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Eric Nieudan
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Typity type.
Typity type.

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Well these are the coolest. I hope they're available separately some time.
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Today +Sinead Mc Donald used my plot mapping cards to teach media writing to second years. She reported 40 giggling students. I'll take it as a win.
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In case your missed this: compiled advice for running old school games, but formatted as an Apocalypse World MC agenda. Very useful.
So here's a thing I've been working on. It is an Apocalypse Engine-style list of GM Principles for running OSR-style games in PbtA or rules-light systems, primarily cobbled together from writing by +Ben Milton and Steven Lumpkin. I've got it in a state that I'm only marginally hesitant to expose to an arbitrary number of eyes. I’ve reached that point where I don't feel like it's quite finished, but my eyes glaze over when looking at it. In particular, I think there may be some principles or references remaining that might be too specific for the spirit of the collection.

I’m also wary of the apparent tension between nominal PbtA playstyles and OSR playstyles, especially in the light of recent blog posts from prominent folks in the respective communities. I’m certain that there is overlap these styles somewhere in ludic space, but in its current state, this document is kind of orthogonal to the search for it. I feel like I should do more to directly address this, though I don’t know if I should heap on further disclaimers in the document itself. Perhaps I should just strip out the references to PbtA and focus on rules-light games and folks new to running the original games without the implicit/historical context.

Feel free to post opinions here, and proofing suggestions and comments to the doc itself. Thanks!
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I needed a notebook for writing in the (literal) field, so I made this in a hurry.
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9/20/17
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Hot from the mailbox, here's a project I'm glad I backed. More plug and play locations and NPCs for my campaign!
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9/20/17
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Macchiato Monsters Turn Sequence

Sooo, it has become clear that some referees find it hard to run combat in MM (looks intently at +Benoît FELTEN and his HK crew). Initiative-less fights come naturally to me, but maybe they don't to you. So I've made an effort to articulate what happens in my head when I run an action sequence.

1. Start of the turn. The referee describes: the location, the threats, the monsters and what they do (especially who they target, and with how many attacks if necessary). The general situation must be clear to everyone.
2. The first character gets to act - the referee asks their player what they would like to do
¤ Who acts first often depends on the situation. The referee should ask themselves what would happen first. What's more pressing to resolve before the rest can be reevaluated? Who's in front? Who has a crossbow ready to shoot? Who's fallen into the piranha pit?
¤ The character's precise circumstances are made clear by the referee, including risks taken and possible consequences.
3. The character's turn is resolved with a check. Damage is dealt, consequences described.
4. The next character acts.
¤ This should be in order of fictional importance. If there's no emergency or obvious priority, the referee can just go around the table or battle map.
¤ The referee describes the character's precise circumstances, especially if a previous character's turn has had consequences that changed the situation. They might not be shot at anymore, or a spell gone awry may represent a new threat.
5. Repeat 3 and 4 until everyone has had their turn.
6. Have all NPCs done something? If not, the referee describes what they do and gives whoever is affected a chance to react - this can involve an out-of-sequence check, for instance to avoid an attack or spell.
7. End of the turn. The referee updates the description and starts the next turn - go back to 1.

MM referees, does this look familiar to you? Or do you make it happen an entirely different way?

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Wilderness selfie!

A couple days ago I had a Remember that day? type notification from Google photos. It was a selfie I took in this exact place two years ago. I remember posting it with a comment about enjoying being out after a few days stuck in bed. Today I was in the same situation, except I have only spent one day in bed yesterday. Despite feeling weak and braindead, I've been able to go for a walk and do some stuff afterwards.

So yay for slow recovery from a mysterious illness, I guess.
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Ca, c'est plutôt cool.

On ne présente plus les Lapins +Jerome Larre et +Lad Rilia, mais j'ai fait l'expérience du taf de l'association d1 pendant le Game Chef, et ces gens sont très bien aussi. Si vous bossez sur un jeu en ce moment, ou si vous y pensez sérieusement, voilà un excellent moyen de faire des progrès.
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So Ben is making a game using MM. Check out the collection for the cast of characters and a very entertaining AP of the first session.
Dungeon, Inc. Pitch

Since time immemorial, wise ones have wondered about the coherence of these dangerous but lucrative places often called Dungeons. Adventurers explore them, and should they survive the monsters and traps they face, they exit richer than they entrered.

But why do these places exist at all? Why has such a diversity of monsters decided to settle them? Who resets the traps after the last adventurers triggered them? And for that matter, where are the bodies of the last adventurers who failed to survive the traps or monsters? Places that are so easy to hear about (just hit the local tavern or talk to any village chief and rumours will abound pointing to the nearest Dungeon) must after all be much frequented.

The truth known by very few is that Dungeons, or at least the largest of them are actually corporations. They are managed by leaders who recruit monsters, establish the maps of the places they settle in, build traps and handle the visiting adventurers. Why? The oldest reason in the world: money. Adventurers may think they will find riches in dungeons, but in fact they bring in their own wealth: full purses, magical devices or weapons, divine medallions, even golden teeth.

In a nutshell, Dungeon, Inc. kills adventurers and grows rich from their wealth. It’s their business model, at least when things go right. Because such an operation actually requires a lot of money up front and is complex to set up and maintain: one must attract adventurers through the spreading of rumours, the abduction of village children; once in a while, an adventurer must get out enriched, otherwise the lure would grow cold fast. Monsters need to be recruited, traps maintained, places mapped so the monsters know where to find the adventurers and how to best deal with them.

Higher up in the organisation’s hierarchy, investors must be found to expand the Dungeon, and provisions must be made to ensure they will make money too. Employee unrest must be kept at a minimum without salaries exploding. Most importantly perhaps, the organisation must ensure that all of this remains a secret: if adventurers start going around and telling other adventurers it’s all staged to ensure their deaths, it’s not going to be good for the business.

In Dungeon, Inc. you play receivers, part of the Client Services division. Your role is to welcome the adventurers, generally with broad swings of your nailed clubs. You are the Dungeon’s fieldworkers, equipped with maps of the levels where adventurers have been spotted. Your role is to take advantage of the fact you know the terrain to eliminate them as fast as possible. Your aspiration is to spend your stipend in the Dungeon’s company stores, inns and brothels; indeed, the Dungeon is a thoughtful employer and knows your well-being to be paramount.

And who knows, if you do your work really well, you might become Employee of the Month and for a few days have access to the salons and entertainment opportunities of your betters. This is how you get the chance to frequent the cream of the company’s most promising managers in this great family that is Dungeon, Inc.
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Missions et rumeurs au jour 139
- Un groupe de guerriers gnolls a rejoint le camp de réfugiés, ils piaffent en attendant qu'on les accompagne pour libérer les prisonniers des gobelours
- Il y aurait une ancienne crypte humaine quelque part dans la montagne près des cavernes
- Le prêtre de la Fleur Pourpre voulait trouver le "secret de Duvankhu" pour obtenir des pouvoirs nécromantiques
- Les mercenaires yoon-suinois et les nains de Markward offrent leurs services aux aventuriers
- Une troupe de hobgobelins campe près des cavernes
- La compagnie de lanciers envoyée reprendre une cargaison volée par des corbelins a trouvé dans leur repaire des traces d’une religion inconnue
- Pas de nouvelles de la Compagnie dorée, partie dans la montagne des méduses
- Des soldats en patrouille rançonneraient les forestiers
- Une cargaison de café rouge est attendue chez Mezgarosh
- La maison-vortex a quitté sa dernière localisation connue
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