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Economic Sociology and Political Economy
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The global community, led by Oleg Komlik, of academics, practitioners, and activists interested in Economic Sociology and Political Economy
The global community, led by Oleg Komlik, of academics, practitioners, and activists interested in Economic Sociology and Political Economy

447 followers
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On the patrimonial system of white male privilege and a 'revolving door': Gender and racial #inequality provide a key to explaining why Hedge Funds drive the divide between the rich and the rest.
https://economicsociology.org/2018/11/09/elite-men-and-inequality-in-the-hedge-fund-industry/
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See below a list of great academic opportunities: 7 calls for papers for conferences and workshops, 3 job openings, 2 post-doc and visiting positions, and a doctoral fellowship — in various areas of economic sociology, political economy, and related fields, with October 31 – December 1 deadlines
https://economicsociology.org/2018/10/30/great-academic-opportunities-6-calls-for-papers-3-jobs-2-postdoc-and-visiting-positions-phd-stipend/
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A fresh Nobel Prize winner Paul Romer: "For more than three decades, macroeconomics has gone backwards", "Mathiness lets [economics’] academic politics masquerade as science". Read and share Romer's astute reflections on the state of #economics profession.
https://economicsociology.org/2018/10/08/nobel-winner-paul-romer-economists-use-math-to-mislead/
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James March, a distinguished social scientist and great master of organizational and institutional theory, passed away. But only a few know that beside his tremendous academic career, March was also an accomplished poet. Poetry, he wrote, "is an exploration of ambivalence and paradox, of the possibility of feeling simultaneous sentiments that seem contradictory, of living in multiple worlds and experiencing multiple feelings, and of recognizing the role of ugliness in the creation of beauty.” R.I.P.
https://economicsociology.org/2018/09/28/r-i-p-james-march-success/
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“What do border guards and central bankers have in common? Both operate, on a day-to-day basis, in political spaces exempt from many of the norms of liberal democratic politics and yet have the power to define and constrain them." Jacqueline Best presents thought-provoking discussion and arguments on the power of technocratic exceptionalism
https://economicsociology.org/2018/09/12/central-banks-technocratic-power-and-the-fear-of-democracy/
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B&B: Herbert Marcuse // The Adjunct Crisis // Against Capitalist Orthodoxy // Gender and finance // History of taxing the rich // (Im)mobility in the rural America // Inventing Thanksgiving

This time, especially worth reading and sharing articles:

> Herbert Marcuse on how the Frankfurt School reevaluated Marxism following the failure of crises to destroy capitalism, the philosophical roots of the student rebellions of the 1960s, and more — in a 1977 interesting video interview with Bryan Magee

> The adjunctification of the Professorial Class. The biggest problem with organizing around labor issues in academia is that academics are loath to see themselves as labourers; but intellectual work and teaching are labour — by Nair Yasmin

> The fundamental problems of capitalism are: weak and unstable growth; stagnant living standards and rising inequality; and environmental risk. Which economic ideas can successfully tackle these challenges today? — by Michael Jacobs and Mariana Mazzucato

> Gender power relations and financial governance: reflections on the position of women within broader class struggles regarding finance and money in the history of the modern state — Adrienne Roberts elaborates on Aamuel Knafo’s The Making of Modern Finance

> Analyzing two centuries’ history of progressive taxation in the US, Canada and Europe. Christopher May reviews Taxing the Rich: A History of Fiscal Fairness in the United States and Europe, by Kenneth Scheve and David Stasavag

> Moving no longer means social mobility; staying no longer means immobility. As America’s rural communities stagnate, what can we learn from one that hasn’t? — by Larissa MacFarquar

> Commercial invention of tradition: How businesses and advertising shaped Thanksgiving as we know it — by Samantha N. N. Cross
https://economicsociology.org/2018/09/07/bb-herbert-marcuse-the-adjunct-crisis-against-capitalist-orthodoxy-gender-and-finance-history-of-taxing-the-rich-immobility-in-the-rural-america-inventing-thanksgiving/
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#Economics > I rest my case 😉
Or, at least, Max Weber has been assigned to teach it.. 🙂
https://economicsociology.org/2018/09/03/economics-as-religion/
Economics as Religion
Economics as Religion
economicsociology.org
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Miss Prism: “Cecily, you will read your Political Economy in my absence. The chapter on the fall of the Rupee you may omit. It is somewhat too sensational. Even these metallic problems have their melodramatic side.”
Cecily [Picks up books and throws them]: “Horrid Political Economy!…“
😏
https://economicsociology.org/2018/08/25/the-melodramatic-side-of-political-economy/
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An illuminating network analysis of the possible ways in which the Matthew effect unfolds in top sociology journals
https://economicsociology.org/2018/08/21/sociological-journals-and-network-proprieties-of-the-st-matthew-effect/
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