that is about to stop. A group of business leaders -- not government workers or even service providers -- from that dispersed ecosystem has decided to pull it together. First, we want everyone involved in the Arizona entrepreneurial ecosystem to complete a short survey to tell us what you want from a "portal" for entrepreneurs. It's called a portal because no one has a better name, but what the team really means is a common internet space where all the available resources are aggregated. But first, there's the matter of "customer development." And you are the customer. What would YOU like to see from an entrepreneurship portal for Arizona? Here's the survey. "You can't win if you don't play." Take a minute and tell us. http://bit.ly/1BMA4YY And this is not Maricopa County centric. It's statewide. The Arizona Commerce Authority started the ball rolling by creating a strawperson startup portal and sending it out for comments before it launched. Serenditipitously this coincided with StartupWeek Phoenix and Venture Madness, two successful ecosystem events that occurred last month. During Startup Week, the major sponsor of Startup Week, Chase, hosted a dinner for influentials in entrepreneurship. We all sat down over our glasses of wine and during the course of the dinner realized that while we had been watching the pot, the popcorn had actually begun to pop. (Great metaphor, not mine). Things are happening in Arizona now. We don't have to complain anymore. We just have to get shit done. We've got twice as much venture capital as we had previously and an extraordinary number of co-working spaces and accelerators. We've got events, teams, and roadmaps. GoDaddy IPOed last week. On the biotech side, a ten year roadmap has let to partnerships between ASU, Banner, and University of Arizona Medical School, and a medical corridor around Mayo in Scottsdale. Healthcare in Arizona is booming. It seems to me I'm constantly being called upon to judge pitches from companies competing for real awards, like the BioAccel Scorpion Pit in May and the Arizona Innovation Challenge right now. And for the first time I can remember, people who left Phoenix for greener pastures are coming home. So help us out here. Fill out the survey and let's keep the popcorn going.
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In her circles
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Education
  • Cornell University
  • Columbia University
  • Syracuse University
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Looking for
Friends, A relationship
Relationship
Widowed
Other names
Francine Olman
Story
Tagline
I'm a kickass coach for early stage businesses who also need a good evangelist.
Introduction
I'm an extrovert for whom social media was made. Three time entrepreneur, angel investor, and mentor to over 600 businesses. Now coaching and mentoring all over the world.

I've also been an English Professor, an author, a mother, a foster mom, a yoga practitioner, a world traveler, and a catalyst for business growth.

Oh, and I built a geodesic dome home in the 70's. That probably says it all.
Bragging rights
I raised three foster kids to be taxpayers
Work
Occupation
Accelerator for tech businesses
Employment
  • Stealthmode Partners
    Accelerator for tech businesses, present
  • Intel
  • Hardaway Marketing Services
  • Innovative Environmental Products
  • Hardaway Connections
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Half Moon Bay and Phoenix
Previously
New York - Phoenix - Half Moon Bay - New York
This salon is very different from your average salon. It's a quiet, intelligent place where the customer is taken seriously, and gossip is at a minimum. Both David and Frank are true professionals with many years of experience and a willingness to learn new things. They are also fun to talk to. They're good listeners to what you want, and really try to give it to you and/or make constructive and honest suggestions. And this place is CLEAN.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
2 reviews
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