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EKTIMIS - An Attitude of Respect
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Home of The Top Tens Laws of Respect
Home of The Top Tens Laws of Respect

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Reshape your thinking...with principles that govern respect in the workplace.
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PRINCIPLES OF CHECKS & BALANCES

Try to identify other checks and balances - like these below.
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"A child will respect a position of authority only as much as he recognizes the value of the position." - N. Taiwo, March 2012
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BUILDING “BRIDGES” TO SOLVE LIFE’S PROBLEMS

We often hear the expression, “We need to start building bridges to fix our problems” – particularly in the aftermath of a crisis that reaches a boiling point. Crisis occurs within organizations and within communities all the time. In fact, we are in the middle of a major crisis right now – with the tragic conflict between America’s law enforcement and the African American community where mutual respect has virtually eroded.
 
When I heard this “bridge building” expression again recently, I began to wonder why previous “Bridges” between warring parties have failed, and this led me to do some research that led to this article.
 
Science and engineering (from whence the “bridge building” expression comes from) actually provides a good framework for solving common life problems. Refer to my diagram showing the famous Golden Gate Bridge (completed in 1937) which spans about 1.7 miles and connects San Francisco to Marin Counties in California. The bridge has stood 79 years and weathered many storms and earthquakes.
 
My focus with this diagram is with the foundation - circled in red. Four (4) foundational structures support the entire bridge – two anchorages (Anchorage 1 & 2) and two piers (Piers 1 & 2). The two anchorages (which are well grounded) hold down cables 1 & 3, which along with cables 2, keep the two towers horizontally stable, thus keeping the bridge from collapsing.
 
Also, the two piers (which are also deeply grounded) provide the support for each of the two towers that sit atop them, keeping the towers vertically stable, thus keeping the bridge from collapsing. With this foundational support the Deck (on which vehicles travel) is able to connect two communities in a beneficial way. This is the reason why these anchorages and piers are heavily guarded and protected. The teams that constructed these anchorages and piers were competent, knowledgeable, and accountable. They were people of integrity and thus were trusted.
 
In the aftermath of a crisis where bridges need to be built, or rebuilt, it is of paramount importance that the necessary foundational support be established – otherwise, the resulting bridges will not stand adverse elements or the test of time.
 
Science and engineering offer us so much valuable lessons that are applicable to life’s simple and complex challenges. I believe this analogy serves as a framework and offers many lessons too. Perhaps we can use this model to rebuild new bridges that foster mutual respect and trust between our law enforcement and the African American communities.
 
--- N. Taiwo (EKTIMIS)
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Who Would You Like to Be Today?
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WORDS & IMAGE OF WISDOM

Here is an image (from our artifact gallery), along with some words of wisdom - particularly this long (July 4th) holiday weekend. Be safe.
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WORKING SMART & WORKING HARD
 
“Work smart always; work hard when necessary.”
 
The days of working hard all the time are over. The days of working smart all the time are here. However, you still need to work hard when necessary. Here are four illustrations:
 
Work hard – to meet a critical deadline. Work smart – to prevent a deadline from becoming critical.
 
Work hard – to achieve an objective in the final hours. Work smart – to achieve an objective before the final hours.
 
Work hard – by preparing to launch an important initiative. Work smart – by planning an important initiative in advance of preparation to launch.
 
Work hard – by putting in many hours to get the job done. Work smart – by putting in the hours necessary to produce a quality outcome.
 
--- N. Taiwo (EKTIMIS)
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WHY YOU SHOULD ALMOST NEVER QUIT A JOB ON THE SPOT
 
On June 21, 2016 the Wall Street Journal’s (WSJ) Sue Shellenbarger published an engaging article posing the question – “Is it Ever OK to Quit on the Spot?” The reference in the article clearly was to a job. The article was one in a series of other great articles dealing with work life. (Link to the original article: http://www.wsj.com/articles/is-it-ever-ok-to-quit-on-the-spot-1466531589)
 
The question caught my attention and I decided to evaluate it – but from a different perspective, as we often do here at EKTIMIS. I am posting three compelling reasons, in response, why you should almost never quit any job on the spot.
 
I say “almost never” because there are always exceptions to most circumstances in life. In this case, two exceptions would be: (i) you quit immediately if/when you find out that your employer is engaged in criminal activity; (ii) you quit immediately if your personal safety is at risk.
 
Let me now expand briefly on the three reasons why you almost never quit a job on the spot.
 
ONE – You hold yourself accountable by honoring your employment agreement – to give notice. Even if you do not have an employment agreement, with a notice clause, you can use the generally accepted practice of two weeks (or one week, if you cannot afford two weeks). This measure reflects on who you are and what you stand for – i.e. your principles.
 
TWO – You demonstrate respect for an employer, even if you have been treated poorly. It is easy to say, “I have been treated like dirt in this place. They do not deserve any better from me now.” If you engage that line of reasoning, then you would be stooping down to the same low-level of conduct that you condemn. This too reflects on who you are and what you stand for.
 
THREE – You demonstrate respect for an employer’s customers – who funded your payroll. Often times we lose sight of the fact that an employer employs you to help serve the interest of its customers who are paying money for a product or a service. Those customers make it possible for the employer to maintain the business that employs you. Yes, you may never know those customers, if you are not customer-facing, but they are there. And, you may have customers of your own too someday.
 
These three reasons reflect one main theme – RESPECT - for yourself and for others.
 
--- N. Taiwo (EKTIMIS)
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Reshape your thinking...with principles that govern respect on a personal level (social circles). - Principles put to music.
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"Those who strive for perfection in character will always fall short; but they will achieve much more than those who strive for mediocrity, who will never fall short." - N. Taiwo, December 2009
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