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Eric Jensen
Attended Technical University of Denmark
Lives in Richland, Washington, USA
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Eric Jensen

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Germany's acceptance of the refugees was a wonderful, compassionate act. The many refugees are now marred by the fearmongering of organisations like ISIS. The ideologically correct response is to bear the assault stoically and stick to our values. However, this will inevitably lead to further loss of life. Extremists see their actions as justified whatever they are. ISIS and similar organisations bring shame to themselves and the religion the profess to follow. Military action in order to cripple them economically is a good first step. After their physical cash cows are gone only donations will be left and political and diplomatic skills can minimize that to such a degree they will not be the force they are today.

Just my, amateur, two cents.
Last summer’s #WelcomeRefugees enthusiasm has come back to bite Germany as two murderous rampages by Muslim newcomers this week have put the country on edge
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I've found it interesting to learn about the role that German Guilt played in the decision to let them in. It may have been done with good intent but was a profoundly ignorant and disastrous decision. Especially since most of the refugees weren't actually refugees and 70% or so were single young men. One stat I read was that Germany took in 1,000,000 refugees and migrants in 2015, and suffered an increase of >400,000 crimes over the year before. Europe now has an insidious Islam problem that is only going to lead to increasing levels of blood and death that the authorities seem completely incapable of doing anything about; I wonder when we'll start to see vigilante groups fire-bombing mosques and killing innocent muslims in response? When this happens I also think Merkel has to take the blame. This isn't even really about ISIS either: when you have ghettos and no-go zones in your cities that the State refuses to enter, filled with a culture and people whose values are incompatible with that of the State then multiculturalism has failed. Just my 2 cents. 
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Super geeky😁😁. Super cool!😎😎
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Very cool plan!
Solar power, electric trucks, self driving cars!
*/ The first master plan that I wrote 10 years ago is now in the final stages of completion. It wasn't all that complicated and basically consisted of:
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Other than the extreme defamation laws in pretty oblivious to the internal politics of Turkey. That being said, arresting and/or firing university dean's and employees of the education ministry en-mass seems less like a surgical and measured response to the coup attempt and more like a concerted effort to cripple the voices of highly educated people and to prevent the creation of any more. Still, 16000 people out of 74 million is a very small percentage (~0.02%) so it is possible that this is simply a bias on my side. According to findthedata.com Turkey has a literacy rate above the worldwide average and an education profile similar to most western countries.
The Higher Education Board ordered all deans to resign as part of a crackdown following last weekend's failed coup. Staff from the education ministry and the office of the prime minister were also told to leave.
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This whole process looks more and more like getting rid of anybody against Erdogan.

Nonetheless I think, that long term it was good, that the generals did not succeed, as they did previously.

Short term it means a Turkey more isolated from Europe, and a Turkey with fewer tourist.
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I like the brexit one. #Brexit
Imgur: The most awesome images on the Internet.
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Excellent video about the fallout from Brexit. #Brexit
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I see this as a mostly positive change. Extra security is added and there are no problems in nexus phones. If other providers want to lock their bootloader they might experience a drop in sales from the core nerds, but otherwise everyone is more or less better off.
Android Nougat will begin strictly enforcing verified boot on Android devices, a move that will make it harder for malware to hide on smartphones and tablets. But it could also cause devices with corrupted data or modified bootloaders to fail to boot up.
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More great news about Britain after their infamous referendum.
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It sounds like +Tesla​ has a solid foundation in their claims presented with several reasonable metrics here.
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A new experiment puts odds in favor of Einstein being wrong about hidden variables. The distribution of neutrinos matches superposition rather than the deterministic view of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen.
Bell's inequality is tested again.
In the world of quantum, infinitesimally small particles, weird and often logic-defying behaviors abound. Perhaps the strangest of these is the idea of superposition, in which objects can exist simultaneously in two or more seemingly counterintuitive states. For example, according to the laws of quantum mechanics, electrons may spin both clockwise and counter-clockwise, or be both at rest and excited, at the same time.
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Cool collection this week from +Mark Bruce​!
I've worked with electron lithography (1) and it does not lend itself to mass production very well since it is a serial process (every line is drawn individually like an inkjet printer instead of at the same time like a photograph). Still, the functionalisation potential might prompt research into self-esteem assembled structures for this. I'm thinking this could be used as a sensor in mobile phones. Each time a scan is run a new section is exposed. With tens of thousands of sections it could be a long time before the chip needs to be replaced.
The software improvements of (2) are really cool, especially for brain-machine-interface (BMI) of prosthetics. A simple interface could potentially create better movements. Very cool! Of course I agree with +Samuel Holmes​: robots might become better at walking than us pretty quickly. The evolution programs used to evolve animals that can walk upright might be adapted to develop better and more stable robot legs.
I've been looking forward to (3) for a long time! There are a number of structures that include conductive and nonconductive sections that are better made with 3D printing. Up until now there were limited options for integrating the two.
I was at a talk by one of the leading scientists in the field of brain-connectome maps (4). After taking the high resolution images it still took a lot of people am entire summer to map all the different aspects. Getting a machine-learning algorithm that can do this would be fantastic!
The implications of (5) are fascinating and scary. Just as +Mark Bruce​ I'd be very interested in optogenetic integration, especially for BMI. Light speed transfer of information into and out of brains would be cool. Brain surgery would become psychedelic with a florescent brain. Of course stray light could cause damage (only using a small opening could reduce that). It might be a good way to combat (9)?
Remote drones have all kinds of applications (6)! Aerial surveillance drones have started to be integrated on farms where their different cameras can identify problems before the human eye. Combating disease and invasive species might be more manageable with a fleet of drones, as +Mark Bruce​ mentions. Using robots to manage herds sounds like fun :-)
My favorite, by far, of this week is (7)! Conditions like Alzheimer's are terrible and if early detection can reduce symptoms that is fantastic! A vaccine against Alzheimer's would also be so!
The anti-aging aspects of (8) are interesting, but could maybe also be used in organ transplants. If the new tissue could age or not age based on bodies ability to replace the tissue it could improve the procedure from being a live-in change to being a few years of pills.
Interesting developments in molecular electronics (10). Especially the super thin transistors. If they do not significantly affect each other in the third dimension a very dense, but flexible chip for screens could be made.
Thanks for the digest +Mark Bruce​!
 
SciTech #ScienceSunday Digest - 29/2016.
Permalink here: http://www.scitechdigest.net/2016/07/dna-origami-surfaces-robots-walk-like.html

DNA origami surfaces, Robots walk like humans, Printable metal filament, Machine learning tissue scanning, Transparent skull window, Drone vaccine delivery, Retinal Alzheimer’s detection, Inheriting differential cellular damage, Bacteria in brainstem, Molecular electronics.

1. Precise Surface Functionalisation via DNA Origami
Electron-beam lithography chip fabrication tools can create surfaces etched with photonic crystal cavity arrays, tuned to particular wavelengths of light, that contain up to seven distinct internal surface structures to which precise DNA origami shapes can bind to https://www.caltech.edu/news/dna-origami-lights-microscopic-glowing-van-gogh-51280. With fluorescent molecules (whose light emittance is chosen to match the cavity) attached to specific DNA origami shapes, each cavity can now be precisely filled with from zero to seven fluorescent molecules, and so providing a colour scale with eight shades that the group used to create a dime-sized copy of Van Gogh’s “The Starry Night” containing over 65,000 distinct pixels. This is an exciting platform for building precisely patterned functional surfaces; one can imagine the fluorescent molecules being replaced with sensors, quantum dots, enzymes, and other DNA origami structures, perhaps as mini production lines.

2. Human-Like Robotic Gait
DURUS is a robotic platform recently used to demonstrate hyper-efficient, human-like robotic gait and bipedal locomotion http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/humanoids/durus-brings-humanlike-gait-and-fancy-shoes-to-hyperefficient-robots. DURUS walks nearly 20x more efficiently than the original ATLAS humanoid robot, has human-like heel-toe walking, and can wear human shoes while doing so. The most important facet here is that, while some hardware innovations were involved, the platform is mainly improved software that can be used with different hardware configurations and doesn’t suffer from the same restraints as before. More complex tests are planned for running and walking, and the platform should also prove just as useful in providing much improved prosthetics for amputees.

3. Metal Filament for 3D Printers
Filamet is the name for a new metal-based 3D printing filament launched by The Virtual Foundry that any standard plastic-filament-based 3D deposition printer can use to produce custom metallic objects http://3dprintingindustry.com/news/now-can-print-metal-3d-printer-85255/. The first filaments on offer contain either copper or bronze metallic powder in a resin that is only 11.5% plastic, 88.5% metal, that can be used to print a mostly-metal object that can be polished or else post-processed to remove the remaining plastic to achieve 99%+ pure metal. However, while other metals and even glass and ceramic versions are planned, such objects will be structurally composite in nature and won’t achieve the consistency and strength of a conventional metal object.

4. Machine Learning Tissue Scanning
3Scan is a company that produces knife-edge scanning microscopes for very finely slicing tissue samples and imaging these to produce virtual 3D models, and now plans to use machine learning techniques to further speed up and automate this virtual model reconstruction http://www.xconomy.com/san-francisco/2016/07/11/tissue-analyzer-3scan-builds-out-machine-learning-with-14m-series-b/. This will be particularly interesting for slicing, scanning, and producing ever-larger brain connectome maps in future. Talking of virtual models of neurons and chunks of brain tissue, the Allen Institute for Brain Science has launched the comprehensive Allen Brain Observatory to further boost progress in this area http://www.alleninstitute.org/what-we-do/brain-science/news-press/articles/introducing-allen-brain-observatory.

5. Embedding a Transparent Window in the Skull
A new transparent form of the material yttria-stabilised zirconia was developed as part of the Window into The Brain project, aiming to utilise this material to replace sections of a human skull to allow optical access to the brain whenever needed http://www.gizmag.com/transparent-brain-window/44286/. Recent animal studies show that (i) lasers can pass through the device to not only treat neurons but also destroy bacteria that may be present due to surgery etc, and (ii) the material is tolerated extremely well by the body and avoids inflammation and immune rejection. It’ll be interesting to start to see this used with optogenetics.

6. Remote Vaccine Delivery via Drone
Drones are to be used to deliver vaccine-coated food pellets to remote wilderness areas in order to vaccinate ferrets against a particular disease and prevent their ongoing population decline http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_tense/2016/07/14/u_s_fish_and_wildlife_announces_plan_to_use_drones_and_candy_to_deliver.html. There are some very interesting biocontrol applications here, for example to combat invasive pest species. In related news the robust SwagBot robot has been developed to help remotely herd cattle on large Australian ranches, and might be used to monitor animal health and take samples as needed http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/industrial-robots/swagbot-to-herd-cattle-on-australian-ranches. The group are next looking to develop and test more autonomous versions.

7. Early Alzheimer’s Detection via Retina
It appears as though the brain and retina undergo similar changes during the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, but the retina is easily accessible to observation whereas the brain is not - simply by examining the retina (in mice and humans) signs of Alzheimer’s can be detected before the onset of symptoms http://www.kurzweilai.net/how-to-detect-early-signs-of-alzheimers-with-a-simple-eye-exam-before-symptoms-appear. In related news we have yet another experimental Alzheimer’s vaccine showing promise http://blogs.flinders.edu.au/flinders-news/2016/07/13/progress-in-worlds-first-alzheimers-vaccine/.

8. Cell Division Differential in Damage Inheritance
An interesting study suggests that cells in both unicellular and multicellular organisms can, in certain circumstances, undergo differential or asymmetric cell division that results in most and sometimes all of the mutations and damage being inherited by only one of the two daughter cells https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2016/07/studying-bacteria-provides-insight-into-the-origins-of-aging/. In this way only one line of cells accumulates increasing damage with time - aging damage - and there is a population of cells that manages to remain youthful for arbitrary lengths of time, especially during times of stress. While a single cell cannot overcome the accumulation of damage, a group or colony of cells can do so together over time. I wonder if this might be adapted to some sort of anti-aging therapy.

9. How Bacteria Get Into Your Brainstem
In possibly the most terrifying news of the week, a type of bacteria that lives in soil has been found - via an innocuous sniff of the nose - to pass the olfactory mucosa and travel to the central nervous system via the trigeminal nerve https://app.secure.griffith.edu.au/news/2016/07/08/deadly-soil-bug-can-reach-the-brain-in-a-day/. From this route the bugs were found in the brainstem and spinal cord; they can cause the potentially fatal disease meliodosis, which can be fatal 50% of the time if it infects the brain. The finding is important as (i) other bacteria are believed to use the same mechanism, (ii) this might now be used to develop treatments and interventions for diseases and persistent pain disorders, and (iii) these are a possible bioweapon. Although I’ll speculate that engineered bacteria might instead be used as therapeutic or enhancement agents via this route.

10. Molecular Electronics Innovations
There were a few interesting molecular electronics items to cover this week. First, functional atomically thin transistors and circuits can be created out of a precise composite of graphene and molybdenum disulfide http://newscenter.lbl.gov/2016/07/11/atomically-thin-transistors/. Second, standard MIMO protocols can be used to boost communications using molecules instead of radio waves http://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/telecom/wireless/for-best-results-send-molecular-messages-through-mimo. Third, single molecule switches can now be reliably operated via mechanochemistry https://news.liverpool.ac.uk/2016/07/05/chemists-show-new-way-operate-single-molecular-switch/.

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Thanks for your additions Eric!
Always good to hear from someone with a little bit of expertise in the space e.g. the electron lithography
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Micro- and nanofabrication, operation of SEM, TEM, and AFM. Programming in LabVIEW, MATLAB, Java, PHP, MySQL, JQuery, Python, Ruby, Javascript and C++
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Denmark - Vancouver, Canada - Hamilton, Canada
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The purpose of science is to shine a light in the darkness, and lasers do it hard enough to set the darkness on fire!
Introduction
Hi there!

I'm a young geek with sporty streak.
The sporty streak is the many years of Ju-jutsu I've done. The geeky part is my degree in physics and interest in coding, movies, fantasy, sci-fi, computers, physics, roleplaying, and google!

I also love traveling by plane. I've been to some far off places like India and New Zealand and I loved it. I wonder were I will go next?
Bragging rights
Water rafted over a 7 m waterfall; taught martial arts to kids for 3+ years; 800+ h of cleanroom experience; got at Ph.D!; have great friends!
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  • Technical University of Denmark
    Applied Physics - Ph.D, 2009 - 2012
  • Technical University of Denmark
    Applied Physics - M.Sc., 2003 - 2009
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A typical Dairy Queen. Great blizzards (ice cream) and ok fast food. Clean and friendly.
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A typical McDonald's. Clean, friendly, and food comes quickly. I've never had any significant issues either ordering in the store or through the drive-through. This place accepts Android Pay.
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Great bar and restaurant. This place is usually busy and I can understand why. They have a variety of great drinks and great burgers. There are also a number of other items on the menu such as grilled cheese and assortments of sandwiches. The environment is what you would expect, some booths for those wanting a more restaurant feel, bar stools at the bar and at some tables. Large screens showing sports and such.
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FINALLY! You can purchase specific seats so you don't have to be there ahead of time to get the great seats. Like other fairchild cinema's they have an assortment of beverages and candy for purchase. There screens are generally large and the sound is excellent.
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Very nice restaurant. They have excellent calzones. You can mix and match ingredients as you wish to create your own experience, which is what I did, but you also have the option of choosing one of their suggestions. If calzones aren't your thing they have salads and starters and some dessert as well. The atmosphere is laid-back and calm with music in the background and the staff is very friendly and open. I can highly recommend this place, especially for lunch. I had a calzone with alfredo, canadian bacon, italian spiced chicken, red onion, porcini mushrooms and baby spinach. Very good!
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Very friendly people who are not afraid to joke around. They quickly and professionally estimated my damage and contacted my insurance company. When my car was returned it looked like new!
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