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P/Shoemaker-Levy 9 in Jupiter
Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image of comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9, taken on May 17, 1994, with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) in wide field mode. When the comet was observed, its train of 21 icy fragments stretched ac...
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Success! NASA's Juno spacecraft is now orbiting Jupiter!
Congratulations to the entire Juno team!
Engine burn complete. Juno is poised to unlock the planet's secrets.
This artist's rendering shows NASA's Juno spacecraft above the north pole of Jupiter.

Launched in 2011, the Juno spacecraft has arrived at Jupiter in 2016 to study the giant planet from an elliptical, polar orbit. Juno will repeatedly dive between the planet and its intense belts of charged particle radiation, coming only 5,000 kilometers (about 3,000 miles) from the cloud tops at closest approach.

Juno's primary goal is to improve our understanding of Jupiter's formation and evolution. The spacecraft will spend a little over a year investigating the planet's origins, interior structure, deep atmosphere and magnetosphere. Juno's study of Jupiter will help us to understand the history of our own solar system and provide new insight into how planetary systems form and develop in our galaxy and beyond.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., manages the Juno mission for the principal investigator, Scott Bolton, of Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. The Juno mission is part of the New Frontiers Program managed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the spacecraft. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

More information about Juno is online at www.nasa.gov/juno and http://missionjuno.swri.edu

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Release Date: July 4, 2016

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#NASA #Astronomy #Space #Science #Jupiter #Planet #Juno #Solar #Spacecraft #Exploration #SolarSystem #Technology #Engineering #STEM #Education #JPL #Pasadena #California #USA #UnitedStates #LockheedMartin #MSFC #Marshall #SwRI #Artist #Illustration
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“The Spire” è un pilastro di polvere e gas freddo di circa 9.5 anni luce, dalla figura ispirata ad alata fiabesca creatura in posa sopra un piedistallo. Si trova all’interno della Nebulosa dell'Aquila (Messier 16), situata a circa 7.000 anni luce di distanza dalla Terra nella costellazione settentrionale del Serpente.
La Nebulosa Aquila contiene diverse sculture come questa. In effetti, la Nebulosa Aquila è un guscio gigante di gas e polveri l'interno del quale è una cavità crescente riempita con una spettacolare nursery stellare, dove in nubi di gas idrogeno freddo l’energia delle giovani stelle scolpisce scenari di fantasia.
La luce delle stelle è anche responsabile dell'illuminazione nebbiosa della torre, dove il gas in evaporazione crea la foschia intorno alla struttura evidenziando la sua forma tridimensionale.
Queste zone possono sembrare piccole, ma sono quasi le dimensioni del nostro Sistema Solare, le stelle nascenti hanno continuato a crescere alimentate al largo della nube di gas circostante.

Questa immagine è stata scattata nel novembre 2004 Hubble Space Telescope. I colori dominanti nell'immagine sono stati prodotti da gas alimentato da potenti raggi ultravioletti dell’ammasso stellare.
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*NGC 6357: Cathedral to Massive Stars *
 
How massive can a normal star be? Estimates made from distance, brightness and standard solar models had given one star in the open cluster Pismis 24 over 200 times the mass of our Sun, making it one of the most massive stars known. This star is the brightest object locatedjust above the gas front in the featured image. Close inspection of images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope, however, have shown that Pismis 24-1 derives its brilliant luminosity not from a single star but from three at least. Component stars would still remain near 100 solar masses, making them among the more massive stars currently on record. Toward the bottom of the image, stars are still forming in the associated emission nebula NGC 6357. Appearing perhaps like a Gothic cathedral, energetic stars near the center appear to be breaking out and illuminating aspectacular cocoon.
 
Image Credit: NASA, ESA and Jesús Maíz Apellániz (IAA, Spain); Acknowledgement: Davide De Martin (ESA/Hubble)
 
#spaceexploration #hubble #esa
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Radio imágenes de Hércules A por Chandra
Radio images of Hercules A Chandra
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Martes 2 de Diciembre de 2014 Algunas galaxias tienen núcleos extremadamente brillantes, lo que sugiere que contienen un agujero negro supermasivo que está tirando en la materia a un ritmo prodigioso. Lo...
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#astronomy This is an image of the Black Widow Pulsar moving through our galaxy at one million kilometers per hour. That is its bow shock wave. It looks like the grim reaper to me and if it passed too close to us, it would be
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Juno spacecraft's solar panels are turned towards the sun! | NASA
Juno has power! Its tour of Jupiter has started with an initial 53.5-day orbit. This illustration depicts NASA's Juno spacecraft at Jupiter, with its solar arrays and main antenna pointed toward the distant sun and Earth. Juno is the first solar-powered spacecraft designed to operate at such a great distance from the sun.

"Jupiter is five times farther from the sun than Earth, and the sunlight that reaches that far out packs 25 times less punch," said Rick Nybakken, Juno's project manager from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "While our massive solar arrays will be generating only 500 watts when we are at Jupiter, Juno is very efficiently designed, and it will be more than enough to get the job done."

Launched in 2011, Juno is the first solar-powered spacecraft designed to operate at such a great distance from the sun. That's why the surface area of solar panels required to generate adequate power is quite large. The four-ton Juno spacecraft carries three 30-foot-long (9-meter) solar arrays festooned with 18,698 individual solar cells. At Earth distance from the sun, the cells have the potential to generate approximately 14 kilowatts of electricity. But transport those same rectangles of silicon and gallium arsenide to a fifth rock from the sun distance, and it's a powerfully different story.

NASA's Juno mission to Jupiter has broken the record to become humanity's most distant solar-powered emissary. The previous record-holder was the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft, whose orbit peaked out at the 492-million-mile (792-million-kilometer) mark in October 2012, during its approach to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

Juno's primary goal is to improve our understanding of Jupiter's formation and evolution. The spacecraft will spend a little over a year investigating the planet's origins, interior structure, deep atmosphere and magnetosphere. Juno's study of Jupiter will help us to understand the history of our own solar system and provide new insight into how planetary systems form and develop in our galaxy and beyond.

"Juno is all about pushing the edge of technology to help us learn about our origins," said Scott Bolton, Juno principal investigator at the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. "We use every known technique to see through Jupiter's clouds and reveal the secrets Jupiter holds of our solar system's early history. It just seems right that the sun is helping us learn about the origin of Jupiter and the other planets that orbit it."

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., manages the Juno mission for the principal investigator, Scott Bolton, of Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. The Juno mission is part of the New Frontiers Program managed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the spacecraft. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

More information about Juno is online at www.nasa.gov/juno and http://missionjuno.swri.edu

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Release Date: July 4, 2016

+NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory 
+NASA Goddard 
+NASA's Marshall Center 
+NASA Solar System Exploration 
+Lockheed Martin 
+National Science Teachers Association 
+PBS KIDS 
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#NASA #Astronomy #Space #Science #Jupiter #Planet #Juno #Solar #Spacecraft #Exploration #SolarSystem #Technology #Engineering #STEM #Education #JPL #Pasadena #California #USA #UnitedStates #LockheedMartin #MSFC #Marshall #SwRI #Artist #Illustration 
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Very Beautiful
The Southern Cliff in the Lagoon

 Undulating bright ridges and dusty clouds cross this close-up of the nearby star forming region M8, also known as the Lagoon Nebula. A sharp, false-color composite of narrow band visible and broad band near-infrared data from the 8-meter Gemini South Telescope, the entire view spans about 20 light-years through a region of the nebula sometimes called the Southern Cliff. The highly detailed image explores the association of many newborn stars imbedded in the tips of the bright-rimmed clouds and Herbig-Haro objects. Abundant in star-forming regions, Herbig-Haro objects are produced as powerful jets emitted by young stars in the process of formation heat the surrounding clouds of gas and dust. The cosmic Lagoon is found some 5,000 light-years away toward constellation Sagittarius and the center of our Milky Way Galaxy.

Credit: Julia I. Arias and Rodolfo H. Barbá (Dept. Fisica, Univ. de La Serena), ICATE-CONICET, Gemini Observatory/AURA
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