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Eat the World NYC
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A travel guide to NYC and its many eating adventures.
A travel guide to NYC and its many eating adventures.

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UKRAINE 🇺🇦
Dispatch from Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn:
The block of Coney Island Avenue between Avenue P and Quentin Road has become sort of a Black Sea dining destination over the years, with the nations that surround this continent-straddling body of water almost all represented within a few meters of each other. Taci's Beyti (Turkey) has been around longer than most restaurants in the city, while newer ones like Slavyanskiy Bazar (Russia) and Argo Restaurant (Georgia) seem to have taken hold as well. Azerbaijan, removed from the Black Sea by a few hundred kilometers is there too at Village Cafe. While Bulgaria and Romania are unfortunately left out, the northern shores of the sea have representation here at Rondel with its Ukrainian food.
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Ukrainian cuisine might be seen through at least two different lenses if you look beyond the names of common dishes. The first would be if we had a Ukrainian grandmother and visited her in Kiev during holidays, enjoying the feasts she prepared for the family using recipes passed down from her mother and grandmother. The second, and the lense in which Ukrainian food is seen here at Rondel, is that in which some of its dishes were co-opted by the Soviet Union after its creation and became part of the spectrum of Soviet foods enjoyed throughout the vast empire. Foods from Ukraine and the Caucasus, particularly Georgia, become well-known and beloved throughout after the first world war.
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For this reason, you will notice some differences between the food here and the simple preparations at Streecha in the East Village. Waves of Ukrainian immigration has landed many tens of thousands of people in the East Village since the end of the 1800's, whereas the Russian-dominated landscape of South Brooklyn and its foods is more Soviet-style.
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📍 Rondel, 2006 Coney Island Ave, Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn.
ℹ️ The full story today on our website.
Rondel
Rondel
eattheworldnyc.com
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JAPAN 🇯🇵
Dispatch from Jersey City, New Jersey:
When talking about "Big 3" regional styles of ramen, most people outside of Japan have heard of Hakata and Sapporo styles, both having evolved from large metropolitan areas with many vendors and varieties. But a third lesser known style was developed in northern Honshu in the small village of Kitakata which gives it its name. Known for its storehouses full of soy sauce, Kitakata-style ramen uses this as its base, a type of shoyu.
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The bowl itself appears simple, a broth full of noodles and topped with chashu and some thinly sliced spring onion, but do not let this fool you. This broth has been extracting pure umami from pork bones for "long hours" which gives it an almost smoky and toasted taste, full of earth and charcoal.
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Ban Nai is the most famous source of this style of ramen, with 62 locations around Japan. Here in the United States there are now two in Orange County, California, one outside of Chicago, and now one tucked into a grocery store in Jersey City.
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📍 Kitakata Ramen Ban Nai, 420 Grand Street, Jersey City, New Jersey.
ℹ️ The full story today on our website.
Kitakata Ramen Ban Nai
Kitakata Ramen Ban Nai
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SINGAPORE 🇸🇬
Dispatch from Murray Hill, Queens:
Yummy Tummy Asian Bistro has a menu full of Southeast and Far Asian foods, but focuses its heart on the cuisine of Singapore, a nation with an incredible mashup itself. Anyone who has traveled to Singapore comes away with an awe from the food. Simple eateries are everywhere, but most pack such an immense amount of deliciousness. There are collisions of culture that make the food so satisfying, as if it is growing and evolving right before your eyes. No matter what ethnicity a resident of the country might be, it is the cuisine that is an immediate unifier.
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It is nice to see the emergence of another casual Singaporean eatery since the closing of wonderful Chomp Chomp in the West Village. While you may not walk out of the doors like you walk out of the food courts and hawker stalls of Singapore, skipping and whistling after amazing meals, the mostly Chinese-influenced Singaporean standards here are done pretty well and worth seeking out.
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Behind maybe only chicken rice and air conditioning, soft shell crab might be the third most loved thing in Singapore, and you cannot go long without being invited to join new friends to eat it. One of the most popular ways is to deep fry it and smother it in chilli sauce, which they do here as well ($28, below). I remember being overwhelmed with heat in Singapore, and while this dish is served with a slow burn that eventually comes up, it may be worth asking for some extra heat to eat the dish as intended.
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📍 Yummy Tummy Asian Bistro, Murray Hill, Queens.
ℹ️ The full story today on our website.
Yummy Tummy Asian Bistro
Yummy Tummy Asian Bistro
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GUATEMALA 🇬🇹
Dispatch from Prospect Lefferts Gardens, Brooklyn:
One of my favorite dishes in the entire city is the jocón at Tierras Centro Americanas in Jamaica, Queens, so I was ecstatic to see the dish listed on a second menu finally. The version here ($13) comes out looking perfect, topped with crisp green beans and a deep green color from tomatillos, cilantro, and green peppers. Toasted pumpkin seeds called pepitos, garlic, and onions provide the rest of the palate. Oddly left out was the heat that is usually a big part of this dish, which I later learned from the owner was an unfortunate byproduct of his customers who for the most part do not like spicy food.
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The menu is absolutely all over the map, with Spanish tortilla de huevo, sandwiches, kimchi soup, and plenty of breakfast options with high end coffee and tea. But look a little closer to some of the items, especially in the soups list, and you start to see some standouts. Alternatively you could find some of these soups on the menus of a Mexican or Guatemalan restaurant, but what they share in common is their roots in centuries old Mayan kitchens. Guatemalan dishes like pepian and jocón are just the tip of the iceberg for using ingredients to this culture that spanned the lands of what is now Guatemala and southern México.
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📍 Ix Restaurant, 43 Lincoln Road, Prospect Lefferts Gardens, Brooklyn.
ℹ️ The full story today on our website.
Ix Restaurant
Ix Restaurant
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MÉXICO 🇲🇽
Dispatch from Sunset Park, Brooklyn:
Two years ago this address was a windowless bookstore selling Spanish-language Christian texts, the facade of the small building completely covered in maroon paint. Now under a bright yellow awning, big windows let light into a space that since the end of 2017 has been churning out good Mexican food, with a focus on tortas, and has a space for customers to sit and eat.
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They are open early for breakfast and offer plenty of US and Mexican egg-based plates as well as an enormous chilaquiles, served at my request with salsa verde and two big slabs of cecina. Two fried eggs and a few slices of avocado top everything and it is served with a side of beans. It took a great effort to finish the whole thing.
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As noted in the name, they make excellent tortas here, Mexican sandwiches served on not quite round crusty bread known as bolillo. This bread is good here, delivered fresh daily I presume from somewhere nearby. On weekends, get freshly prepared carnitas and delicious tamales.
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📍 Tortas El Eden, 408 47th Street, Sunset Park, Brooklyn.
ℹ️ The full story today on our website.
Tortas El Eden
Tortas El Eden
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GUYANA 🇬🇾
Dispatch from South Richmond Hill, Queens:
In a two month long search to find Queens' best cricket bar for a story that never happened, I kept returning to The Hibiscus in South Richmond Hill. There were stories of the owner coming in long before opening time with his friends to catch a feed from somewhere on the subcontinent, the kind of thing many European expats and football fans in this country do at early opening bars so they can watch English Premier League or Italian Serie A.
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A lot of the menu, like most Guyanese restaurants in this section of Queens, is devoted to Guyanese-style Chinese food, a mashup with beautiful results. The jerk pork lo mein ($11.95) is one of these beauties, luscious and fatty hunks of pork full of pepper and spice placed right on top of overly sweet western-style lo mein noodles.
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The combination works well, and so do the rest of the entrees and appetizers that toe this line. Every country with Chinese immigrants (probably every country in the world?) has their own versions of tweaked Chinese foods to cater to local tastes, and Guyanese is up there in the running for the best.
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📍 The Hibiscus, 124-18 101st Street, South Richmond Hill, Queens.
ℹ️ The full story today on our website.
The Hibiscus
The Hibiscus
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JAPAN 🇯🇵
Dispatch from Midtown East, Manhattan:
The transition from East 49th Street to post-war 1950's or 60's Japan is almost done seamlessly, if only it wasn't for the random tourist couples that keep walking in, attracted by this ramen shop's good internet reviews and economical pricing. The bare bones interior may not seem like much, but that is the point. It is there to facilitate the needs of hungry customers, and get people drunk at night with an array of sake cups.

Around since the second half of 2014, this tiny ramen bar specializes in kakuni ramen. Kakuni uses a tonkotsu, or pork bone, base for the soup with special square slices of thick pork belly that give it the name. You can get this in three versions, all color coded. The white is the standard soup base, while black uses ma-yu garlic oil, and red delivers a small heat bump. All three versions use thin al dente noodles and start off with a high garlic quotient.

If you prefer your noodles thicker and wavy, opt for the tan tan ramen, which has about the same level of low spice and is served with ground pork. The base of this soup is a spicy miso chicken broth. This bowl is full of flavor and is a rival of some of the more famous tan tan bowls around town, especially at this price point.

Since this visit was during lunch, we did not partake in round after round of sake, but during these hours you can add their nice gyoza (below) to your ramen bowl for only $3. These are cooked very well, with super thin skin that is all pan-fried together.

📍 Nishida Sho-ten, 302 East 49th Street, Midtown East.
ℹ️ The full story today on our website.
Nishida Sho-ten
Nishida Sho-ten
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ITALY 🇮🇹 (Abruzzo)
Dispatch from Bryant Park, Manhattan:
To the rest of the world, any familiarity with the Southern Italian region of Abruzzo is usually through its extraordinary wines like Montepulciano and Trebbiano. A slightly overlooked place in terms of tourism, most of the region is dominated by the central mountains and Adriatic Sea coastline. Despite being considered part of the south of the country, if we use the boot graphic of Italy, Abruzzo would be about the meaty part of the calf. The simple fact of its geographical separation has kept the places here full of what some might call "old world charm."
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But travelers to Italy should take the time to drive over the mountains from Rome and explore this lesser-known region for its culture and food, something that the D'Abruzzo stand and pop-up vendor is vouching for. Currently you can find these treats at the Winter Village in Bryant Park, but in warmer months look out for it at food festivals and Smorgasburg.
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The top draw here and reason enough to book flights for a Abruzzese vacation are the arrosticini ($12.25 for a small order), mutton skewers full of fatty bits and unmarinated.
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Those fatty bits in between meat not only keep it very tender, they also drop a lot of juice down into the fire and create a nice smoke that makes it way through the park and probably pulls in quite a few customers. Bryant Park is not quite the old world, but if you close your eyes and are guided by only your senses of smell and taste it gets pretty close. My only complaint is that I cannot have a nice Montepulciano to enjoy with this lamb.
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📍 D'Abruzzo, Various locations/events.
ℹ️ The full story today on our website.
D'Abruzzo
D'Abruzzo
eattheworldnyc.com
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MÉXICO 🇲🇽
Dispatch from Sunset Park, Brooklyn:
So far in Sunset Park, you can buy Mexican antojitos in many mom and pop restaurants, ubiquitous corner stalls and food trucks, in a rising number of back of grocery kitchens, and even a laundromat. The latest entry is this taco stand that sets up shop in a gas station near the Brooklyn Army Terminal. The team also has a tlacoyos cart in the area we've written about a while back and a new truck that they send daily to Ridgewood, Queens.
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📍 Tacos Carmelita Parientes, 5701 2nd Avenue (inside Gulf), Sunset Park, Brooklyn.
ℹ️ The full story today on our website.
Tacos Carmelita Parientes
Tacos Carmelita Parientes
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LAOS 🇱🇦
Dispatch from Williamsburg, Brooklyn:
With so few Lao people in New York City and the eastern seaboard, the best chance to get some sense of what Lao cuisine is all about is to visit some of the most traditional Isan restaurants in the city. The northeastern province of Thailand has much in common with Laos and in fact is populated by more Lao people than the whole of Laos. Their languages are from the same family, and many of the spicy dishes go back and forth over the border.
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But if you visit Laos, you will notice many differences as well, and many dishes that are never a part of the menus of Isan restaurants. Luckily we have a new chef who has been popping up here and there to serve traditional Lao food, and most recently was found in the North 3rd Street Market in Williamsburg.
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The full kitchen at the Williamsburg market has allowed the chef to expand his operation and the menu has followed suit.
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📍 I Eat Lao Food, Pop-up/Various Locations.
ℹ️ The full story today on our website.
I Eat Lao Food
I Eat Lao Food
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