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Ed Yong
Works at Science writer
Attended University of Cambridge
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Ed Yong

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Clearly shows that fur seals are closer to sea lions than to "true" seals.
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In an act of transformation worthy of any magician, scientists have converted scar tissue in the hearts of living mice into beating heart cells. If the same trick works in humans (and we’re still several years away from a trial), it could lead us to a long-sought prize of medicine – a way to mend a broken heart.
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metaphorical reflection, however many scientists advance their experiments, never will be able to heal the wound of a broken heart
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Today I learned that kangaroos have three vaginas. Click on the link to find out more (SFW).
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nossa...ate os cangurus sabem controlar sua população...eles tem uma organização bem melhor que algumas regiões do brasil...que nada...quanto mais gente...mais amizades né....rsrsrs
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‘Wasp’ is an English word, but ‘telk’ is not. You and I know this because we speak English. But in a French laboratory, six baboons have also learned to tell the difference between genuine English words, and nonsense ones. They can sort their wasps from their telks, even though they have no idea that the former means a stinging insect and the latter means nothing. They don’t understand the language, but can ‘read’ nonetheless.
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This gives me some ideas for a reading module for first-graders that I'm working on.
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Many insect colonies have troops of soldiers, which defend their nests with special weapons like massive jaws or chemical guns. Kladothrips intermedius is no exception – this tiny insect, known as a thrips, has soldiers that supposedly crush their enemies to death with butch forearms. But contrary to appearances, these big arms aren’t all that useful for fighting. Instead, they’re living pharmacies. Christine Turnbull from Macquarie University and Holly Caravan from Memorial University of Newfoundland have found that the thrips warriors are actually healers.
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Thrips, like fruit flies, are a great topic for citizen science. 
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London’s streets are a mess. Roads bend sharply, end abruptly, and meet each other at unlikely angles. Intuitively, you might think that the cells of our brain are arranged in a similarly haphazard pattern, forming connections in random places and angles. But a new study suggests that our mental circuitry is more like Manhattan’s organised grid than London’s chaotic tangle.

It consists of sheets of fibres that intersect at right angles, with no diagonals anywhere to be seen.Van Wedeen from Massachusetts General Hospital, who led the study, says that his results came as a complete shock. “I was expecting it to be a pure mess,” he says. Instead, he found a regular criss-cross pattern like the interlocking fibres of a piece of cloth.

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/notrocketscience/2012/03/29/the-brain-is-full-of-manhattan-like-grids/
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Sounds like my brain. Somethings I will never forget even though I would like to. Kinda like telling a story about a tragedy in your life and you start to cry from reliving it all over again. Or like a smell you never forget. My brain is full of Scared memories that have only made me stronger. If it keeps up I might turn into a guy that can walk on water!
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Have him in circles
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Ed Yong

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This post is written in a font made from DNA (and there's a link at the bottom that explains how it works)
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"every link posted here drove 1/100th the amount of traffic to the respective site than one posted on Twitter. That combined with the generally poorer quality of comments"
— I have my doubts that the 140-character comments on Twitter can be generally of better quality. Or perhaps are just your followers.
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Out of all the possible molecules in the world, just two form the basis of life’s grand variety: DNA and RNA. They encode the stuff of every whale, ant, flower, tree and bacterium.

But scientists have now developed six alternative polymers called XNAs that can also store genetic information and evolve through natural selection. None of them are found in nature. They are part of a dawning era of “synthetic genetics”, which expands the chemistry of life in new uncharted directions.

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/notrocketscience/2012/04/19/synthetic-xna-molecules-can-evolve-and-store-genetic-information-just-like-dna/
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Isn't it somewhat risky? How do you hedge risks of future mutations?

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is very interesting, the subject of scientific discoveries
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Sometimes I write about parasitic wasps that hijack the bodies of other insects. Well, here's a virus that controls the minds of those wasps. It's parasites all the way down.
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Isn't this going to mean that the virus spreads to the strongest offspring in each successive generation, thus enhancing it's own viability?
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Will we ever have a fool-prooflie-detector? Unlikely, for several reason that I outline in my new BBC column
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I would like to sit in one for a couple of day's and tell my life story just so everyone would believe the wild stuff that I have been through in my life. 
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A living tick, FILMED under a scanning electron microscope, waving hello. That. Is. Hardcore.
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medeni
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Have him in circles
481,629 people
Work
Occupation
Science writer
Employment
  • Science writer
    present
Places
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Currently
London
Previously
Story
Tagline
Science writer, geek, husband
Introduction
Award-winning British science writer; creator of the blog Not Exactly Rocket Science; published in New Scientist, the Times, WIRED, the Guardian, Nature, the Daily Telegraph, the Economist and more.
Bragging rights
Won National Academies Keck 2010 Science Communication Award, 3 Quarks Daily Science Prize 2010, Research Blogging Awards 2010, ABSW Best Newcomer Award 2009 and Daily Telegraph Science Writer Award 2007.
Education
  • University of Cambridge
    Natural Sciences, 1999 - 2002
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Male