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Fast Draw 101 with Howard Darby
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fast draw shooting instruction videos learning quick howard darby
fast draw shooting instruction videos learning quick howard darby

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How to form a Fast Draw club, find a shooting location, attract members, and promote your club.
https://youtu.be/hOR-My9j_QY
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This was missed when I originally created the video a month ago, so posting now:

Top level shooters of the cowboy style of Fast Draw competing at the Masters Championship of the World's Fastest Professional Gunfighters share tips on guns and holster placement, and how to maximize speed and accuracy. This is the second in "The Masters Series" of videos filmed with these shooters.

I'd like to thank Kodiak Schneider, Craig Pittenger, Bubba Chris Feeback, Marshal Cooper, Cisko Guerra, Levi Jordan, Robert Norvelle, Dean Walters and The-Gun Slinger for sharing their knowledge. Make sure to subscribe on YouTube or the Fast Draw 101 Facebook page to be informed of new videos as they appear.

https://youtu.be/OImphbT8qdg
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Robert "Hell on Wheels" Norvelle explains how he positions his Fast Draw holster on his wheelchair.

https://youtu.be/yuntehdUfQ4
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Top level shooters share their tips for new shooters.

This is the fourth and final video in the "Masters Series" filmed with these shooters. I'd like to thank Kodiak, Marshal Cooper, Shaniko, Master Gunfighter, South Fork Slim and Kid Creggar for sharing their knowledge.

https://youtu.be/AlH0L-ARAyY
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Top level shooters share their mental process for preparing to compete, and getting on the light faster.

This is the third of four videos in the "Masters Series" filmed with these shooters. I'd like to thank Kodiak, Kid Creggar, Marshal Cooper, Shaniko, Master Gunfighter, Hell on Wheels, and South Fork Slim for sharing their knowledge.

https://youtu.be/PnhbVCJfI-A
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Top level shooters of the cowboy style of Fast Draw competing at the Masters Championship of the World's Fastest Professional Gunfighters share their practice routines. This is the first in the "Masters Series" of videos filmed with these shooters.

I'd like to thank Kodiak, Kid Creggar, Colt McCoy, The Gun Slinger, Marshal Cooper, Shaniko, Master Gunfighter, Rodeo Romeo, Hell on Wheels, and South Fork Slim for sharing their knowledge. Make sure to subscribe on YouTube or the Fast Draw 101 Facebook page to be informed of new videos as they appear.

https://youtu.be/LLJxyUhQHvo
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Bob Arganbright, the Fast Draw champion, historian, and writer describes the history and evolution of the Fast Draw holster in this Fast Draw 101 video at https://youtu.be/DDBUtPk5WZE

Thank you for the videos and pictures provided by Bob Arganbright, Nick Quick, Bob Mernickle Holsters, Bob Crismon & Greg Custodio.
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I'm working with Bob Arganbright on a video about the history and evolution of the Fast Draw holster, which will appear later this month or early next month, but until then I thought I'd share a Fast Draw 101 "Quick Shot" video about how the sport of Fast Draw got it's start - https://youtu.be/yygOPxDXXoQ
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Did you ever wonder if cutting down your hammer spring or replacing it with a reduced power spring would slow down your times? I always did, so today spent a few hours conducting experiments to find out.

HOW I ANALYZED THE IMPACT OF THE SPRING STRENGTH ON SHOOTING TIMES:
I used my GoPro camera at 240 frames per second so I could watch frame-by-frame playback on my computer to analyze how long it took for the hammer to fall. I also analyzed my reaction times using a timer that would stop when the hammer hit the frame. I tested each gun/spring combination at least 10 times, which allowed me to get a good average of total time for my reactions and the hammer fall. Assuming a pretty consistent average reaction time, any differences in my times should be a result of spring power.

WHAT I TESTED:
I used a few different guns, including a couple of WFDA fanners and a couple of CFDA thumbers, and tried them with different hammer springs. All guns were Ruger Blackhawks or Vaqueros. I tested a stock Ruger spring with 28 coils, a slightly cut down spring with 26 coils, a competition spring with 21 coils (I have this in most of my guns), and a very low power spring of 19 coils that barely ignites a primer.

THE RESULTS:
With the same spring strength in the different guns I saw pretty much the same results in all guns. This allowed me to confirm that the testing was consistent when using the same spring, and would be a pretty good indicator when comparing the different spring tensions and the times. The comparison of the different tension springs provided these results for the hammer to fall from full cock:

- Guns with the stock 28 coil spring had a hammer fall time of about 12 thousandths of a second (.012).
- Guns with the slightly cut down 26 coil spring had a hammer fall very slightly slower than the 12 thousandths of the 28 coil spring (slightly over .012).
- Guns with my competition springs with 21 coils had a hammer fall averaging 14 thousandths (.014).
- Guns with the very reduced 19 coil spring had a hammer fall average of 17 thousandths (.017).

The gun with the stock 28 coil spring had way too much tension to use in a fast draw gun for most people, as was 26 coils, so I'm going to say that the fastest you may get away with in a competition gun is maybe .013 for the hammer fall if you go with a 24 coil spring.

The 19 coil spring was probably too under powered for most guns - it was almost fully extended with very little compression when the hammer was down against the frame. This would probably not be a reliable tension to use in your competition gun. Also, you'll notice that the hammer times step up quite a bit below 21 coils, so you are giving up more time when the hammer barely has enough force to operate correctly. A 20 coils spring is probably the lowest you would want to go with (although I'll stick with 21 to make sure to not cut it too close), which would probably be about .015 hammer fall.

WHAT THIS MEANS TO YOU:
The items above being the case, the hammer fall times for the  strongest usable spring is around .013, and the weakest usable spring is around .015, meaning you may pick up 2 thousandths of a second (.002) by using a strong hammer if your competitor is using the weakest hammer. Probably not enough to worry about.

If these experiments produced any really interesting results I was going to do a video on it, but since the results were pretty underwhelming I'm just posting here in case others were interested in this as well. If anyone has any other tests of how hammer spring tension impacts your time I'd be interested in hearing it.

At least I know now that using a cut down hammer spring really doesn't have enough impact on speed to be concerned about it.
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