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Jao Ying Story

Jao Ying is an Asian elephant that comes from the Province of Tak, east of Thailand. She has had a difficult life, with her owner mistreating her to make her a domestic animal. Once trained to that she can be controlled, usually beaten with a bull hook, she was placed in the logging trade, moving and carry heavy teak trees to the river, every day for 5 years. When the Thai government banned the use of elephants in the logging trade, Joa Ying did not have time to rest. She was then placed in a circus to perform tricks for tourists on a daily basis. To learn these tricks, she was once again beaten as a form of training, slowly draining the spirit of the elephant. She would be made to work every day with little food and rest and she did this for 10 Years of her life.

Read Detail: http://www.elephantretirementpark.com/?page=post&id=6

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Telephone Number: 053-270-732
Mobile: 081-671-9110, 091-482-6534
Website: http://www.elephantretirementpark.com

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Noi's Story

Noi came from North Eastern Thailand. His elder brother brought him to Bangkok to study elephant behavior for years at the Wat PrasatBoonyavat Temple. Where he learn Buddist Story, doctrine, From there, Noi moved to Chiang Mai where he became a tour guide. This is where Noi saw first hand the treatment of elephants, and it broke his heart. He saw elephants being mistreated on a daily basis. This caused his soul to become disturbed. How can such an amazing creature be beaten, over worked, and mistreated. Noi eventually ended up working at an elephant camp where he met an orphaned elephant. He instantly fell in love with her, so much, that he could not leave her side because she would cry at night for him to return. Noi ended up sleeping with her so she wouldn't cry. From this moment, Noi realized that he wanted dedicate his life to saving elephants from these horrific conditions. In 2014, Noi decided that the best way to save these elephants was to build a camp where they can live in peace in a natural safe habitat. He decided that tourist would like to learn about the elephants in a humane way by building & promoting elephant ecotourism.

Read Detail: http://www.elephantretirementpark.com/?page=post&id=5

Reservations:
Telephone Number: 053-270-732
Mobile: 081-671-9110, 091-482-6534
Website: http://www.elephantretirementpark.com

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The Thai Elephant Today

In the year 1900 Thailand might have had as many as 100,000 domesticated elephants, and perhaps as many as one man in fifty might have worked at least part time as a mahout, a rider or elephants. An elephant walking through a village would have excited no more attention than a ten-wheeled truck does today. The number of domesticated elephants (sometimes misleadingly called tame or work elephants) is presently in a steady, inexorable decline. In 1994, according to statistics of the Local Administration Department of the Ministry of Interior, Thailand had about 3,565 domesticated elephants, considerably down from the 5,232 listed by the same agency in 1980. The province with the most elephants is Tak, which had 740 listed in 1994. This is a fact which inevitably surprises Thais, who automatically assume that it must be Surin, home of the world famous Elephant Roundup. (In fact, Surin only has 160 elephants.) The north has about 2,600 elephants, or two-thirds of the national total. Although many northern elephants might be recent immigrants, particularly from the northeast but also from the south, which has suffered a precipitous decline to fewer than half of the animals it had in 1980.

Read Detail: http://www.elephantretirementpark.com/?page=post&id=4

Reservations:
Telephone Number: 053-270-732
Mobile: 081-671-9110, 091-482-6534
Website: http://www.elephantretirementpark.com

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The White Elephant

To outsiders, the description might seem whimsical. To others, however, among them the Thai King to whom the report was addressed, it amounted to praise of the very highest order. For no other animal has ever been accorded such enormous respect as the white elephant. It is perhaps as well to state right away that the name is highly misleading, at least to western readers. There has never been such a thing as a white elephant and no Siamese ever speaks of such a creature. The animals which are venerated by old-fashioned Siamese, and some of which are kept in the royal palace as appurtenances of royalty, are in fact albinos, and are called by the Siamese Chang Pheuak, which simply means Albino Elephants. Albino buffaloes are very common, and they are also called pheuak. The same word is used for human albinos.

Read Detail: http://www.elephantretirementpark.com/?page=post&id=3

Reservations:
Telephone Number: 053-270-732
Mobile: 081-671-9110, 091-482-6534
Website: http://www.elephantretirementpark.com

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The Thai Elephant in History

The first recorded elephant in Thai history occurs in a stone inscription traditionally thought to have been composed in 1292 by order of King Ramkamhaeng the Great of Sukhothai. Elephants of various kinds – tame and wild, sacred and mundane – figure all through this famous evocation of life in an idyllic kingdom. Precisely when the Asian elephant was is debatable, but it was certainly before the earliest documented Indian civilization, about 4000 years ago. Some scholars believe the process could have developed elsewhere as well, perhaps simultaneously, perhaps even earlier, in other areas where wild elephants were abundant, such as Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam. In any event it is from the Indus Valley, in an area now part of Pakistan, that clear evidence of Domestication first appears in the form of seals and various other objects.

Read Detail: http://www.elephantretirementpark.com/?page=post&id=2

Reservations:
Telephone Number: 053-270-732
Mobile: 081-671-9110, 091-482-6534
Website: http://www.elephantretirementpark.com

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The Asian Elephant

From this creature more than 300 related species evolved, some of them dwarfs and others enormous. By the time man appeared on earth, all but three had disappeared. One of these, the vast Woolly Mammoth, whose portrait appears in many prehistoric cave paintings, is believed to have made its exit from the scene about 10,000 years ago, possibly due to a period of climatic warning. This left only two, the Asian elephant (Elephas Maximus) and the African elephant (Laxodonta Africanna), both of which currently face an uphill struggle in a world increasingly hostile to their survival. Asian or African, elephants have certain similar characteristics, most of them unusual. They are large of course – an adult Asian bull can weigh three to four tons and stand ten feet tall at his highest point – yet do seem cumbersome as they make their way on remarkable feet pads that expand and contract and allow them to negotiate jungle and fields, steep hills and marshland. They are strong, capable of pulling heavy teak logs or carrying loads of about 600 pounds. They have the longest gestation period of any mammal, about twenty-two month, and are longest living except for man. They have very thick skin, though this does not provide quite such protection as many believe. They suffer great discomfort from all sorts of parasite who take up residence in the deep folds and wrinkles covering much of the body, which is why elephants enjoy frequent baths and coat them selves with layers of dust or mud whenever an opportunity presents itself.

Read Detail: http://www.elephantretirementpark.com/?page=post&id=1

Reservations:
Telephone Number: 053-270-732
Mobile: 081-671-9110, 091-482-6534
Website: http://www.elephantretirementpark.com

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Elephant Retire Park - Photo Album 14 November 2016

The Elephant Retirement Park has been established to create a haven for retired elephants. Formally working in building yards, it is now illegal to use elephants for labor. This has drastically altered their function in Thai society.

A sanctuary for retired elephants, free to roam and graze on the surrounding vegetation. Walk, bathe and feed them. Strict no abuse policy. All welcome.

Open Daily - CONTACT US
Office: 5 Kotchasarn Road Soi 5, T. Changklan A. Muang, Chiang Mai Thailand 50100
Telephone: +6653270732
Mobile: +66816719110, +66819619663
e-Mail: chiangmai10@gmail.com
Website: http://www.elephantretirementpark.com
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
16-11-14
96 Photos - View album

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Elephant Retire Park - Photo Album 13 November 2016

The Elephant Retirement Park has been established to create a haven for retired elephants. Formally working in building yards, it is now illegal to use elephants for labor. This has drastically altered their function in Thai society.

A sanctuary for retired elephants, free to roam and graze on the surrounding vegetation. Walk, bathe and feed them. Strict no abuse policy. All welcome.

Open Daily - CONTACT US
Office: 5 Kotchasarn Road Soi 5, T. Changklan A. Muang, Chiang Mai Thailand 50100
Telephone: +6653270732
Mobile: +66816719110, +66819619663
e-Mail: chiangmai10@gmail.com
Website: http://www.elephantretirementpark.com
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
16-11-13
99 Photos - View album

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Elephant Retire Park - Photo Album 12 November 2016

The Elephant Retirement Park has been established to create a haven for retired elephants. Formally working in building yards, it is now illegal to use elephants for labor. This has drastically altered their function in Thai society.

A sanctuary for retired elephants, free to roam and graze on the surrounding vegetation. Walk, bathe and feed them. Strict no abuse policy. All welcome.

Open Daily - CONTACT US
Office: 5 Kotchasarn Road Soi 5, T. Changklan A. Muang, Chiang Mai Thailand 50100
Telephone: +6653270732
Mobile: +66816719110, +66819619663
e-Mail: chiangmai10@gmail.com
Website: http://www.elephantretirementpark.com
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
16-11-12
122 Photos - View album
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