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Elisabeth Schabus
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Elisabeth Schabus

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Aaaaand this is a perfect post for Loki's Day (lördag) ... let there be fire and brimstone (or other rocks and stuff) ...
Jättethanks to the evil scheming of +Finland Explorer​ and the relentless sharing of +Steven Spence
Finland Explorer originally shared:
 
Practical Finnish Lessons

Exactly. :D

[Kuusi Palaa] - Imgur

Via +Pasi Ääpälä and +Mikko Karvonen

Found at http://bit.ly/18pCunB

#Finnish #Language #Finlandinyourstream
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Take care, John Miller is a dating Scammer!!!!!! Look on Image search, please!!!!!!! 
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Elisabeth Schabus

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Courtesy +One-Word-A-Day​ :-)
..."Around 1900, William Archibald Spooner (1844-1930), a friendly but nervous education expert working at Oxford’s New College, gave his name to this effect. He became famous for the very entertaining mistakes he made while speaking.

“Is the bean dizzy?” Spooner asked, meaning “Is the dean busy?” “You have tasted two worms and hissed all my mystery lectures”, he angrily told a student who had wasted two terms and missed his history lectures. He also said, “It is kisstomary to cuss the bride” (It is customary to kiss the bride) and “Let us raise our lasses to the queer old dean”, meaning “dear old queen”. A room where students and teachers gather in their free time at New College, Oxford, is now known unofficially as The Rooner Spoom in Spooner’s honour. 

Psychological stress or lack of concentration can cause anyone to speak spike Looner. 

A French Canadian announcer once said, “This is the Dominion Network of the Canadian Broadcorping Castration”, and an announcer on BBC Radio introduced a top politician, Sir Stafford Cripps, as “Sir Stifford Craps”. US President Herbert Hoover was once announced as “Hoobert Heaver”, and musician Eddie Peabody was introduced with the words: “Mr Eddie Playbody will now pee for you”.
 
Spoonerisms are fairly easy to create. First, take the two sounds from the beginning of two different words or parts of words, such as “funny bone”. Then, switch the two sounds to the other word or word part: “bunny fone”. When writing them, make sure to spell the resulting words correctly – in this case, “bunny phone”. Not all spoonerisms make sense; some just sound strange or funny. Try to reverse engineer these back to well-known English phrases: “a lack of pies”, “It’s roaring with pain”, “shake a tower”.

At www.spoonerize.com you can type in names or other word pairs and make your own personal spoonerisms. 

Spoonerisms appear in many languages. Search Google for Schüttelreime (or Rüttelscheime, as I prefer to call them) and for more of examples. And there’s a cartoon by Uli Stein in which a student is viewing a map of Europe and says to his geography teacher: Wenn Kopenholm nicht die Hauptstadt von Daneland ist, wird’s wohl Stockhagen sein... oder verwechsle ich das jetzt mit Finnmark?

If you have any personal examples (German or English), please mend me a sail at paul@smith.de, and maybe I’ll use yours in a future article. Here's one of my favourites: A secretary became fed up with her colleagues leaving Post-it messages all over her desk. Storming into her boss's office, she said, “I’ve had enough of these stucking ficky notes all over the place”. 

Cake tear! 

Smaul Pith"
 
Rinks and Lechts Verlwechsern!

Do the following names look strangely familiar? Fink Ployd, Hitney Whouston, Peep Durple, Coe Jocker. These are all examples of spoonerisms – mistakes made in speech in which parts of words or phrases get mixed up.

Read the whole story on the Weekend Read Website.

You'll find the weekly "Mini-Story Challenge" on our website as well. Take part and enjoy your weekend!

Paul Smith
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No idea!
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Elisabeth Schabus

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hmm ... I wonder if my blog would be more of a success like this ... 
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You're welcome +Elisabeth Schabus !
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Elisabeth Schabus

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It's either surf or turf for me ... wouldn't want it combined ... what about you guys?
 
The word for 20th April 2015 is
* * * surf n turf * * *

a) alternately swimming and sunbathing
b) a meal that combines meat and seafood
c) a vehicle that can be operated on land and water

Happy guessing!
Paul Smith
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As if you had written the +One-Word-A-Day​ post yourself, +Armida Evonyapplauds :-)
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Elisabeth Schabus

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I'd like to have Swedish and Icelandic films at +Zurich Film Festival​ ... but also Italian and French ones .... Which are your preferences, dear Plusketeers?
 
The film lists are ready - now it's time to fill them with the ‪#‎ZFF2015‬ titles. Which films would you like to see in this year's ZFF programme?
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French ones :))
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Elisabeth Schabus

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The ultimate #Caturday lore, brought to my attention by having been plussed by a certain +Lars Fosdal​ :-)
 
The Return Of The Ninja Cat!!  Level ~ Advance




Cat communication is the transfer of information by one or more cats that has an effect on the current or future behaviour of another animal, including humans. Cats use a range of communication modalities including visual, auditory, tactile, chemical and gustatory.

The communication modalities used by domestic cats have been affected by domestication.


Vocalizations

Cat vocalisations have been categorised according to a range of characteristics.

Schötz categorised vocalizations according to 3 mouth actions: (1) sounds produced with the mouth closed (murmurs), including the purr, the trill and the chirrup, (2) sounds produced with the mouth open and gradually closing, comprising a large variety of miaows with similar vowel patterns, and (3) sounds produced with the mouth held tensely open in the same position, often uttered in aggressive situations (growls, yowls, snarls, hisses, spits and shrieks).

Brown et al. categorised vocal responses of cats according to the behavioural context: (1) during separation of kittens from mother cats, (2) during food deprivation, (3) during pain, (4) prior to or during threat or attack behavior, as in disputes over territory or food, (5) during a painful or acutely stressful experience, as in routine prophylactic injections and (6) during kitten deprivation. Less commonly recorded calls from mature cats included purring, conspecific greeting calls or murmurs, extended vocal dialogues between cats in separate cages, “frustration” calls during training or extinction of conditioned responses.

Miller classified vocalisations into 5 categories according to the sound produced: the purr, chirr, call, meow and growl/snarl/hiss.


Purr

The purr is a continuous, soft, vibrating sound made in the throat by most species of felines. Domestic cat kittens can purr as early as two days of age. This tonal rumbling can characterize different personalities in domestic cats. Purring is often believed to indicate a positive emotional state, but cats sometimes purr when they are ill, tense, or experiencing traumatic or painful moments.

The mechanism of how cats purr is elusive. This is partly because cats do not have a unique anatomical feature that is clearly responsible for the vocalization. One hypothesis, supported by electromyographic studies, is that cats produce the purring noise by using the vocal folds and/or the muscles of the larynx to alternately dilate and constrict the glottis rapidly, causing air vibrations during inhalation and exhalation. Combined with the steady inhalation and exhalation as the cat breathes, a purring noise is produced with strong harmonics. Purring is sometimes accompanied by other sounds, though this varies between individuals. Some may only purr, while other cats include low level outbursts sometimes described as "lurps" or "yowps".

Domestic cats purr at varying frequencies. One study reported that domestic cats purr at average frequencies of 21.98 Hz in the egressive phase and 23.24 Hz in the ingressive phase with an overall mean of 22.6 Hz. Further research on purring in four domestic cats found that the fundamental frequency varied between 20.94 and 27.21 Hz for the egressive phase and between 23.0 and 26.09 Hz for the ingressive phase. There was considerable variation between the four cats in the relative amplitude, duration and frequency between egressive and ingressive phases, although this variation generally occurred within the normal range.

One study on a single cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) showed it purred with an average frequency of 20.87 Hz (egressive phases) and 18.32 Hz (ingressive phases). A further study on four adult cheetahs found that mean frequencies were between 19.3 Hz and 20.5 Hz in ingressive phases, and between 21.9 Hz and 23.4 Hz in egressive phases. The egressive phases were longer than ingressive phases and moreover, the amplitude was greater in the egressive phases.

It was once believed that only the cats of the genus Felis could purr. However, felids of the genus Panthera (tigers, lions, jaguars and leopards) also produce sounds similar to purring, but only when exhaling. The subdivision of the Felidae into ‘purring cats’ on the one hand and ‘roaring cats ’ (i.e. non-purring) on the other, originally goes back to Owen (1834/1835) and was definitely introduced by Pocock (1916), based on a difference in hyoid anatomy. The ‘roaring cats’ (lion, Panthera leo; tiger, P. tigris; jaguar, P. onca; leopard, P. pardus) have an incompletely ossified hyoid, which according to this theory, enables them to roar but not to purr. On the other hand, the snow leopard (Uncia uncia), as the fifth felid species with an incompletely ossified hyoid, purrs (Hemmer, 1972). All remaining species of the family Felidae (‘purring cats’) have a completely ossified hyoid which enables them to purr but not to roar. However, Weissengruber et al. (2002) argued that the ability of a cat species to purr is not affected by the anatomy of its hyoid, i.e. whether it is fully ossified or has a ligamentous epihyoid, and that, based on a technical acoustic definition of roaring, the presence of this vocalization type depends on specific characteristics of the vocal folds and an elongated vocal tract, the latter rendered possible by an incompletely ossified hyoid.





Meow

The meow is one of the most widely known vocalizations of domestic kittens. It is a call apparently used to solicit attention from the mother.

Adult cats commonly vocalise with a "meow" (or "miaow") sound, which is onomatopoeic. The meow can be assertive, plaintive, friendly, bold, welcoming, attention soliciting, demanding, or complaining. It can even be silent, where the cat opens its mouth but does not vocalize. Adult cats do not usually meow to each other and so meowing to human beings is likely to be an extension of the use by kittens.








Language differences

Different languages have correspondingly different words for the "meow" sound, including miau (Belarusian, Croatian, Hungarian, Dutch, Finnish, Lithuanian, Malay, German, Polish, Russian, Portuguese, Romanian, Spanish and Ukrainian), mnau (Czech), meong (Indonesian), niau (Ukrainian), niaou (?????, Greek), miaou (French), nya (??, Japanese), miao (?, Mandarin Chinese, Italian), miav/miao or mjav/mjau (Danish, Swedish and Norwegian), mjá (Icelandic), ya-ong (??, Korean), ????? / Miya?un_ (Urdu) and meo-meo (Vietnamese). In some languages (such as Chinese ?, mao), the vocalization became the name of the animal itself.

Read more : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat_communication

#gif #cats #animals #caturday #caturdayeveryday #caturday2014 #catsrule #catsallovertheworld #catholic #catlovers #animallovers #animalphotography #catphotography #catphotos #catpictures #catpics #lol #funny #funnypics #funnypictures #funnyphotos #funnystuff #ANNIMATEDGIFS   #trendingnow   #lolcats
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Cats are aliens ... landed in Egypt about 6000 years ago and have henceforth been worshipped as gods 
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Elisabeth Schabus

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What a beauty!
Thx, +Finland Explorer​ , you fill the gaps until those Topgear guys are back in a job ...
 
Finnish electric supercar turns heads in Monaco

"The Toroidion battery-powered car boasts a 1,341 horsepower engine, but at the moment is only a concept car and apparently still needs to undergo road testing.

The name of the vehicle, 1MW, stands for one megawatt, and its power is purported to rival the Swedish Koenigsegg One supercar. Unlike the Koenigsegg, though, the 1MW is powered only by electricity.

While details about specifications of the engine and battery technologies remain scant, the automotive press world took notice of the car at its unveiling in Monaco on Thursday..."

Read on: http://bit.ly/1FRwZIv

#Finland #Toroidion #ElectricCar #Cars
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Hehhhheee...  :D
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Have them in circles
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Elisabeth Schabus

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Aaaaand this is a perfect post for Loki's Day (lördag) ... let there be fire and brimstone (or other rocks and stuff) ...
Jättethanks to the evil scheming of +Finland Explorer​ and the relentless sharing of +Steven Spence
Finland Explorer originally shared:
 
Practical Finnish Lessons

Exactly. :D

[Kuusi Palaa] - Imgur

Via +Pasi Ääpälä and +Mikko Karvonen

Found at http://bit.ly/18pCunB

#Finnish #Language #Finlandinyourstream
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Interesting!
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Elisabeth Schabus

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This is a book I really, really loved ... and don't be fooled by the stupid claim on the cover: it has nothing to do with the Julia Roberts film
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"Eat, Pray, Love" was written by the same author (it says so on the cover), which fact almost made me ignore this book.
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Elisabeth Schabus

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I love this thing ... something in it is broken, it used to work perfectly fine, and we'd even have some new records for it ... hopefully hubby can find the time to fix it some day ...
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lol nur 50 aber bei 25 bin ich stehen geblieben ;)
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Elisabeth Schabus

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You'll need to make your selfies and read your texts with arms raised like this ... frequently altering your elbow position (this might make you look like a desperate chicken, but it's great for the deltoids) ... or else: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2839455/Why-hunching-phone-gives-pain-Image-shows-tilting-head-puts-four-STONE-extra-pressure-neck.html
Brought to my attention by hmm ... let me check .... +Christian Grenfeldt​ ! Tack!
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I'm doing this Android-workout again. It really hurts (no pain, no gain) ... and it makes you quit earlier and do useful stuff ;))
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#marketingfail 3M must have had serious problems remembering the little things ... smh
 
Sorry, what's your name again?

A recent ad for 3M’s Post-It notes shows a couple asleep in bed. The woman has a Post-It on her forehead, on which is written “JANE”. The slogan reads “For the little things you’ll forget”. 3M’s ad agency got this wrong on two counts. Besides the fact that many women (comprising 65% of the Post-It customer base) find this ad unfunny, a person’s name is hardly a little thing.

Read the whole story on the Weekend Read Website.

You'll find the weekly "Mini-Story Challenge" on our website as well. Take part and enjoy your weekend!

Paul Smith
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  • A warrior will find a battlefield
    2014 - 2015