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Artist SIMON LEUNG will be available to discuss his work from 4:00-5:00pm on Monday, April 24, 2017

Simon Leung: Leung was born in Hong Kong and was raised there and in California. Internationally, his work has been presented at the Venice Biennale (2003), the Guangzhou Triennial (2008), the Generali Foundation (Vienna), 1A Space (Hong Kong), the Ujazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art (Warsaw), neue Gesellschaft für bildende Kunst (Berlin), Sala Mendoza (Caracas), and the National Museum of Contemporary Art (South Korea). In the US, his work has been shown at the Whitney Biennial (1993), the Museum of Modern Art, the New Museum, the Santa Monica Museum of Art, The Kitchen, MOCA, the Hammer Museum, and the MAK Center.

He has been a Guggenheim Fellow, a scholar in residence at the Clark Art Institute, and the recipient of the Art Journal Award for his writing. Educated at UCLA, Columbia University, and the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program, Leung has taught at Cal Arts, UCLA, NYU, RISD, Bard, and since 2001, at UC Irvine, where he is Professor of Art and director of graduate studies.

Leung’s projects in various media include an opera set in Griffith Park; a live/video performance addressing AIDS in the figure of the glory hole; a trilogy on “the residual space of the Vietnam War;” an extended proposal of Duchamp’s oeuvre as a discourse in ethics; a meditation on the site/non-site dialectic by way of Edgar Allan Poe; context-specific works centering on the squatting body as a heuristic cipher; and a twenty-year plus collaboration with the writer and art world figure Warren Niesłuchowski. Leung’s most recently completed work is ACTIONS! / ADJUNCTS!, an “art workers’ theater” project on the intersection of art and labor. Although not collected under any mediumistic or stylistic rubric, at the heart of all of Leung’s work is the meditation of the ethical, broadly defined, as proposition and possibility.
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Sean Griffin: Whether inventing a Neanderthal language, or composing hysteric choreographic and choral methodologies used in films and installations, celebrated chamber music works, operas, and devised music theater, to hundreds of numerically-conceived collages and drawings, intuitive and experimental music practices lie at the foundation of Sean Griffin’s works.

His densely polyphonic strategies emerge from over 20 years of international productions in the living arts. With the performance and design consortium he founded in 2010, Opera Povera, Griffin collaboratively combines ethnographic, archival, and historical research with critical artistic inquiry and improvisation. Mixing performance with sculptural sets, inspirational discards, assembled utilitarian objects, he has been active throughout the US, Mexico, Asia, and Europe, directing, designing, arranging, recording, and conducting while creating new opera.

Griffin received an MFA from CalArts and a PhD from UCSD. He is currently establishing a new course in Experimental Media Scoring as Associate Professor in the Engineering Division of the Department of Art and Enterprise at University of Guanajuato, Campus Irapuato-Salamanca, GTO, México. Griffin has worked closely with key collaborators and realized many music, film, installation, and theater works with Charles Gaines, Pauline Oliveros, George Lewis, Catherine Sullivan, Anne LeBaron, Aiyun Huang, and Juliana Snapper. Griffin’s productions, recordings, performances, and designs have been featured at MoMA, Brooklyn Museum, RedCat, LACMA, MAK Center at the Schindler House, Volksbühne, Secession Vienna, EMPAC, the 56th Venice Biennial, Chicago’s MCA, Ostrava Days, Tate Modern, Royal Academy of Arts, June In Buffalo, Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival, Gwangju Biennial, Seoul’s Festival BO:M, Taipei’s Forum Music, and forthcoming in the 2017 Ojai Music Festival.
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Susan Silton: Silton resides in Los Angeles. Her multi-disciplinary projects engage multiple aesthetic strategies to mine the complexities of subjectivity and subject positions, often through poetic combinations of humor, discomfort, subterfuge and unabashed beauty. Silton’s work takes form in performative and participatory-based projects, photography, video, installation, text/audio works, and print-based projects, and presents in diverse contexts such as public sites, social network platforms, and traditional galleries and institutions. As both an individual and as part of participatory projects she generates, Silton consistently folds political content into formally rigorous presentations.

Her work has been exhibited/presented nationally and internationally at Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; SFMOMA, San Francisco; Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects; LA><ART, Los Angeles; Hammer Museum; ICA/ Philadelphia; MAK Center for Art and Architecture, Los Angeles; and Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne, among others.

Projects include the commissioned installation, In everything there is the trace at USC Fisher Museum, the book project, Who's in a Name? (both 2013), and the site-specific opera, A Sublime Madness in the Soul (composed by Juliana Snapper, 2015), which presented through the windows of
the artist’s then-studio in downtown Los Angeles.

In November, 2015, Silton’s Whistling Project was included in SITE Santa Fe’s year-long series of exhibitions, SITE 20 Years/20 Shows, which included a commissioned performance by Silton’s women’s whistling group, The Crowing Hens. She has received fellowships and awards from the Getty/California Community Foundation, Art Matters, Center for Cultural Innovation, Cultural Affairs Department of the City of Los Angeles, The MacDowell Colony, Banff Centre for the Arts, Durfee Foundation, The Shifting Foundation, and most recently, Fellows of Contemporary Art. Silton’s work has been featured in numerous publications including Artforum, Art21, KCET’s Artbound, Art in America, X-TRA, ArtLies, Flash Art, and Cabinet.
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Fellows of Contemporary Art (FOCA), founded in 1975, is a non-profit, independent, and membership-based organization. Fellows of Contemporary Art supports emerging and mid-career California artists through awards, exhibitions, including accompanying catalogues, and diverse educational events for its members.
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[Theme image for Event, close up of: Simon Leung, Chinese Government Pavilion, 2017, Photograph, 44 1/2" x 54 1/2"]

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Added photos to 2017 FOCAFellowships.

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YOU ARE INVITED TO MEET THE 2017 FOCAFELLOWSHIPS AWARD WINNERS

SEAN GRIFFIN, SIMON LEUNG, AND SUSAN SILTON wInners of a $10,000 unrestricted award each

“THE SPACE OF A MOMENT TO MEASURE”

DIALOGUE with ARTISTS: at 7:00pm
with Moderator JIM DAICHENDT, Professor of Art History and Dean of the Arts and Humanities at Point Loma Nazarene University

FOCA office exhibition space
970 North Broadway (Mandarin Plaza), Suite 208
Los Angeles, CA 90012

Exhibit continues until April 24, 2017
Hours: Monday through Friday, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Tel: (213) 808-1008

Weekends by appointment only: Call Judith Tuch, FOCAFellowships Chair, (310) 849-9795
or Rosalyn Firemark, FOCAFellowships Co-Chair, (310) 922-6024

[cover artwork: Susan Silton, A Sublime Madness in the Soul, 2015. Documentation still from opera sited on 6th Street Bridge, downtown Los Angeles. Composed by Juliana Snapper. Photo: Alex Brown // Simon Leung, Time Museum Time, 2010 // Sean Griffin, The Naming Scene from Act 2 of Sean Griffin’s production of George Lewis’s Afterword at the Jiří Myron Theatre, Ostrava Days, The Czech Republic, 2015. Photo by the artist]

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Please join us as we close this exhibit with catalog launch and live performance by artists Robert Crouch and Yann Novak.

The Future Eve curated by VOLUME member Jared Baxter explores the relationship between technology and the body and features video, sculpture, drawing, installation and sound by 5 California-based artists:
Robert Crouch
Nicole Phungrasamee Fein
Karen Lofgren
Yann Novak
Dean Smith

Jared Baxter was born in St. Louis, Missouri, and studied German literature at Reed College. His writing on art has appeared in Artslant, Flash Art, and Native Strategies, and he joined VOLUME as a curator in 2012. His recent projects include Haunted Formalism, an exhibition of new works by Nicole Phungrasamee Fein and Dean Smith at Del Vaz. He lives and works in Los Angeles.

The Future Eve is the title of a science fiction novel from 1886 by Villiers de l’Isle-Adam. Credited with popularizing the term “android,” its protagonist is a fictionalized Thomas Alva Edison, hailed in a short foreword as the discoverer of “among others, the Telephone, the Phonograph, the Microphone, and those admirable electric lightbulbs which have now spread across the earth’s surface.”

The action begins with the return of an old friend, Lord Celian Ewald, who has arrived in a sense already dead. Fated by family tradition to love only once, the hapless aristocrat has fallen for a woman, evidently the mirror image of the Venus de Milo, whose materialistic personality falls far short of the ideal suggested by her beauty. He has thus resolved to commit suicide. Calling him back to life, Edison reveals that he has constructed a working prototype of an android, named Hadaly, who can be customized to duplicate this woman, with her inner flaws supplanted by machinery optimized for the realization of an allegedly scientific ideal of love.

Edison ushers the skeptical Ewald into a secret underground laboratory, where he expounds in detail upon the technical and philosophical underpinnings of his invention. The former discourse, which highlights features such as the two golden phonograph records that constitute Hadaly’s lungs and provide her voice and vocabulary, is notable for its inventive, at times nearly prophetic, use of then-nascent technologies. The latter stands out for its appalling sexism. The two strands merge when Edison presents two cinema reels, more than a decade before film was ever projected in public, depicting a woman who seduced a now-deceased friend to ruin with and without an elaborate array of cosmetic enhancements. If female beauty can be thus and so ruinously simulated, Edison seems to argue, he will spare men the risks of temptation by taking the matter to its logical conclusion.

The exhibition engages this dual legacy of Villiers’ novel, at once ahead of its time and deeply regressive. On the one hand, The Future Eve’s idealistic, if ideologically tainted, portrayal of the integration of man and machine is contrasted to the present climate, in which authors like economist Robert Gordon have argued that we have entered an era of permanently reduced technological advancement compared to the hundred-year period beginning in 1870. On the other, the sexism latent in the android narrative, highlighted by the example of Villiers’ Edison, is examined in terms of what it can reveal about broader cultural narratives surrounding technology and its relationship to nature, in particular through the latter’s omnipresent synecdoche, the body.

Recreating both Edison’s inner sanctum and the body of the android splayed wide, the art exhibition The Future Eve is a program that attempts to rewrite Hadaly’s code and a Frankenstein-esque monster formed from the hybridization of literary criticism and contemporary art. The exhibition features work in a variety of media, and raises provocative questions about autonomy, mediation, and sentience.

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The Fellows of Contemporary Art present:

The Future Eve, an exhibition curated by VOLUME member Jared Baxter, recipient of a FOCA Curators Lab grant for 2017.

The Future Eve explores the relationship between technology and the body and features video, sculpture, drawing, installation and sound by 5 California-based artists:
Robert Crouch
Nicole Phungrasamee Fein
Karen Lofgren
Yann Novak
Dean Smith


Opening Reception, Saturday, January 28, 2017 from 5-8 PM

A participatory discussion with curator Jared Baxter, exhibition artists and Allison de Fren, Assistant Professor of Media Arts and Culture, Occidental College, begins at 5:30 PM.

Exhibition continues to March 4, 2017: Hours: Monday – Friday 10am-5pm

Jared Baxter was born in St. Louis, Missouri, and studied German literature at Reed College. His writing on art has appeared in Artslant, Flash Art, and Native Strategies, and he joined VOLUME as a curator in 2012. His recent projects include Haunted Formalism, an exhibition of new works by Nicole Phungrasamee Fein and Dean Smith at Del Vaz. He lives and works in Los Angeles.

The Future Eve is the title of a science fiction novel from 1886 by Villiers de l’Isle-Adam. Credited with popularizing the term “android,” its protagonist is a fictionalized Thomas Alva Edison, hailed in a short foreword as the discoverer of “among others, the Telephone, the Phonograph, the Microphone, and those admirable electric lightbulbs which have now spread across the earth’s surface.”

The action begins with the return of an old friend, Lord Celian Ewald, who has arrived in a sense already dead. Fated by family tradition to love only once, the hapless aristocrat has fallen for a woman, evidently the mirror image of the Venus de Milo, whose materialistic personality falls far short of the ideal suggested by her beauty. He has thus resolved to commit suicide. Calling him back to life, Edison reveals that he has constructed a working prototype of an android, named Hadaly, who can be customized to duplicate this woman, with her inner flaws supplanted by machinery optimized for the realization of an allegedly scientific ideal of love.

Edison ushers the skeptical Ewald into a secret underground laboratory, where he expounds in detail upon the technical and philosophical underpinnings of his invention. The former discourse, which highlights features such as the two golden phonograph records that constitute Hadaly’s lungs and provide her voice and vocabulary, is notable for its inventive, at times nearly prophetic, use of then-nascent technologies. The latter stands out for its appalling sexism. The two strands merge when Edison presents two cinema reels, more than a decade before film was ever projected in public, depicting a woman who seduced a now-deceased friend to ruin with and without an elaborate array of cosmetic enhancements. If female beauty can be thus and so ruinously simulated, Edison seems to argue, he will spare men the risks of temptation by taking the matter to its logical conclusion.

The exhibition engages this dual legacy of Villiers’ novel, at once ahead of its time and deeply regressive. On the one hand, The Future Eve’s idealistic, if ideologically tainted, portrayal of the integration of man and machine is contrasted to the present climate, in which authors like economist Robert Gordon have argued that we have entered an era of permanently reduced technological advancement compared to the hundred-year period beginning in 1870. On the other, the sexism latent in the android narrative, highlighted by the example of Villiers’ Edison, is examined in terms of what it can reveal about broader cultural narratives surrounding technology and its relationship to nature, in particular through the latter’s omnipresent synecdoche, the body.

Recreating both Edison’s inner sanctum and the body of the android splayed wide, the art exhibition The Future Eve is a program that attempts to rewrite Hadaly’s code and a Frankenstein-esque monster formed from the hybridization of literary criticism and contemporary art. The exhibition features work in a variety of media, and raises provocative questions about autonomy, mediation, and sentience.

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Jason Ramos blogs about FOCA's Curators Lab Exhibition: UNCOMMON Ground (curated by Kate Whitlock)

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Read this +LA Weekly article about FOCA's Curators Lab Exhibition: UNCOMMON GROUND (curated by Kate Whitlock), article by Catherine Wagley

http://www.laweekly.com/arts/5-free-art-shows-to-see-in-la-this-week-7303910
Photo
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UNCOMMON GROUND Curated by Kate Whitlock
2 Photos - View album

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ARTISTS UPDATES:
Fellows Curators Award artist Tom Knechtel’s exhibition The Reader of His Own Self will open +CB1 Gallery  Saturday September 10 from 3-6 pm, and run through October 30, 2016.

Fellows of Contemporary Art organized Knechtel's On Waiting to Grow Horns: The Little Theatre of Tom Knechtel. Anne Ayers curated the show at the Ben Maltz Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design, Los Angeles. The show ran from Nov 9, 2002-Feb 15, 2003. +OtisCollege 

Artwork (image): Tom Knechtel: The Hanuman Yantra, 2001, 4 Color lithograph, 30 x 20 1/4 inches, Edition of 35

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Added photos to UNCOMMON GROUND Curated by Kate Whitlock.

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“The fact of the matter is that the real world is to a large extent unconsciously built up on the language habits of the group. We see and hear and otherwise experience very largely as we do because the language habits of our community predispose certain choices of interpretation.” -Edward Sapir

Over the past year, five artists who knew little of each other’s practice were encouraged to attend studio visits to familiarize themselves with each other’s body of work as it pertains to the alphabet. The casual meetings gave way to a transparent dialogue that helped inform, challenge and validate their individual languages. Inevitable similarities and overlaps in the artists’ singular realities resulted in a conservatory of documented sensory explorations that are visually uncommon, but grounded by the alphabet. Emphasizing the alphabet as a learned out- of- body entity, the artists’ work in this exhibition captures the moment “in-between” linear thought processes where cognition begins.

Applying their own language by proxy of medium, the artists draw upon intuitive experiences to then cultivate and paraphrase original content derived from the alphabet. Observed in a state of constant motion, the artwork calls to action a desire to evolve the fixed notions of the alphabetic character and its syntax.

Collectively, the artworks in this exhibition demonstrate desires to construe and categorize as well as discard and destroy. What is ultimately created through these different processes is the possibility for new interpretations and insights. The attempt to make something new and unfamiliar reflects the ongoing search to create what cannot be defined. To quote John Rajchman, “For what is new is in fact not what is in fashion, but what we can’t yet conceive, can’t yet see, or have the sure means to judge - which is just why it forces us to think and think together.”

Anna Breininger addresses aspiration and boundaries as they relate to taste and means through an index of forms derived from common interior patterns. Viewing a surface as a vehicle to define identities; a space on which we project desires, Breininger discovers relationships between painting and the ornamental. In doing so, Breininger’s library of reimagined forms invert meaning. Geometry now becomes a device for fluidity and the structural works in service of the decorated surface.

Julia Haft-Candell is curious about approaching the alphabet as a grouping of symbols. Letters are records of deliberate hand movements from which we have learned to derive or create meaning. In her work, she questions why these specific shapes were chosen as opposed to infinite other shapes; for example, adding a leg to an 'E,' rendering it meaningless, or slowly coil-building a cursive letter out of clay to fully understand the bends in its shape.

Molly Larkey’s work speaks to our human condition as bound in contradiction, even as it rejects the dichotomous, and insists on fluidity of form and function. It longs for a language that names the subjectobject, the malefemale, the richpoor, the blackwhite, the allnothing, the infinitelimited. It points to our failed dualistic vocabularies, and how the structures of power that benefit from an either/or have routinely denied the neither/both a space, a name, even a shape or form. To this end, her work combines elements of language, painting, and sculpture in an act of imaginative rebellion that opens up possibilities for revolutionary thought.

Lindsay August-Salazar has been investigating and developing a non auditory/ phonetic, glyphic like language, parallel to something that we call an alphabet, entitled ACC (Abstract Character Copies) that attempts to discern the differences within repetition and return. Perhaps to magnify or even carve out the space between the primal, the struggle, and artificial solutions. Through bold color, repetition and architectural division of space, her work attempts to highlight or visually depict this embodied “in-between”.

Feodor Voronov creates optical terrains that splinter and twist around the central image of a word. Voronov investigates the nature of repetition in both form and language by painting harlequin patterns that are at once organic and methodical - an analysis of the human experience that borders on familiar but is clearly unique. Voronov toys with the formal aesthetics of the written word, evaluating its psychological roots in symbolism à la Magritte, while also embellishing upon the intrinsic habit of mark-making in the vein of Cy Twombly.

- Chinatown Summer Nights is also scheduled for August 20th and more information is available on their website (http://chinatownsummernights.com/).

- Artist talk September 17, 2016 5pm
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