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Fadhel Hawramany
Dermatologist / Rizgary Teaching Hospital /Erbil /Kurdistan /Iraq .
Dermatologist / Rizgary Teaching Hospital /Erbil /Kurdistan /Iraq .
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Crested Cat Ears
Cyanotis cristata
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Spotted by sunnyjosef.
http://buff.ly/2lPFpir
Via Project Noah
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Giant Snowdrop
Galanthus elwesii
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A beautiful Giant Snowdrop (Galanthus elwesii) popping out of the snow..
Spotted by KostasZontanos
http://buff.ly/2lPKk33
Via Project Noah
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Wallum Banksia
Banksia aemula
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Banksias (family Proteaceae) are native to Australia, and as heavy producers of nectar are an important food source for all sorts of native wildlife.
Spotted by Neil Ross.
http://buff.ly/2lPKS96
Via Project Noah
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Heart Island on Lake Mascardi..
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Lago Mascardi is a lake in the northern part of Argentine Patagonia. The body of water lies within Nahuel Huapi National Park, a 2-million acre preserve in the Andean foothills. This wilderness area is popular with outdoor enthusiasts, who come to fish, kayak, hike, bike, camp and climb. Mascardi itself is V-shaped. At the bottom of the V sits the aptly-named Isla Corazon, or Heart Island. The island, which looks exactly like a heart when seen from the eastern side of the valley surrounding the lake, is covered with trees.

The national park has a good infrastructure for hiking, and it is accessible via the local highway, Route 40. Mascardi is not the only lake in the area. Together with neighboring waterways, it's part of the Bariloche Lake District. Isla Corazon has become a particularly popular stop for in-love paddlers, who float along the shore taking pictures. Some people even come here to propose. Also, because of the nearby topography and elevation, the lakes are good for kitesurfing and sailing.
Via http://www.mnn.com/lifestyle/eco-tourism/photos/heart-shaped-islands-inspire-your-next-vacation/heart-island-lake-mascardi
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Ruff!
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There aren't many wading birds with as impressive of a courtship display as the male ruff. During breeding season, the males flash large collars of ornamental neck feathers — the origin of their name — and try to attract the attention of females.
Gathering in a lek, the males flash their feathers, flutter their wings, jump and otherwise perform for the ladies. But interestingly, there are three types of males that compete at leks and each have a different type of plumage.
Territorial males represent about 84 percent of the male population, and they sport dark feathers. They're faithful to their lekking grounds and can be seen there year after year. About 15 percent of the male population is made up of satellite males, which sport white or light ruffs. They don't have a territory, but arrive at the leks of territorial males.
And about 1 percent of the population is made of of males that mimic the appearance females. They are distinguishable from females in that they're bigger than the average female and have testes that are 2.5 times the volume of other males.
These rare males, called faeders, may look just like females to us, but analysis of lekking behavior suggests that both male and female ruffs aren't fooled. Without the ruffed plumage to parade around, faeders wait for a chance to mate with females when other males are distracted.
According to Earth Touch News Network, "The mysteries of how and why this unusual sexual mimicry system is maintained are still being worked out...[Dr. David] Lank and collaborators discovered that the faeder type is carried by an autosomal-dominant allele, meaning females as well as males can inherit it. If inherited by females, Lank explains, it results in 'mini females' much smaller than the norm."
Faeders are the first permanent female mimic reported among birds, though it was also recently discovered to occur among marsh harriers as well.
From impressive courtship plumage to female mimicry, ruffs are a stand-out among waders.
Via http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/animals/blogs/14-photos-show-wonderful-diversity-wading-birds
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Snow Crocus
Crocus chrysanthus
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An early sign of spring, this Snow Crocus (Crocus chrysanthus). This species with vivid orange-yellow bowl-shaped flowers is native to the Balkans and Turkey. It owes its name to a very early flowering period, often emerging through the snow in late winter. Spotted near Thessaloniki, Greece, by Project Noah member Kostas Zontanos. http://buff.ly/2lnQlTV
Via Project Noah
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Hyacinth Macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus)!
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Photo by Fabio Rage: http://ow.ly/bqS43085U77
The Hyacinth Macaw is the largest parrot in the world and easily one of the most spectacular. Learn more on Neotropical Birds: http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu/portal/species/overview?p_p_spp=53716
Via Neotropical Birds
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Simple Sarota
Sarota acantus
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From furry legs to bright orange undersides streaked with metallic silver bands, what's not to like about the Simple Sarota (Sarota acantus)?! The Sarota jewelmarks belong to the family Riodinidae, and comprise a total of 20 species of butterflies, distributed from Mexico to Bolivia. Find out more here: http://buff.ly/2jSHfj8
Spotted in Costa Rica by Project Noah member José Miguel Diaz.
http://buff.ly/2jSGhDG
Via Project Noah
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Collared Trogon (Trogon collaris)!
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Photo by Rafy Rodriguez: http://ow.ly/rZTw3078y9d
The Collared Trogon is a common trogon of humid lowland forests of Central and South America.
Via Neotropical Birds
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Black-Tailed Prairie Dog
Cynomys ludovicianus
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It's winter across the northern hemisphere, and a large part of the United States has snow right now. These black-tailed prairie dogs from Oklahoma seem to enjoy playing in it.
Spotted by SargonR
http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/1400229822
Via Project Noah
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