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Esohe Denise Odaro
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Esohe Denise Odaro

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Actions speak louder than words! If you feel avoided by someone, then get the message that they simply do not care about you! Respect yourself enough to walk away!Why? Because you deserve better!
#lifetalks  
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Esohe Denise Odaro

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Patrice Lumumba served as prime minister of the Democratic Republic of Congo for less than three months in 1960, when it gained independence from Belgium. Half a century later his memory still haunts the country. Joe Wright’s English-language revival of “A Season in the Congo”, a 1966 play by Aimé Césaire, at the Young Vic in London, is a tribute to the leader who all too briefly held the hopes of a nation http://econ.st/16v48cW
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Did you go see it? 
Have her in circles
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Self explanatory: Nigeria should win the world cup! 
An economist has developed a utilitarian index to determine which country’s victory would bring the most happiness.
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Esohe Denise Odaro

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"A man sat at a metro station in Washington DC and started to play the violin; it was a cold January morning. He played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time, since it was rush hour, it was calculated that 1,100 people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.

Three minutes went by, and a middle aged man noticed there was musician playing. He slowed his pace, and stopped for a few seconds, and then hurried up to meet his schedule.

A minute later, the violinist received his first dollar tip: a woman threw the money in the till and without stopping, and continued to walk.

A few minutes later, someone leaned against the wall to listen to him, but the man looked at his watch and started to walk again. Clearly he was late for work.

The one who paid the most attention was a 3 year old boy. His mother tagged him along, hurried, but the kid stopped to look at the violinist. Finally, the mother pushed hard, and the child continued to walk, turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. All the parents, without exception, forced them to move on.

In the 45 minutes the musician played, only 6 people stopped and stayed for a while. About 20 gave him money, but continued to walk their normal pace. He collected $32. When he finished playing and silence took over, no one noticed it. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.

No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the most talented musicians in the world. He had just played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, on a violin worth $3.5 million dollars.

Two days before his playing in the subway, Joshua Bell sold out at a theater in Boston where the seats averaged $100.

This is a real story. Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste, and priorities of people. The outlines were: in a commonplace environment at an inappropriate hour: Do we perceive beauty? Do we stop to appreciate it? Do we recognize the talent in an unexpected context?

One of the possible conclusions from this experience could be:

If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world playing the best music ever written, how many other things are we missing?"

Share if you took the time to read this 
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And...guess what my girlfriend was dating him when he did this! Amazing yes? He is an amazing performer. I am always late to things as I am a sucker for live music. Good reminder to stop and enjoy the moment!

Esohe Denise Odaro

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"In many ways, of course, the environment has become more welcoming to young women who want to study science and math."

From academics who make a point of encouraging female students, to women creating their own networks, Eileen Pollack examines in depth how a changing culture has helped more women excel in the sciences, and what is still holding back the rest.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/06/magazine/why-are-there-still-so-few-women-in-science.html?pagewanted=1&_r=0&ref=business

Supportive peer groups and mentors have been cited as a major factor in helping women push into the sciences. At the World Economic Forum, for example, women make up the majority of the Young Scientist community, which brings together the leading scientists of the future:

http://www.weforum.org/news/40-young-scientists-be-honoured-world-economic-forum-s-summer-davos

Is a change in culture the key to parity?
Hint: The answer has more to do with "The Big Bang Theory" than with longstanding theories about men's so-called natural aptitude.
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Wow. Didn't get through the whole article but it was incredibly interesting to hear her story. 
 
 
It has been a long time coming. But then the fifth assessment of the state of the global climate by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a United Nations body, was a behemoth of an undertaking. The first tranche of the multi-volume IPCC report was released in Stockholm on September 27th. And it is categorical in its conclusion: climate change has not stopped and man is the main cause http://econ.st/1av3vm8 
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Esohe Denise Odaro

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Oscar Peterson Trio Night Train ( Full Album ) #TheJazzSet  
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Have her in circles
132 people
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President, The Federal Republic of Goodwill, Lover of Fried Plantain, Cloudy Apple juice and Daydreaming
Skills
daydreaming....and dreaming big
Story
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Inspired to live a life sans regret
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Female