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Edward Hervey
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Edward Hervey

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Much of the Open Source community tries to advertise the community as one happy place to the outside. Where contributions are valued only by their technical quality, and everybody meets at conferences for beers.

Well, it is not like that. It's quite a sick place to be in.

I don't usually talk about this too much, and hence I figure that people are really not aware of this, but yes, the Open Source community is full of assholes, and I probably more than most others am one of their most favourite targets. I get hate mail for hacking on Open Source. People have started multiple "petitions" on petition web sites, asking me to stop working (google for it). Recently, people started collecting Bitcoins to hire a hitman for me (this really happened!). Just the other day, some idiot posted a "song" on youtube, a creepy work, filled with expletives about me and suggestions of violence. People post websites about boycotting my projects, containing pretty personal attacks. On IRC, people /msg me sometimes, with nasty messages, and references to artwork in 4chan style. And there's more. A lot more.

I am used to rough discussions on mailing lists, and yes, when I was younger I did not always stay technical in flamewars, but nowadays I am pretty good at that, I am sometimes articulate, but never personal. I have a thick skin (and so do most of the others involved in systemd, apparently), and I figure that plays a major role why we managed to bring systemd to success, despite all the pressure in the opposite direction. But from time to time, I just have to stand back and say "Wow, what an awful community Linux has!".

The Internet is full of deranged people, no doubt, so one might just discount all of this on the grounds that the Open Source community isn't any different than any other community on the Internet or even offline. But I don't think so. I am pretty sure there are certain things that foster bad behaviour. On one hand there are certain communities where it appears to be a lot more accepted to vent hate, communities that attract a certain kind of people (Hey, Gentoo!) more than others do. (Yes, the folks who post the stuff they do usually pretty clearly state from wich community they come).

But more importantly, I'd actually put some blame on a certain circle of folks that play a major role in kernel development, and first and foremost Linus Torvalds himself. By many he is a considered a role model, but he is quite a bad one. If he posts words like "[specific folks] ...should be retroactively aborted. Who the f*ck does idiotic things like that? How did they not die as babies, considering that they were likely too stupid to find a tit to suck on?" (google for it), than that's certainly bad. But what I find particularly appalling is the fact that he regularly defends this, and advertises this as an efficient way to run a community. (But it is not just Linus, it's a certain group of people around him who use the exact same style, some of which semi-publically even phantasize about the best ways to, ... well, kill me).

But no, it's not an efficient way to run a community. If Linux had success, then that certainly happened despite, not because of this behaviour. I am pretty sure the damage being done by this is quite obvious, it not only sours the tone in the Linux community, it is also teaches new contributors to adopt the same style, but that only if it doesn't scare them away in the first place.

In other words: A fish rots from the head down.

I don't mind using strong language, I don't mind the use of words such as "fuck", I use the word all the time too, it's really not about that. I must simply say that I wished it would stay at that, because what actually is happening is so much worse, and and so much more hateful.

If you are a newcomer to Linux, either grow a really thick skin. Or run away, it's not a friendly place to be in. It is sad that it is that way, but it certainly is.

The Linux community is dominated by western, white, straight, males in their 30s and 40s these days. I perfectly fit in that pattern, and the rubbish they pour over me is awful. I can only imagine that it is much worse for members of minorities, or people from different cultural backgrounds, in particular ones where losing face is a major issue.

You know, I can deal with all this shit, and I guess in a way with the energy we are pushing the changes we propose with we are calling for opposition, so this post is really not intended to be a call for sympathy. The main point I want to make with this is to correct a few things about our communities, and how their are percieved. Open Source isn't a kindergarten. Open Source is awful in many ways, and people should be aware of this.

Not everybody in the Linux community is like this, the vast majority isn't. Not even all our different communities really have a problem with this at all. But many do, and the most prominent one, the Linux community as a whole certainly has.

I am not the one to fix any of this, I cannot tell you how one could do it. And quite frankly, I really don't want to be involved in fixing this. I am a technical guy, I want to do technical things.

My personal conclusion out of all this is mostly just that I don't want to have much to do with the worst offenders, and the communities they run. My involvement with the kernel community ended pretty much before it even started, I never post on LKML, and haven't done in years.  Also, in our own project we are policying posts. We regularly put a few folks on moderation on the mailing list, and we will continue to do so. Currently, the systemd community is fantastic, and I really hope we can keep it that way.

And that's all about this topic from me. I have no intentions to ever talk about this again on a public forum.
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David Gerber's profile photo
 
Back in the days, the Amiga community was much worse ;)
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Edward Hervey

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GStreamer hackfest at GUADEC !
Le Pitivi & GStreamer Hackfest 2014
Wed, July 30, 2014, 5:00 AM
Le Strasbourg, la France

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Edward Hervey

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epic :)
We recently had a curious bug report from a Samba user. The bug report showed a strange hang in our provision script. Andrew Bartlett worked with the user to get a gdb backtrace, which showed that an internal heimdal library was calling out to a net_read() function in /opt/lib/libmediaclient.so.
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Marc Ordinas i Llopis's profile photoDavid Zeuthen's profile photo
 
Incredible! And they just kept on defending their "methods" on the comments :-P
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Edward Hervey

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This is definitely one of the coolest projects I've ever stumbled upon. Congrats +Andrew Kelley. Great stuff!!
Statically Recompiling NES Games into Native Executables with LLVM and Go. 2013 June 7. I have always wanted to write an emulator. I made a half-hearted attempt in college but it never made it to a demo-able state. I also didn't want to write Yet Another Emulator.
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Måns Rullgård's profile photoBastien Nocera's profile photoMarcelo Hashimoto's profile photo
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Yeah, but a NES on my computer is more interesting than running a program (I could already run on my machine) on a machine I'd never own.
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Edward Hervey

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Pēteris Krišjānis's profile photo
 
Just awesome human being, my respect for him just went sky high. Maybe there's reason no matter what he's playing, we can relate to him.
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Edward Hervey

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En quelques heures, 9.000 citoyens ont signé l'appel au président de la République pour une grande loi de moralisation de la vie publique, sur http://www.moralisation.fr. Soutenez et relayez cet appel autour de vous. Ensemble, obtenons la moralisation !
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Edward Hervey's profile photoJean Chalard's profile photo
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Je n'ai pas dit que je n'aimais pas la proposition.

Mais je n'approuve pas ses façons de faire. Que sa proposition de proportionnelle existe depuis longtemps ou pas ne change rien. La vérité, c'est qu'il saisit la chance du scandale actuel pour faire revenir sa proposition de moralisation sur le devant de la scène, qu'il sait que les gens vont signer à cause du scandale récent. Jusqu'ici, je n'ai rien à redire, je trouve que c'est à la fois une bonne chose, une bonne proposition, et que c'est bien joué de sa part. Il a raison de saisir l'occasion, et il le fait de la bonne façon.

Mais il en profite pour faire passer au plein milieu une autre proposition à lui qui n'a rien à voir avec le sujet qui nous occupe. Et ça je suis désolé, c'est malhonnête.
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Edward Hervey

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GStreamer 1.4.0 Available!!
RELEASE: GStreamer Core, Plugins and RTSP server 1.4.0 (source & binaries). Sebastian Dröge sebastian at centricular.com. Mon Jul 21 00:23:35 PDT 2014. Previous message: RELEASE: GStreamer Core, Plugins and RTSP server 1.3.91 (source & binaries); Messages sorted by: [ date ] [ thread ] [ subject ] ...
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Edward Hervey

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Doesn't anyone else in the open source community feel concerned that a lot of the discussions we have on G+ are owned by Google and can't (in as far as I know) be archived/retrieved by 3rd parties. I'm beginning to feel very uneasy about some of the info in here.
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Marc Ordinas i Llopis's profile photo
 
Yep… We seem to have accepted G+ in good faith given Google's past record on data availability (Google Takeout) and use of open standards (gtalk based on XMPP). But now Google seems to have fallen into the 'to beat Facebook we have to be like Facebook' mindset (which I think is completely wrong), closing our data, eschewing open APIs and standards, etc.

The big question is: Is it possible to have a viable social communication tool, more advanced than email lists, based on open standards and open data? So far the answer is no :(
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Edward Hervey

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Busy day for Wayland today.

+Matthias Clasen created the feature page for the Fedora + GNOME Wayland transition: https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Changes/Wayland.  This is part of the process of getting features into Fedora, so it's exciting to see the page go up.  I'll be at GUADEC in Brno this week and we'll have a panel discussion about Wayland and much more.

+Rob Clark reports that Weston now runs on Freedeno, the open source driver for Adreno GPUs: http://freedreno.github.io/.  G+ posting should be just around the corner.

Alex Davy has been getting hybrid GPUs support working, Experimental Prime support on Wayland, that is, a client running on an AMD HD7730m discrete GPU, rendering into a window, then composited by Weston running on the Intel GPU.  Thanks to the DRM PRIME infrastructure by +Dave Airlie this was surprisingly easy.  Still experimental work, many open issues, but very cool.

Last, but not least, +Carlos Garnacho just announced a new experimental, low-level toolkit, Mechane (http://blogs.gnome.org/carlosg/2013/07/29/introducing-mechane-guadec/) - written for Wayland initially.
Wayland. Summary. Port the GNOME desktop to Wayland. Owner. Name: Matthias Clasen and the desktop team; Email: mclasen@redhat.com, desktop@lists.fedoraproject.org; Release notes owner: Current status. Targeted release: Fedora 21; Last updated: 2013-07-29; Tracker bug: ...
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Edward Hervey

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True .... sadly
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Kenneth Rohde Christiansen's profile photoAlexandre Prokoudine's profile photoGlenn Pierce's profile photoZeeshan Ali's profile photo
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Not quite.
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Edward Hervey

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The BERG x Google Creative Labs Connbox ... with a software stack from everyone's favourite open source consultancy :)
Videophones in film from BERG on Vimeo. The video call is still often talked about as the next big thing in mobile phones (Apple used FaceTime as a central part of their iphone marketing, while Microsoft bought Skype to bolster their tablet and phone strategy). But somehow video calling has been ...
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Edward Hervey

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I finally got a splitter and 10m extension coax cord for DVB-C in the office so I can finally do DVB testing/hacking on a more regular basis (as opposed to going in the living room with a laptop).
A few items I'll be reviewing and working on next (some are reviewing pending patches): Port to Linux DVB API v5 (for cleaner code and support of more frontends live DVB-S2), faster tuning support (i.e. kill most of the usleep in the code and replace with poll), move more code to a helper thread (for stats and status querying for example), experiment with injecting PMT info from source (to speed up setup of downstream mpeg-ts parse and demuxer).

Once all that is done, I can finally start working on the "reverse QoS" system. Right now elements that estimate remote clocks (needed for RTP and DVB) modify the outgoing buffer timestamps (so they synchronize locally at the same speed as they were produced remotely) . While that is fine for playback use-cases, it completely screws up scenarios where you want to do transcoding or the live stream or any other transformation (you end up with bogus timestamp deltas in the transformed streams).
The idea with reverse QoS is that instead of modifying the timestamps you send downstream at regular interval the information needed to correct synchronization for those streams (running-time delta to apply and rate modifier (> 1.0 being synchronize faster, < 1.0 slower). Synchronization algorithms (and clock users) can then use that information to correct the synchronization times.
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Robert Swain's profile photoLuca Barbato's profile photoEdward Hervey's profile photoZaheer Merali's profile photo
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Good stuff Edward, about time they get attention! 
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