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Stranger than fiction - nested secret societies with secrets hidden in centuries-old cipher manuscripts, and was Freemasonry founded as a joke?
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11 comments
 
Discordianism sounds more on the money after reading that...
 
The thing that amazed me most (we're living in the future-- I expect technology to be cool-- was that there was a time when a high proportion of people were in secret societies.
Andy S
 
Interesting stuff, a bit surprised that the software used seems limited to analysing characters that need to be manually inputted rather than optically recognised. I mean, I have software on my phone that can translate on the fly from live images of text in foreign language (badly mind), it doesn't seem that outlandish to think that the next step of pattern recgognition matching against known language would be a fairly simple next step? Ha! How little I probably understand about language!!
 
HA! I knew about all this decades ago. Read it in The Necronomicon...
 
+Andy S a bit surprised that the software used seems limited to analysing characters that need to be manually inputted rather than optically recognised.

"Recognized" implies matching against something known.  OCR scans images looking for matches against existing patterns present in the software's database.  You can't use OCR on something like this because no referents exist.
Andy S
 
OCR will try to recognise known characters, of which there is likely great variation and results will vary. The important thing I would think is that the technology could differentiate between the different characters, regardless of whether they are real or not, and record something for a given character that is not duplicated by another character in the cypher. Once something is recorded, albeit equally nonsensical initially, patterns can then be sought and decryption methods applied. The step of manually naming squiggles/cypher characters then manually inputting them seems a tad pointelss to me...
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