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Inferno Tour Florence
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Symbols and places mentioned in Dan Brown’s novel Inferno, and much about Florence
Symbols and places mentioned in Dan Brown’s novel Inferno, and much about Florence

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The Uffizi Gallery has the world’s finest collection of Italian Renaissance paintings, particularly those of the Florentine school. It also has antiques, sculptures, and more than 100,000 drawings and prints.
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Robert Langdon, the main character in Dan Brown’s Inferno, in describing the Baptistry of Florence was attracted to the suspended tomb of Antipope Giovanni XXIII (John XXIII). To Langdon, it seems that the antipope’s body lies in repose high up on the wall like a cave dweller or a subject in a magician’s levitation trick.
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The clock on the tower’s facade of Palazzo Vecchio was Florence’s first public clock. The special feature of the clock in Arnolfo Tower is its single hand, which was typical of the first clocks built in the Middle Ages.
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Vasari’s Last Judgment is located beneath the dome of the Florence Cathedral, which had remained unfinished after Brunelleschi’s death in 1446. As such, the walls of the dome, which should have been covered by resplendent gold accoring to Brunelleschi project, were whitewashed.
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Andrea Orcagna, originally known as Andrea di Cione, was one of the most prominent Florentine painter, sculptor, and architect of the mid-14th century. He is mentioned in Dan Brown’s latest novel Inferno. To be specific, the novel’s main character Robert Langdon refers to the terrifying black demon whose red hair is smeared with the blood of his victims and who is attributed to Orcagna.
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Paradise is the third part of The Divine Comedy, and in Canto 25 Dante - author and main character of the poem - deals with a kind of “examination” about the three theological virtues: Faith, Hope, and Charity.
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The Uffizi Gallery has the world’s finest collection of Italian Renaissance paintings, particularly those of the Florentine school. It also has antiques, sculptures, and more than 100,000 drawings and prints.
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The Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Firenze (National Central Library of Florence) is a national public library in Florence, the largest in Italy and one of most important in Europe.
The library owns approximately 6,000,000 printed volumes, 2,689,672 pamphlets, 25,000 manuscripts, 4,000 incunabula, 29,000 editions from the sixteenth century, and over 1,000,000 autographs.
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Filippo Brunelleschi (1377-1446) was a Florentine architect and sculptor credited for helping to create the Renaissance style in architecture. His most famous work, the dome of the Santa Maria del Fiore Cathedral in Florence.
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Read our interview to Nathan Smith, the instructor of the Florence photography adventure tour, who has lived and worked in Pisa, Tuscany with his family since 2009.
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