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Eric Rhoads
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Eric Rhoads

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There is a term for someone with "a sierra of them in one room, an Everest in another; hulks in the kitchen, heaps in the hallway..." and that term is hoarder.

Otherwise, I think the author makes a few critical errors. The value of a book isn't the dead cellulose its printed on, its, to quote MLK, _"the contents of their character", aka their ideas contained on the pages. Whether that book is made of clay, vellum,  paper, or silicon is irrelevant and does not depreciate the inherent value.

The second error made is that those books do not represent you, the reader, they respresent the ideas of others to which you agree with. You, the reader, are a synthesis of the two, just as you are not precisely what you eat.
Why we need physical books.
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Eric Rhoads

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All reviews are good reviews in the sense that they all raise awareness. A well written negative review can be a positive review for someone else. People tastes in books are subjective just as the task of reviewing is subjective. The only review I would consider a 'bad' review is a poorly written piece that fails to articulate the reviewer's negative opinion in a useful manner.
We've all spent some time checking out online reviews. While businesses want nothing but good reviews, a new study shows that sometimes mixed reviews can actually help drive up sales. Here's why.
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Regardless of the outcome, the trial is proof that even in the rarefied world of Silicon Valley venture capitalism, the work place can be just as toxic and crappy as any run of the mill minimum wage retail job despite the window dressing of business buzzwords and meritocracy mumbo-jumbo.
Statistics offer no clear win, but Kleiner has best record on female board members.
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Why doesn't Apple want to talk? The transition to mobile is a good example of why. That transition put serious constraints on ad revenue. When the primary side effect of using the Apple Watch is that you use your iPhone less, I imagine this doesn't sit well with some developers. The Apple Watch screen will be a very precious commodity that will be tightly managed...and highly priced.
Yesterday Tim Cook showed off all the things you can do with an Apple Watch. You can transmit your heartbeat and open your garage door; you can summon an Uber and peruse Instagram. Basically, you...
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Eric Rhoads

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...and Apple doesn't want your dollars, they want your Apple dollars via Apple Pay.

Apple makes nice products and does innovative things. They do it for Bananas money though and I don't care to be that privileged.
Tim Cook and other members of the Apple team used the word privilege a handful of times during today's Apple Event. The word usually signified graciousness, like "It's a privilege to be here" or...
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Eric Rhoads

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It is a good thing that I have a high level of confidence that the Nook is a stable brand here for the long haul. Otherwise, why would ever purchase an ebook from B&N under these terms?

Queue The Talking Heads - "Burning Down the House"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8D4AsLzlM0
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Have them in circles
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Eric Rhoads

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I review the excellent Veil of the Deserters by +Jeff Salyards.
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Eric Rhoads

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_"Barnes and Noble has been cleaning house in the Nook Media division over the course of the last fourteen months. 
...
Barnes and Noble is now focusing on hiring core executives to chart the future direction of Nook from startup and heavy digital backgrounds."_

What will be left by the time they have finished this transition?

In the same period of time, look what Rakuten has done with their Kobo brand. They have released new hardware, improved their web presence, took over Sony's customers, and bought out Overdrive.

If B&N needs a template for future success, Rakuten is a good example to follow until they (B&N) can develop their own digital identity.
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I agree that Apple is attempting to move into a new space beyond consumer electronics. I agree that fashion makes sense because it builds on the existing brand value, dovetails nicely with Apple's values, and ensures a high profit margin.

What I disagree with is why Apple is doing this. I think this is a survival move by Apple. The value of computing is plummeting. It becoming a less than commodity item. Look no further than cloud computing and the Raspberry Pi 2. Think about it, you can buy a full functional computer these days for less than the cost of the mouse and keyboard. That is how ridiculously cheap computing has become.

Apple needs to provide consumers a reason to buy their product. The plummeting cost of computing makes their traditional argument of 'it just works' a harder sell. Now, they are pivoting to an aspirational brand, a life style brand, a luxury brand. Apple products now/will have value beyond their functional use.

This trend will accelerate. Apple is uniquely positioned to have both the talent and money to perform this pivot. The question is whether Samsung, HTC, Huawaei, Lenovo, etc have the means to do so?

Apple's classic nemesis, Microsoft, is already in the midst of such a pivot, though in its case to services, as it moves away from the traditional compute workhorse of desktop computers. Traditional software offerings such as Windows and Office are becoming software as a service platforms.

I think Apple's transition will be the hardest. Fashion and luxury are fickle. It will demand that Apple is simple better than everyone else around them. Thus far, they have been.
Apple Watch is but a first step…
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Eric Rhoads

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When you look at this, you realize how important Apple Pay is to the Apple Watch. It is the killer application. Otherwise, you are wearing a really well made - and expensive - notification screen on your wrist. 
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Eric Rhoads

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I doubt anything so transformative will happen in 2015. It may set the industry on a new path but the transformation will take years. Congressional bills take time to pass and even more time to implement. Lawsuits can be appealed, delayed, etc.

The music publishers have the most to loose in this whole mess. Their unwillingness to embrace change (aka the internet) has allowed other stakeholders to control that change. Publishers have allowed consumers to suddenly realize that paying $12-20 per album is ridiculous.

What should appear even more dire to publishers is that in the past few years, the structures and mechanisms (Patreon, Kickstarter, etc) have arisen to allow artists to fund themselves without the onerous burdens of a publishing contract. This nascent industry will continue to grow regardless of the current Congressional bills and Justice Department lawsuits.

What does all this mean? If publishers win big this year, it may be a Pyrrhic victory. Now more than ever, artists have viable alternates to the publishing industry. Now more than ever, are consumers unwilling to pay big money for music to support the publishing industry. Now more than ever, people listen to not only more music, but greater varieties.

The music industry is large and complex. It will take time to change. But, I think one thing is certain, without owning that change and instead fighting blindly against it, something unexpected will happen.
The music business has been screwed up for a hopelessly long time, but change is afoot: Congress, courts and the Justice Department are all poised in coming months to shake up how companies and consumers pay for music. The big question, though, is whether this flurry of activity will produce a rational royalty system — or just make…
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Have them in circles
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Sabina Mancini's profile photo
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