Profile

Cover photo
Eric Hameleers
Works at IBM
762 followers|254,271 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube+1's

Stream

Eric Hameleers

Bread Gallery  - 
 
Good oven spring and finally, nice ears to the bread. Smells delicious too! I have not cut it yet (still too warm).
This is a 70% hydration sourdough bread, hand-kneaded, with 10% plain four from the starter, 10% buckwheat, 30% whole wheat and 50% Waldkorn Eco mix. My favourite combination, I eat this almost every day..
14
愛麗絲夢遊仙境's profile photoMike Evans's profile photo
2 comments
 
+愛麗絲夢遊仙境  the lines are flour used to coat the inside of the banneton - the cane basket which can be used to keep some shape in a soft dough during its final proof.  Good work +Eric Hameleers  very pretty to my eye.
Add a comment...

Eric Hameleers

Shared publicly  - 
 
+Martin Gräßlin I see two regressions in upcoming Plasma 5.2.1 of which I am not sure where to address them (plasma-workspace or kwin).
First, the Alt-F2 key combo to start krunner stopped working. In a kosnole I see a weird character being typed if I press Alt-F2. The systemsettings5 actually detects my Alt-F2 correctly when I try to force those keys as the Global Shortcut for krunner, but it still does not make a difference.
Second: when I start a program like vncviewer through krunner, it no longer gets keyboard focus on its text entry field, and the same happens with the password dialog of vncviewer.  I have to click with my mouse into the text entry field (just examples, did not test or need more programs).
Reverting to Plasma 5.2.0 packages fixes these regressions.
Any idea where i would have to file these bugs so that they miht be fixed before public release?
8
Add a comment...

Eric Hameleers

Shared publicly  - 
 
I don't see what point? Slackware team does not contain any programmer, and Slackware Inc lacks the funding to pay for a programmer. So it will be impossible to compile the wayland backend.

Note that my KDE 5 packages already contain wayland... Because even kwin_x11 refuses to compile if Ashland is absent. Way to go, +Martin Gräßlin

He talks as if the whole logind situation is irrelevant for Slackware, but in fact I am already handicapped by his design decisions.
7
Martin Gräßlin's profile photoNiki Kovacs's profile photoDeny Dias's profile photoEric Hameleers's profile photo
14 comments
 
+Martin Gräßlin   apologies for the delay in answering, I do this open source Linux stuff only in my spare time. And it takes some time to set up a clean Plasma 5 test environment.
I can not re-create the circumstance where I experienced the build error in kwn-5.2.0 in the absense of wayland and I also did not keep the original build log. Therefore I concede that you are right, and wayland is only optional. I hope to rebuild all of the Plasma packages following the release of Frameworks 5.7.0, after removing wayland from my set of packages.
I file bug reports when I have actual proof.
Add a comment...

Eric Hameleers

Shared publicly  - 
 
6
1
Niki Kovacs's profile photoKirk Pearson (TronaTux)'s profile photo
 
Hmmm. The document states that "since the decision to adopt systemd was passed in Debian, a large percentage of their development team has quit the project". I only know of a handful of Debian developers who resigned. On the other hand, Debian counts more than 1.000 developers around the world. As far as I can tell, they're back to business as usual.
Add a comment...

Eric Hameleers
moderator

Discussion  - 
 
+Bradley D. Thornton you've worked with openvz and I need some advice.
I purchased a VPS running as a container on openvz and I want to install Slackware 14.1 on it instead of the default options (centos, fedora, debian, ubuntu) that are offered.
The techs said to me, just give us a template and we will make it available for you to install.
So OK, I started creating one. Or rather, I have written a script that creates one, so that I can share the script with the community instead of just a tarball.
My question: what are the pitfalls I have to be aware of? I see that venet0 is the network interface inside the container, do I have to mangle the rc.inet1 or rc.inet1.conf files to get it working out of the box? Do I have to disable udev or will it work with udev enabled?
Looking at http://git.openvz.org/?p=vzctl;a=blob;f=etc/dists/scripts/slackware-add_ip.sh;h=f65376b5c4db45c6a33d1a72998656c37c269e51;hb=HEAD there are some definite improvements I can offer to this file ("Slackware does not support IP aliases"? Come on guys!).

This is what I have so far: http://pastebin.com/C4Vg3V1h

Nice tidbit: my VPS has 5TB/month bandwidth on a 1gbit link, but when I told them I would be hosting Slackware repositories, they upped that to 50TB/month for free!

Thanks for input! Eric
8
Eric Hameleers's profile photoBradley D. Thornton's profile photoMarc Debacker's profile photoVinicius Mello's profile photo
26 comments
 
+Eric Hameleers, +Marc Debacker, all, I've worked on creating the slackware template for OpenVZ 2.6.32+, under the current limitation of glibc being 'too new' for kernel 2.6. I've tested on kernel 2.6.32 without any osrelease.conf modification, and it worked out of the box (as it uses the glibc from multilib and it supports kernel 2.6 well). The packing script is here: http://is.gd/rR8l8r
Add a comment...

Eric Hameleers

Wild-Yeast Fermented Breads  - 
 
First "real" bread made with my new sourdough starter (I only tried the starter in a fougasse so far, and the flavours of olive and oregano are stronger than that of a sourdough).
.
This time I changed my way of working. The hours required for making a sourdough bread do not fit in my working week, and that forced me to bake only during the weekends.
For this particular bread, I did the bulk fermentation in the fridge instead of at room temperature, and it turned out to be a success!

Ingredients:
90 gr starter (100% hydration)
255 gr cold water
100 gr  AP flour
355 gr whole wheat
25 gr olive oil
7 gr salt

I mixed the ingredients to incorporate all the moisture, and hand-kneaded it for 10 minutes (I love hand-kneading... never use a machine).
I then placed the ball of dough in an oiled bowl covered with cling film. That went into the fridge for 22 hours.
Next day, took it out of the fridge and left to acclimatize in the kitchen for 2 hours. Then I flattened the dough gently, and shaped it and put it in a flour-dusted proofing basket, and left it there (covered with cling film) for another 3 hours at room temperature.
Turned the risen dough over onto a baking tray covered with a silicone mat (ideal material!), slashed the top and baked for 40 minutes (first 20 minutes at 235 degrees C with steam in the oven, then 20 minutes at 220 degrees C without steam).

The taste of the bread is great! it has complex and subtle flavours and, only the slightest hint of sourness despite the long fermentation time. Easily the best-tasting whole wheat bread I made so far. Perhaps it's the new starter, perhaps it is the long fermentation, who knows.

Note: when I turned over the proofing basket and dumped the dough onto the baking tray, the ball flattened out, more than I was prepared for. So the slashes on top are not as deep as I usually make, because I was afraid that I would end up with a flatbread and rushed the baking tray into the oven. Luckily, the hot and steamy oven triggered a good oven spring and the resulting bread shape is perfectly acceptable.

Win: I can now bake sourdough at every day of the week if I want to :-)
21
Wilco Roos's profile photoChristina Moodie's profile photo
2 comments
 
Making it work for you....that's what it's all about!
Add a comment...

Eric Hameleers

Bread Gallery  - 
 
This is what's left of this evening's sourdough fougasse... it took only a few minutes and a couple of family members to grab the other half and swallow it whole.

I had begun a new sourdough starter (100% hydration) two weeks ago because I was not terribly happy with the smell of my 3 months'old first starter (70% hydration). It is no longer smelling vinegary but quite buttery. The breads it creates are good though - a pleasant slightly sweet taste, but not trace of sourness at all which is a pity.

The new starter smells fruity-sour and the fougasse was basically a first trial to see how it wold work in a bread. Well, the dough rose like mad, much quicker than the other ball of dough created at the same time but with the older starter. The taste of the bread is very delicate with a hint of sourness.
I am quite happy with this new starter.
10
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
762 people
rani singh's profile photo
Frode Monsson's profile photo
Malleshwar Chelluri Durga's profile photo
avi jack's profile photo
Fred Richards's profile photo
Sebastian Wiedenroth's profile photo
kor la kung's profile photo
Osmar Sousa's profile photo
chotib bagus's profile photo

Communities

12 communities

Eric Hameleers

Wild-Yeast Fermented Breads  - 
 
An interesting documentary from the dutch public television program "Keuringsdienst van Waarde" (dutch spoken but with english subtitles):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2VP_iQLIzm0 .

The documentary discusses the lack of regulation in the Netherlands with regard to the name "sourdough bread". As a consequence, 90+% of all commercial sourdough bread sold in the Netherlands is actually not sourdough at all, but contains a small quantity (1%) of sourdough powder, used as a flavoring ingredient instead of a leavening ingredient.
And the public are willing to pay a higher price for fake sourdough bread because they are unaware.
Some embarrassing lack of fundamental baking knowledge is being displayed by some "bakers" in the documentary.
5
Add a comment...

Eric Hameleers

Wild-Yeast Fermented Breads  - 
 
I have baking with my two white flour based sourdough cultures for nine months, and I thought it was time to create a rye sourdough starter out of a white flour starter, to see how different the breads would be using this new starter.
My first attempt (a buckwheat and dried cherry sourdough bread) failed miserably because the dough collapsed just when I wanted to bake it (way overproofed? Too much buckwheat?). I still baked the sticky mess in a dutch oven to keep it together somewhat... and the result was a very nicely tasting clump of very dense bread.

The second attempt went a lot better.
Using Martin Johansson's recipe for Rye and Honey sourdough, I ended up with the big loaf in the pictures. I never had a sourdough grow so much in volume during its bulk fermentation and proofing stages, it was amazing! This time, the dough kept its strength and structure and gave a perfect result. The added honey creates a beautiful dark and tasty crust, and the crumb is soft, with a delicious blend of the rye and acacia honey.
I never cared much for the rye bread we can buy in the shops here in the Netherlands, but I had been adding 10% rye to my whole-wheat sourdough breads lately and that really improved the flavor of my breads. I am glad I finally tried increasing the rye percentage.

Here's the recipe I followed (slightly adapted from the book):

The night before you bake, create a levain - mix the following and leave to develop overnight (covered):
- 50 gr rye sourdough (100% hydration)
- 150 gr water
- 65 gr rye flour (I used stone-milled whole-grain flour)
- 35 gr whole wheat flour

The next day (in my case, appr. 10 hours later), mix the following together and leave to autolyse for 30 minutes:
- yesterday's levain
- 30 gr honey
- 165 gr water
- 325 gr strong white flour (I used  200 gr wholewheat and 100 gr plain flour instead)
- 75 gr rye flour

After the 30 minutes autolyse, mix into the dough:
- 8 gr salt

Knead the dough by hand for 10 minutes, then leave it in a covered bowl for its bulk fermentation stage. The recipe estimates 3 to 5 hours but after 3 hours my dough had expanded to more than double the original volume so at that point I continued with the recipe.

Gently press the air out of the dough and fold it into a ball: stretch a bit of the dough to the side and fold it back to the center. Repeat this while rotating the mass of dough. This brings some tension into the skin of the dough ball you are forming.

Dust a round proofing basket with flour (or use any kind of bowl lined with a tea towel and sprinkle the towel generously with flour), and place the dough in the basket with the seam down (the seam-side will be facing upward in the oven, thus creating opportunity for the bread to crack open while baking). Cover the basket (or place it inside a big plastic shopping bag) to prevent draught from messing with it and leave it alone in your kitchen for a further 1.5 hours of proofing. 

In the meantime, place an oven stone or pizza stone roughly in the middle of your oven, a metal tray on the oven floor and pre-heat it to 240 C,

When the dough has proofed sufficiently (and roughly doubled in volume again), turn over the basket onto a silicone mat or baking parchment, and shove that onto the baking stone in the oven.
Pour a cup of cold water into the metal tray on the oven floor - that will produce steam and develop a great crust.

Bake for 20 minutes on 240 C with the steam, then lower the temp to 210 C, open the oven door slightly to let the steam escape, close the door and bake for a further 20 minutes.

The smell! The flavor! One of my best.
22
Levain Rising's profile photoPhilippe Le Toquin's profile photo
2 comments
 
I must try this recipe. Thanks a lot 
Add a comment...

Eric Hameleers

Bread Gallery  - 
 
My first attempt at baking ciabatta was met with lots of approval from my family.
Today I am going to re-create this bread with a preferment that has been in the making for 12 hours (instead of the 6 hours that was used for the ciabatta in the picture) - curious to see how that affects the taste.
16
Dan Warren's profile photoEric Hameleers's profile photo
2 comments
 
Second batch went well. I used a preferment of 75% hydration and 0.0025% instant yeast ( 0.5 gr yeast to 200 gr flour) and let it rest at room temp for well over 13 hours. End product came at 83% hydration and I baked at 240C instead of the previous 220C. It ctreated a crispier and somewhat darker crust.
Add a comment...

Eric Hameleers

Wild-Yeast Fermented Breads  - 
 
I am in San Diego for work and in the local Ralph's supermarket I laid eyes on this San Francisco sourdough bread. I had to buy it just to get a taste of what this sourdough strain is all about. I've never found a sourdough bread anywhere in the dutch supermarkets.

And - it smells and tastes amazing! A unique smell and taste, and a sourness that's refreshing, not tangy. Yes I know... even though this is a commercial bread wrapped in plastic.

It's really a pity that the customs guys at the airport will prevent me from taking any of this back to Europe, but I think it will be worth while ordering some of the starter through the Internet.
9
Florian Niemann's profile photoSheri Kauffman's profile photoWilco Roos's profile photoPhilippe Le Toquin's profile photo
12 comments
 
May and dairy are normally a big no..

But it depends... In Canada for example cheese can be imported as long as it is vacuum packed. I think it would be the same for cook meat 
Add a comment...
 
When I started baking breads, it was mostly because I wanted to know if I could make three particular things: a foccaccia (to revice a memory from an amorous holiday trip), a "limburgse kersenvlaai" (a cherry pie) and a "limburgse rijstevlaai" (a pie with rice & egg filling). I made the foccaccia long ago (and like it a lot), and today I created the final one on my list: the "rijstevlaai". Both pies are made with enriched bread dough. The cherry pie was a way to preserve the produce of the land (grain, fruits, eggs, milk)  in the region where I was born. Rice pies were an influence of the Spanjards invading the southern part of my country (Limburg is the southernmost province) in the 80-year war with the Netherlands.

The rice pie is relatively complex to make because it needs the right mix of ingredients to produce a good pie where the cooked rice is exactly moist and sweet enough.
I must say, the result is great! It's just a shame that nobody in the family likes it... it's a typical Limburgian treat and the "Hollanders" have a hard time appreciating the taste. I think I will bring half of the pie to my mum.
If anyone is interested in the recipe, I will post it. I took it from an old recipe book. And even though I reached the end of my "bucket list", I was enthused by baking breads so much, that I will not stop now.
16
Lee Rowlands's profile photoDoug Essinger-Hileman's profile photoEric Hameleers's profile photoNadira Gilbert's profile photo
5 comments
 
Thank you for your recipe, +Eric Hameleers! I cant wait to try this! :-) 
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
762 people
rani singh's profile photo
Frode Monsson's profile photo
Malleshwar Chelluri Durga's profile photo
avi jack's profile photo
Fred Richards's profile photo
Sebastian Wiedenroth's profile photo
kor la kung's profile photo
Osmar Sousa's profile photo
chotib bagus's profile photo
Communities
12 communities
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
Slackware coreteam member
Introduction
I love classical science fiction - with hard science. I also love (listening to) music and have a varied taste ranging from ethnic to mediaeval to industrial to (you name it).
I work on Slackware Linux development and hang out in the ##slackware channel in Freenode IRC network.
Work
Occupation
In my current assignment I manage a global helpdesk; I am also a 3rd line UNIX support person.
Skills
LDAP, High Availability
Employment
  • IBM
    IT Specialist, Linux & Open Source, 1998 - present
Links
Contributor to
Eric Hameleers's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Alien Pastures
alien.slackbook.org

My thoughts on Slackware, life and everything

Save 50% In Celebration of Day Against DRM - O'Reilly Media
shop.oreilly.com

In Celebration of Day Against DRM - Save 50% on ALL O'Reilly Ebooks & Videos

My Tracks
market.android.com

My Tracks allows you to record and share your GPS tracks, including statistics. Use My Tracks while you run, bike, hike, or do anything else