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Dustin Wyatt
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Lived in Desloge, MO
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Dustin Wyatt

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HBO is making a Foundation TV series. 
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Cryonics

This is pretty interesting stuff.  It will be exciting to see any replication attempts.

Persistence of Long-Term Memory in Vitrified and Revived C. elegans

Abstract follows with some paragraph breaks because abstracts are always so dense!

Can memory be retained after cryopreservation? Our research has attempted to answer this long-standing question by using the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), a well-known model organism for biological research that has generated revolutionary findings but has not been tested for memory retention after cryopreservation.

Our study’s goal was to test C. elegans’ memory recall after vitrification and reviving. Using a method of sensory imprinting in the young C. elegans we established that learning acquired through olfactory cues shapes the animal’s behavior and the learning is retained at the adult stage after vitrification.

Our research method included olfactory imprinting with the chemical benzaldehyde (C6H5CHO) for phase-sense olfactory imprinting at the L1 stage, the fast cooling SafeSpeed method for vitrification at the L2 stage, reviving, and a chemotaxis assay for testing memory retention of learning at the adult stage. Our results in testing memory retention after cryopreservation show that the mechanisms that regulate the odorant imprinting (a form of long-term memory) in C. elegans have not been modified by the process of vitrification or by slow freezing.

Also, this journal does not seem to get along with Google+'s scraping of links as seen in the below error message.  

#cryonics  
An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie. This site uses cookies to improve performance. If your browser does not accept cookies, you cannot view this site. Setting Your Browser to Accept Cookies. There are many reasons why a cookie could not be set correctly. Below are the most common reasons ...
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I've noticed a trend that seems new-ish to me in articles on the web:

A list of tweets other people made about the articles subject.

These are dumb.  Stop doing it article writers.  Why the heck should anyone care what a random selection of twitter users had to say about the subject of the article?  

Just stop.
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It gets clicks, which means advertising money.
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The rule that human beings seem to follow is to engage the brain only when all else fails - and usually not even then.

David Hull, Science and Selection: Essays on Biological Evolution and the Philosophy of Science
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Use of brain costs many calories.
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Dustin Wyatt originally shared to Science:
 
Vox has a nice article on how much weight to give different types of health studies.

There are literally thousands of ways to design a study. When a news story suggests, "A new scientific study has found..." or a celebrity doctor begins a sentence with, "Studies show...", you need to ask, "What kind of studies?" Because "studies" are not equally reliable, they all have different limitations, and they should not be acted on in the same manner — or even acted on at all. Here's a quick guide to understanding study design that will help you navigate the often bewildering world of health research.
Today's study is just the latest word and must be interpreted in context of others.
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Useful way to assess what you've read...
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Dustin Wyatt originally shared to Science:
 
Why is short-sightedness on the rise?  Too much time indoors!

After studying more than 4,000 children at Sydney primary and secondary schools for three years, they found that children who spent less time outside were at greater risk of developing myopia.
Short-sightedness is reaching epidemic proportions. Some scientists think they have found a reason why.
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Jetpacks are the future.  (one can hope)
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rocketeer
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Have him in circles
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Dustin Wyatt

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In not-surprising-news-about-religion:

In what may be the largest study ever conducted on changes in Americans’ religious involvement, researchers led by San Diego State University psychology professor Jean M. Twenge found that millennials are the least religious generation of the last six decades, and possibly in the nation’s history.
May 28, 2015 | ScienceBlog.com In what may be the largest study ever conducted on changes in Americans’ religious involvement, researchers led by San Diego State University psychology professor Jean …
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At the bottom of that article reads.."Was this article helpful"
Really.?
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Dustin Wyatt originally shared to Science:
 
This story reminded me of something John Cavil said on Battlestar Gallactica:

I don’t want to be human. I want to see gamma rays, I want to hear X-rays, and I want to smell dark matter. Do you see the absurdity of what I am? I can’t even express these things properly, because I have to — I have to conceptualize complex ideas in this stupid, limiting spoken language, but I know I want to reach out with something other than these prehensile paws, and feel the solar wind of a supernova flowing over me. I’m a machine, and I can know much more, I could experience so much more, but I’m trapped in this absurd body.

From the article:

She’s also a tetrachromat, which means that she has more receptors in her eyes to absorb color. The difference lies in Antico's cones, structures in the eyes that are calibrated to absorb particular wavelengths of light and transmit them to the brain. The average person has three cones, which enables him to see about one million colors. But Antico has four cones, so her eyes are capable of picking up dimensions and nuances of color—an estimated 100 million of them—that the average person cannot. “It’s shocking to me how little color people are seeing,” she said.
A unique genetic mutation and a well-wired brain mean that Concetta Antico is like no other artist on Earth.
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This is one of those moments that if you don't know what others are missing you assume that they are having the same experience as you.
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Dustin Wyatt originally shared to Science:
 
It's not uncommon for me to hear the exhortation to not eat processed foods.  Of course, when pressed on the why, most people delve into pseudoscience or end up admitting they're just parroting something they read.

Well here's some science!

The emulsifiers in question are carboxymethycellulose and polysorbate-80; especially in Europe and North America, they are commonly used in processed foods (mayo, ketchup, numerous sauces, ice cream, gluten-free products, fat-free products and many others) and other common products (toothpaste, detergents etc). The study conducted on mice showed that even in low concentrations, these substances drastically affect the gut bacteria which seems to lead to obesity as well as a number of gut-related problems.
A new study suggests that two very common emulsifiers - chemicals that stabilize foods and stop products like mayo from separating - could increase the risk of obesity and irritable bowel syndrome.
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Thanks, +Chad Neu -- I did miss that! Studies done with mice, suggestive of similar effects in other mammals (including us, of course); especially when combined with statistical observations...
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Like why did you go steal Tesla’s E? Like you’re some sort of fascist army marching across the alphabet, some sort of Sesame Street robber?
He's hellbent on saving humanity from itself, but he also wants to build a roller-coaster at his office.
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...nothing occurs contrary to nature except the impossible, and that never occurs.
Introduction
Owner of a couple small businesses.  Husband and father. Terribly interested in cognitive science, rationality, physics, meta-questions about thinking and scientific progress...basically anything science-y.

I spend much of my time applying critical thinking towards making processes more efficient.

As far as my posts on G+ expect something like 70% science news, 10% tech news, 15% musings about something, and 5% internet memes or funny stuff of some sort.
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I don't know anyone who is less of a braggart than me.
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Desloge, MO
Steaks and BBQ chicken are delicious.
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