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Emmanuele Bassi
1,832 followers -
geek. husband. software engineer. lover. not necessarily in that order.
geek. husband. software engineer. lover. not necessarily in that order.

1,832 followers
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Wrote a new blog post about Emeus, with the latest development:

* extended Visual Format Language syntax support
* a visual constraint editor utility

This time, you even get videos. :-)

If you're using GTK+, you want to try Emeus out to manage layouts using constraints instead of boxes or fixed positioning.

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Wrote a new blog post about Emeus, with the latest development:

* extended Visual Format Language syntax support
* a visual constraint editor utility

This time, you even get videos. :-)

If you're using GTK+, you want to try Emeus out to manage layouts using constraints instead of boxes or fixed positioning.

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Same here: converted my own "vanity domain" to Let's Encrypt this year, and it was super easy to set up and automate the renewal of the certificate. Compared to what I had to do with a typical certificate authority, this was downright pleasant.

I was happy to donate to the project, as well.

If you're planning to get a certificate from Let's Encrypt, remember to donate some money to keep the whole thing running!
Obviously not a lot great to say about 2016, but having converted my personal services and freedesktop.org this year, and +Collabora mostly having converted as well, I'm really grateful for Let's Encrypt. Super easy to set up, incredibly well done.

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could not go to bed without at least reading the first few chapters...
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Boxes? Where we're going, we don't need… boxes.

I wrote an article on the constraint-based layout manager I'm experimenting on at Endless.

For the adventurous among you: https://github.com/ebassi/emeus/


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I spent some time yesterday collecting data from the GLib and GTK+ repositories — courtesy of +Jonathan Corbet's git-dm utility.

Instead of posting the results on my blog, I decided to use the fancy new +GTK development blog.

As I said in the article, I attribute the slight slowdown in contributions to GTK+ to the fact that 3.22 was a stabilisation cycle after the big CSS rework of GTK+ 3.20. Additionally, 3.22 is now the "long term support" release for 3.x, and work has already started on topic branches for the development cycle that will lead to 4.0.
It's stable release time!

Now that GLib 2.50 and GTK+ 3.22 have been released, let's look back at the development cycle and get some numbers on who contributed to the core of the GNOME platform.

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This is pretty important.

The whole GTK team has been discussing this plan for a while, and we think we found a good compromise for the set of people using GTK+:

* the GNOME project
* the application developers using GTK+
* the GTK+ developers

We want more features, and a better, more modern toolkit; but we also want to give a chance to people using GTK+ to target long term releases for their applications without necessarily having to deal with changes introduced during development cycles.

We are confident that everyone will be adequately served by this new release management policy.
As promised after the hackfest in Toronto earlier this year, the GTK+ team and various stakeholders in the toolkit development have worked on a new policy for development and stable branches of GTK+ going forward.

You can read more about the new release scheme on the GTK+ development blog.
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