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Fellowes Farm Equine Clinic Ltd
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Ragwort - help the BHS discover the real facts

DOES RAGWORT MATTER TO YOU?
Every year, the BHS are inundated with ragwort concerns from equestrians, many of whom invest large amounts of time and money in trying to control the weed. 

Therefore, the BHS are delighted to announce an exciting new project, in association with Defra, to discover the real facts about ragwort and gather data from across England on perceptions and reality. 

The results will inform measures to ensure the appropriate use of the Weeds Act 1959, the Animal Welfare Act 2006 and other relevant legislation – so it’s crucial that you use your voice and help them make a difference. Please complete the survey below, and ask friends and family to do the same. The survey will close on 15 August 2014 - so don't delay.

The BHS are delighted that so many people are keen to contribute their thoughts and experiences via the survey. As ever, ragwort in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland is taken very seriously. However, in line with Defra's requirements, this particular work focuses on England only. BHS hope that this project will help make a difference in the other regions, too, and will continue to look for opportunities to take action throughout the UK.

As the UK’s largest equestrian charity, the BHS couldn’t carry out work like this without members’ support. To find out what membership could offer you in return from as little as £35 per year, check out the packages available.

READY TO HELP?

Complete the survey now http://www.bhs.org.uk/ragwort
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Equine health survey receives "phenomenal" response

Threefold increase in response to the National Equine Health Survey

Animal charity the Blue Cross has reported a threefold increase in the number of responses to the annual National Equine Health Survey (NEHS).

This year, data on common horse health problems was collected from 12,301 horses, ponies, donkeys and mules in the UK. This represents a staggering 300 per cent increase on last year's figure of 4,730.

NEHS was first launched in 2010 by the Blue Cross and BEVA and has since become an annual survey.

Data is now being analysed by vets at the Royal Veterinary College. Results will be published later this summer and the results used to determine priorities for future research, training and education.

Findings will also hold the answer to some topical questions on equine infectious diseases, ragwort and atypical myopathy.

Blue Cross education officer Gemma Taylor said: "This year we have been overwhelmed by the phenomenal level of response. Not only are we grateful to the major equestrian organisations for their support but we would also like to thank every individual owner or keeper who took part. 

"It is only with your continued help that we can make a difference to the future health of our precious horses."
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Over the past two years an incredible 22,000 horses and ponies have been tested for Cushing’s disease through the Talk About Laminitis voucher scheme. This has provided a fantastic opportunity to learn more about Cushing’s disease.

Robust statistical analysis of the results of these tests have indicated that as well as laminitis there are other symptoms which could indicate your horse or pony is at increased risk of Cushing’s disease: 

• Having an abnormal hair coat such as longer, dull or coarse 
hairs or delayed hair shedding 
• A presence of fat around the eyes (supraorbital fat) 
• Muscle wastage or loss of muscle.

If you notice laminitis or any of these clinical signs, either on their own or in combination, then you should ask your vet to test for Cushing’s disease. You can download your voucher for the free Cushing’s test laboratory fees from www.talkaboutlaminitis.co.uk
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We have seen an increase in laminitic cases here at the clinic over the past few weeks. What are you doing to help your horses from developing this painful and crippling disease? 

To help you spot the signs and when to call the vet, follow this link to our website http://www.merialvetsite.com/sites/fellowes/FactsheetsEquineHealthOnline1523.html
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Lucky Kristale is due to have a scan on Monday as connections attempt to discover why she came home lame after the Coronation Stakes at Royal Ascot.https://www.facebook.com/fellowesfarm?ref=profile
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Stuart and Matthew spent two days last week in Cardiff at the XLVets AGM. The practice has been a member of XLEquine since April this year and it’s clear already that being part of this group will have real benefits for all of our clients. XLEquine spans the length and breadth of the UK, with its member practices working together to share, experience, knowledge, ideas and skills in order to define and deliver the highest standards of equine health, care and welfare. It comprises a collaborative group of over 100 equine vets endeavouring to be nationally recognised as the 'quality mark' for veterinary care for horses, ponies and donkeys. For more information go to http://www.xlequine.co.uk/
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The owner of a colt who died after being spooked by a low-flying military helicopter is calling on the Ministry of Defence (MOD) to avoid training over heavily populated equine areas.

Sally Earnshaw found her yearling, Chino, lying on the wrong side of his post-and-rail fencing in March.

She believes he was spooked by a low flying MOD helicopter that flew over the family’s Gloucestershire farm the previous evening.

“It was a horrific shock. We found him gasping and unable to get up,” said Mrs Earnshaw.

The horse had broken his back and was put down. She wrote to the MOD, pointing out the dangers and put in a claim for the vet’s fees.

She received a letter confirming helicopters had been in her area, but stating it was not possible to avoid flying over less populated areas.

The MOD said they avoid towns, cities, hospitals, industrial sites and Riding for the Disabled Association stables, but cannot add any other restrictions.

Mrs Earnshaw said 2 low-flying aircraft came over her manège recently when her daughter was schooling a 5-year-old. She wants the MOD to “give us more respect”.

An MOD spokesman said: “Every effort is made to minimise disruption to the local community, however, the MOD has a high level of commitments that require demanding training .”

The MOD will pay “reasonable ex-gratia compensation”, where a link can be established between military aircraft activity and any loss or injury sustained.

Sheila Hardy, of the British Horse Society (BHS), told H&H the organisation has worked closely with the MOD to try to avoid such incidents.

“We know the MOD takes these matters very seriously.”

Tel: 0800 515544 to find out if low-flying is in your area

www.horseandhound.co.uk
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This horse ended up spending the afternoon on a balcony after a man determined it was the safest place to be.

Wacky Borys Kozlowski had borrowed the stallion, called Dolina, from a friend and was worried that he would be targeted by thieves if not stored properly.

The 48-year-old from Grajewo, Poland then made the conscious decision to keep the animal on the elevated terrace until his owner returned.

It wasn't long before he'd caught the attention of passers-by who were shocked to see the horse on the perch.

Borys explained that he concocted the plan after borrowing the bronco to mow overgrown grass.

He explained: "I didn't want anybody to steal the horse. It did a great job on the lawn, and I wouldn't leave the lawnmower lying around either."

When he finally got around to trimming the green he discovered that the lawnmower had given up the ghost.

He said: "I saw a pal of mine while I was trying to fix it, and he told me I should forget the lawnmower and power up his horse, Dolina.

"I thought it seemed like a good idea, and as the horse was only a short way away anyway. We went and fetched it and then he left me with the horse tethered in the garden eating the grass. As well as short grass, I got some fertiliser as well.

"Afterwards he hadn't come back and I didn't want anyone to pinch the animal, so I took it up stairs and through my flat and left on the balcony."

Passerby Jacek Cimoch said: "I was walking down the street when I noticed a horse standing on the balcony.

"I took out my phone and took a photo and put it on Facebook."

The horse owner Jakob Pancesky collected the animal a short while later, and said: "He is a bit of a character. He has never been frightened of anything in his life - you can fire a starting pistol next to him and he would only turn and look at you.

"I guess a flight of steps was no big deal to him."

www.mirror.co.uk
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A rescue horse has overcome a difficult start and risen to success in a thrilling new sport 

A rescue horse who started life as a neglected and malnourished foal, has found her feet in a new sport called horse boarding, with the help of her new owner Rachel Simington.

Candy was just 14 months old when she was found by international horse charity World Horse Welfare, standing over her collapsed and emaciated mother. The mother and daughter pair were rescued, along with another youngster, and the three horses underwent a rigorous rehabilitation programme.

Miraculously, all three horses made a full recovery and Candy was rehomed with thrill-seeking Rachel in 2012.

Candy and Rachel began training and competing in horse boarding, an adrenaline-fuelled sport founded in 2004 by Horse Boarding UK. The sport involves participants being towed behind their horse at speeds of up to 35mph on an off-road skateboard, whilst the rider and boarder work together to control speed and acceleration.

Before long the pair were winning competitions all over the country and Candy gained confidence in her new surroundings.

Rachel says: “People see the sport and think their horse has got to be at competition level to take part but that is simply not true. [Candy] could barely even canter before we started boarding together which limited us when it came to activities like jumping and dressage.

“With the boarding it’s different because she has to focus and really think about turning and moving through obstacles with the boarder behind her, so she doesn’t worry about the cantering part. It just goes to show that you don’t need a certain type of horse to compete at this sport. It has taught me that with time and patience, anything can be achieved.”

World Horse Welfare hosts Horse Boarding UK’s "Have a Go" sessions at its Hall Farm Rescue and Rehoming Centre in Norfolk on selected Sundays. For information about taking part, call Hall Farm on 01953 499 100 to find out more.

Photo from MRCVS
Photo: A rescue horse has overcome a difficult start and risen to success in a thrilling new sport 

A rescue horse who started life as a neglected and malnourished foal, has found her feet in a new sport called horse boarding, with the help of her new owner Rachel Simington.

Candy was just 14 months old when she was found by international horse charity World Horse Welfare, standing over her collapsed and emaciated mother. The mother and daughter pair were rescued, along with another youngster, and the three horses underwent a rigorous rehabilitation programme.

Miraculously, all three horses made a full recovery and Candy was rehomed with thrill-seeking Rachel in 2012.

Candy and Rachel began training and competing in horse boarding, an adrenaline-fuelled sport founded in 2004 by Horse Boarding UK. The sport involves participants being towed behind their horse at speeds of up to 35mph on an off-road skateboard, whilst the rider and boarder work together to control speed and acceleration.
 
Before long the pair were winning competitions all over the country and Candy gained confidence in her new surroundings.
 
Rachel says: “People see the sport and think their horse has got to be at competition level to take part but that is simply not true. [Candy] could barely even canter before we started boarding together which limited us when it came to activities like jumping and dressage.
 
“With the boarding it’s different because she has to focus and really think about turning and moving through obstacles with the boarder behind her, so she doesn’t worry about the cantering part. It just goes to show that you don’t need a certain type of horse to compete at this sport. It has taught me that with time and patience, anything can be achieved.”
 
World Horse Welfare hosts Horse Boarding UK’s "Have a Go" sessions at its Hall Farm Rescue and Rehoming Centre in Norfolk on selected Sundays. For information about taking part, call Hall Farm on 01953 499 100 to find out more.

Photo from MRCVS
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Budweiser horses downtown Vancouver! Always so fun to see them up close... Dalmatian dog and all...
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