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Environmental Health Services, Inc.
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Looking to rid our area of raccoons. My daughter has seen two climb onto our roof. This had been noticed for about three weeks. Looking for an estimate on this type of job. EHS would be happy to assess and assist to humanely remove and exclude animals from inside of any structure. If these animals are not in the structure, we can possibly offer an anti climbing service but we DO NOT trap and euthanize wildlife when they are just living and surviving in an outdoor environment. Contact EHS Pest with any questions.
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Looking to rid our area of raccoons. My daughter has seen two climb onto our roof. This had been noticed for about three weeks. Looking for an estimate on this type of job.

EHS would be happy to assess and assist to humanely remove and exclude animals from inside of any structure.
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We often think of October as the end of M&T season, think again. Last year I had mosquitoes much later and ticks well into November in my yard. Humans often encounter ticks (especially tiny nymphs) during leaf cleanup. From Dr. Matt Frye: In one week, mosquito eggs laid in a puddle, flower pot, bird feeder, kids toy or tarp can grow into biting adult mosquitoes. Where are mosquitoes breeding in your yard?
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We often think of October as the end of M&T season, think again.

Last year I had mosquitoes much later and ticks well into November in my yard.

Humans often encounter ticks (especially tiny nymphs) during leaf cleanup.

From Dr. Matt Frye:

In one week, mosquito eggs laid in a puddle, flower pot, bird feeder, kids toy or tarp can grow into biting adult mosquitoes. Where are mosquitoes breeding in your yard?
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Some unexpected visitors have overstayed their welcome at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport: rats. KIRO 7 reported Thursday that over 120 active construction projects at the air hub are effectively “pushing” the rodents inside, an issue only escalated by the amount of trash left by SeaTac travelers. A SeaTac rep told the outlet that the airport and restaurant vendors are working their hardest to keep the critters away. “A lot of the food spaces are doing some new deep cleans in their spaces, some of the spaces that are in and around construction, they’ve gotta make sure they have holes sealed up that wildlife may end up getting into,” SeaTac spokesman Perry Cooper told the outlet. Additional measures include a $449,000 investment into the airport’s pest control program, adding more rat traps, finishing improvements on the ceiling structure, and hiring four new employees to respond to related issues, KIRO 7 reports. Health inspections have been making weekly visits to the air hub, too. In the meantime, no airport restaurants have been forced to close due to the infestation. “Our Environmental Health team is aware of the rat issue in the central terminal, and they are providing technical assistance to the facilities to help them address the problem,” the Public Health of Seattle & King County told KIRO 7 of the matter. “So far, nothing we've seen has risen to the level of an imminent health threat, and they are making progress on correcting the issue.”
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Some unexpected visitors have overstayed their welcome at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport: rats. KIRO 7 reported Thursday that over 120 active construction projects at the air hub are effectively “pushing” the rodents inside, an issue only escalated by the amount of trash left by SeaTac travelers.
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Street rats are one of the most universally despised creatures on the planet. Thinking about them makes many people’s skin crawl, and subway riders scream just being in their presence.
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Great summer memories don't have to include red blisters or inflamed patches on your body caused by bed bugs. Bed bug bite marks can take 4 weeks to 6 months to vanish! If you have upcoming travel, remember that bedbugs can travel too. Bed bug infestations often result from travel. Hotels, motels, bed and breakfasts and cottages can have hidden bed bug problems. Bed bugs tend to latch onto clothing, accessories and luggage. This means they can travel home with you and move from the hotel or cottage to your bedroom. Here are ways to prevent bed bug infestations at home after your vacation. * Inspect seams and edges of hotel mattresses before placing your things on top of it. * Avoid using hotel drawers and cabinets if possible. * Keep your things off carpeted floors. Bedbugs tend to stick and hide in thick furry materials. * Isolate and wash all textiles and luggage that was taken on vacation as soon as you reach home. Treat all clothes and accessories that you use with hot water. If you already have had bedbugs make themselves at home in your home, contact EHS Pest. Professional bedbug inspection and treatment can totally eradicate this pest.
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Great summer memories don't have to include red blisters or inflamed patches on your body caused by bed bugs. Bed bug bite marks can take 4 weeks to 6 months to vanish! If you have upcoming travel, remember that bedbugs can travel too.
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Venomous black widow spiders now range farther north than scientists expected, into an area including the most-inhabited parts of Canada. And there's good reason to suggest that warming temperatures are driving the fatal biters north. That's one conclusion of a new study, published online Wednesday (Aug. 8) in the journal PLOS One. The researchers in this study were trying to identify the geographical ranges of animals using citizen science and other spotty data sources. They focused on two spider species: the northern black widow (Latrodectus variolus) and the black purse-web spider (Sphodros niger). The scientists found that data taken between 1990 and 2016 showed a black widow range extending 58 miles (94 kilometers) farther north than the northernmost observation from the period between 1960 and 1989. They suggested that black widows might already range another 30 miles (50 km) north to the Montreal area, though none have yet been reported in that region. [Creepy, Crawly & Incredible: Photos of Spiders] The team could not conclusively demonstrate that climate change has pushed the spiders north. But a number of their findings strongly suggest that's the case, the wrote: * Reports from 1990 to 2016 suggest a much more northerly black widow range than reports from 1960 to 1989. * Since 2012, individual black widows have started turning up in regions of the Canadian provinces of Ontario and southern Quebec where they'd never before been reported. * Across all 46 years studied, both spider species were more likely to turn up during warm weather than cold weather. * The period from 1990 to 2016 has also been much warmer than the period from 1960 to 1989, as the Earth has consistently warmed in recent decades. Black widows are particularly able to move into new areas as the world warms, the researchers wrote in the study, because these spiders are "habitat and prey generalist[s]." In other words, the dangerous critters can comfortably live in a whole range of sufficiently warm environments and eat whatever prey happens to already be there. Plus, the researchers noted, black widows tend to lay lots of eggs at once. So, once the first black widow arrives in a new spot, many more will likely soon appear. Black widows might also be more capable of moving north, the researchers wrote, because unlike black purse-web spiders, they're perfectly happy nesting in human dwellings — which can allow them to ride out cold winters. The researchers noted that even in areas where black widows are present, the odds of getting bitten by one are low. But a black widow bite is sufficiently dangerous, they wrote, that the threat is worth taking seriously. For that reason, they called for a focused citizen-science project to track the creatures and document their potential northern migration. Black widows make particularly good candidates for data from citizen researchers, the study's authors wrote, because the bulbous, inky females with red spots on their bellies are so readily identifiable and unusual-looking. To learn more about spiders and how to get rid of them safe, contact EHS Pest. Originally published on Live Science.
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