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Economic Sociology and Political Economy
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The global community, led by Oleg Komlik, of academics, practitioners, and activists interested in Economic Sociology and Political Economy
The global community, led by Oleg Komlik, of academics, practitioners, and activists interested in Economic Sociology and Political Economy

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“This work has been carried out despite the economical difficulties of the authors’ country. The authors want to overall remark the clear contribution of the Spanish Government in destroying the R&D horizon of Spain and the future of a complete generation” (Padilla et al. 2014: 475)

Contrary to this “Acknowledgments” section, cleverly used by the researchers to submit an alarming, justified, and serious protestation, see here the posts featuring funny and witty scholars’ “Acknowledgments" :-)
https://economicsociology.org/2018/07/17/probably-the-best-acknowledgments-ever-4/
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"Another difference between Milton Friedman and myself is that everything reminds Milton of the money supply. Well, everything reminds me of sex, but I keep it out of my papers.” Read more on Robert Solow’s sarcastic #economics:
https://economicsociology.org/2018/07/14/robert-solows-sarcastic-economics/amp/
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>> Galore

Money fills our body to the brim,
creates our shape, our taste, the so-called self-esteem.
The shiny teeth earmark our polished fame,
the slickness crystallized since #money rinsed our shame
into a sewer of repressed self-blame.

(by Oleg Komlik)
https://economicsociology.org/2018/07/12/galore/amp/
Galore
Galore
economicsociology.org
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Michel Callon: "Homo economicus really does exist. Of course, he exists in the form of many species and his lineage is multiple and ramified... He is formatted, framed and equipped with prostheses which help him in his calculations and which are, for the most part, produced by economics... It is not a matter of giving a soul back to a dehumanized agent, nor of rejecting the very idea of his existence. The objective may be to explore the diversity of calculative agencies forms and distributions, and hence of organized markets"
Read the full conclusion from Callon’s 1998 programmatic statement about the performativity of #economics:
https://economicsociology.org/2018/07/07/economic-sociology-homo-economicus-and-performativity-of-economics/
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Is IMF more ideationally pluralist, and yet more political, than most analysts have shown to date? Yes, reveals a new excellent book by Ben Clift.
So how does the #IMF use its knowledge bank, expertise and mandate for surveillance and coordination to act as a global arbiter of legitimate policy? What the role did IMF play in shaping advanced economy policy responses to the global financial crisis and the Eurozone crisis? In his important and empirically rich book, Clift masterly opens the ‘black box’ of internal IMF debates and practices to develop a novel theory of ideational change in international organisations.
https://economicsociology.org/2018/06/29/the-imfs-reconstruction-of-economic-orthodoxy-since-the-crash/amp/
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Friedrich #Hayek – the leading scholastic machinist of #Neoliberalism:
“No doubt an American or English “Fascist” system would greatly differ from the Italian or German models; no doubt, if the transition were effected without violence, we might expect to get a better type of leader. And, if I had to live under a Fascist system, I have no doubt that I would rather live under one run by Englishmen or Americans than under one run by anyone else. Yet all this does not mean that, judged on our present standards, our #Fascist system would in the end prove so very different or much less intolerable than its prototypes.” See the full quote and the source:
https://economicsociology.org/2018/06/26/free-to-choose-hayeks-road-to-fascism/amp/
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See below a list of great academic opportunities: 12 calls for papers for conferences and workshops (some are fully or partially funded), 3 job openings, 2 summer schools, a postdoc position, PhD fellowship, an award — with June 22 — July 11 deadlines. Share this post with your colleagues and students. Good luck!
https://economicsociology.org/2018/06/19/great-academic-opportunities-11-calls-for-papers-2-jobs-postdoc-summer-school-award/amp/
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B&B: Geographies of tax evasion // Artifices of the Chicago School // Socialism in the US // Profit and Gift in the Digital Economy // German corporate entrepreneurs // Mortgage fraud

> What do we know about the geographies of #tax evasion and tax havens? Essence and details – by Manuel B. Aalbers

> The artifices of the Chicago School of #economics, the limits of #neoliberalism, and moving beyond the laws of the #market — an interview with Will Davies

> A century ago, #Socialism appeared as an actual political alternative in the US. Why and how did it happen and end? — by Melvyn Dubofsky

> “An ontology for the digital age?” Jamie Morgan’s review of David Elder-Vass’ Profit and Gift in the #DigitalEconomy

> German immigrants and the promotion of corporate #entrepreneurship in 19th Century America — by Robert Wright

> Nearly 25% of 2003-05 residential mortgage #loans in the US contained one or more indications of fraud. The rates of #mortgage #fraud were higher in areas with a larger share of loans originated by independent mortgage companies and higher levels of racial segregation; it was less prevalent where government-sponsored enterprises purchased a larger share of the loans sold in secondary mortgage markets.
https://economicsociology.org/2018/05/31/bb-geographies-of-tax-evasion-artifices-of-the-chicago-school-socialism-in-the-us-profit-and-gift-in-the-digital-economy-german-corporate-entrepreneurs-mortgage-fraud/
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Why have been “common good” frames frequently embraced for environmental issues and rejected for global labor issues? Tim Bartley reflects on his new book "Rules without Rights: Land, Labor, and Private Authority in the Global Economy", wondering whether Karl Polanyi was wrong regarding 'fictitious commodities'?
https://economicsociology.org/2018/05/26/was-karl-polanyi-wrong-land-labor-and-private-authority-in-the-global-economy/
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