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Dustin Mitchell
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Also, making tricks to avoid compiler optims is just a time bomb for when the compiler will be smarter at optimizing.. I think link time optimization should get rid of that explicit bzero.
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On the importance of naming things.  This applies to security vulnerabilities, but also more broadly to projects, software, even ideas.

Back when I could count my servers on my bodily appendages, I named them within some theme (YWLCS servers were named after famous women).  This was fun, but it also helped everyone in the department remember minutae about those systems -- we're wired to remember details associated with proper nouns.  So I knew that Tubman was the primary DNS server, Eleanor was the mail and web server, and that Hypatia's blew a drive last night and she was running in degraded mode, so we were draining sessions from her.  Substitute "svr923" for each of those names and it would have been a lot harder to remember.
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The Web just became a little less awful for me.  No more comments on news stories!!
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Wow I'm going to use this, seriously. Thanks for reporting.
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Some nice insightful reading (click through to the original article for a lot more development in the comments .. and yes, this is G+ -- you can read the comments without losing your mind)
 
MH370  A different point of view. Pulau Langkawi 13,000 runway.

A lot of speculation about MH370. Terrorism, hijack, meteors. I cannot believe the analysis on CNN - almost disturbing. I tend to look for a more simple explanation of this event.
 
Loaded 777 departs midnight from Kuala to Beijing. Hot night. Heavy aircraft.  About an hour out across the gulf towards Vietnam the plane goes dark meaning the transponder goes off and secondary radar tracking goes off. 
 
Two days later we hear of reports that Malaysian military radar (which is a primary radar meaning the plane is being tracked by reflection rather than by transponder interrogation response) has tracked the plane on a southwesterly course back across the Malay Peninsula into the straits of Malacca.
 
When I heard this I immediately brought up Google Earth and I searched for airports in proximity to the track towards southwest.
 
The left turn is the key here. This was a very experienced senior Captain with 18,000 hours. Maybe some of the younger pilots interviewed on CNN didn't pick up on this left turn. We old pilots were always drilled to always know the closest airport of safe harbor while in cruise. Airports behind us, airports abeam us and airports ahead of us. Always in our head. Always. Because if something happens you don't want to be thinking what are you going to do - you already know what you are going to do. Instinctively when I saw that left turn with a direct heading I knew he was heading for an airport. Actually he was taking a direct route to Palau Langkawi a 13,000 foot strip with an approach over water at night with no obstacles. He did not turn back to Kuala  Lampur because he knew he had 8,000 foot ridges to cross. He knew the terrain was friendlier towards Langkawi and also a shorter distance.
 
Take a look on Google Earth at this airport. This pilot did all the right things. He was confronted by some major event onboard that made him make that immediate turn back to the closest safe airport.
For me the loss of transponders and communications makes perfect sense if a fire. There was most likely a fire or electrical fire. In the case of fire the first response if to pull all the main busses and restore circuits one by one until you have isolated the bad one.


If they pulled the busses the plane indeed would go silent. It was probably a serious event and they simply were occupied with controlling the plane and trying to fight the fire. Aviate, Navigate and lastly communicate. There are two types of fires. Electrical might not be as fast and furious and there might or might not be incapacitating smoke. However there is the possibility given the timeline that perhaps there was an overheat on one of the front landing gear tires and it blew on takeoff and started slowly burning. Yes this happens with underinflated tires. Remember heavy plane, hot night, sea level, long run takeoff. There was a well known accident in Nigeria of a DC8 that had a landing gear fire on takeoff. A tire fire once going would produce horrific incapacitating smoke. Yes, pilots have access to oxygen masks but this is a no no with fire. Most have access to a smoke hood with a filter but this will only last for a few minutes depending on the smoke level. (I used to carry one of my own in a flight bag and I still carry one in my briefcase today when I fly).
 
What I think happened is that they were overcome by smoke and the plane just continued on  the heading probably on George (autopilot) until either fuel exhaustion or fire destroyed the control surfaces and it crashed. I said four days ago you will find it along that route - looking elsewhere was pointless.  
 
This pilot, as I say, was a hero struggling with an impossible situation trying to get that plane to Langkawi. No doubt in my mind. That's the reason for the turn and direct route. A hijack would not have made that deliberate left turn with a direct heading for Langkawi. It would probably have weaved around a bit until the hijackers decided on where they were taking it.
 
Surprisingly none of the reporters , officials, other pilots interviewed have looked at this from the pilot's viewpoint. If something went wrong where would he go? Thanks to Google earth I spotted Langkawi in about 30 seconds, zoomed in and saw how long the runway was and I just instinctively knew this pilot knew this airport. He had probably flown there many times. I guess we will eventually find out when you help me spread this theory on the net and some reporters finally take a look on Google earth and put 2 and 2 together. Also a look at the age and number of cycles on those nose tires might give us a good clue too.   
 
Fire in an aircraft demands one thing - you get the machine on the ground as soon as possible. There are two well remembered experiences in my memory. The AirCanada DC9 which landed I believe in Columbus Ohio in the eighties. That pilot delayed descent and bypassed several airports.   He didn't instinctively know the closest airports. He got it on the ground eventually but lost 30 odd souls.   In the 1998 crash of Swissair DC-10 off Nova Scotia was another example of heroic pilots. They were 15 minutes out of Halifax but the fire simply  overcame them and they had to ditch in the ocean. Just ran out of time. That fire incidentally started when the aircraft was about an hour out of Kennedy. Guess what the transponders and communications were shut off as they pulled the busses.
 

Get on Google Earth and type in Pulau Langkawi  and then look at it in relation to the radar track heading. 2+2=4  That for me is the  simple explanation why it turned and headed  in that direction.

Smart pilot. Just didn't have the time.

 


 
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Wired picked up the article from G+: http://www.wired.com/autopia/2014/03/mh370-electrical-fire/
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Now's your chance to tell me all the stupid stuff I did in my latest brewery build..
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My recommendation for OpenBSD's OpenSSL: build a CI system that tests all of the important combinations of configure options, operating systems, and so on.  Then set up the build code to REFUSE TO COMPILE anywhere else.  If it's not tested, it's broken.
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Check this before posting plz :)
 
There's been a lot of FUD surrounding Mozilla and Eich, our former CEO. Hopefully this FAQ will help to clear some of that up.
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The list of additions and subtractions in the NYS tax forms is hilarious.  There's a specific subtraction for contributions to the Executive Mansion, two for victims of Nazi persecution, and one for organ donors -- but only if they're still alive.
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Yeah Illinois is one of the worst, and I've done a lot of state returns..
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I've not said anything about this so far, because there's a lot being said and I don't think I can really improve the discussion.  But Jessup's spot-on with this post.
 
With regard to the current controversy about +Brendan Eich :

We aren't going to agree politically or philosophically with everyone we work with, nor should any of us expect to, in any company. As long as people "leave it at the door" when they come to work, it shouldn't be any of my business or anyone else's regardless of what position he or she holds in the company.

Above all, we at Mozilla value our diversity and everyone's right to a voice and point of view in the proper forum - let alone the right to make a private donation to legal cause of his or her own choosing. I'm sure many Mozillians donate time/money/energy/their names to diametrically opposed causes - and that's ok.

I do not agree with nor support the cause that Brendan donated to, but I respect and defend his right as a private citizen who works for Mozilla to make that donation without risk of persecution by his employer. This is the freedom that gives all of us the right and ability to fully participate in our government(s) and societies.

#mozilla  
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I think that's similar to the US Olympic team going to Sochi, right?  And I think Mozilla's approach would be similar: some assurances on both sides, and an agreement that didn't address the issue and was otherwise mutually beneficial.  With a government, we might have general language protecting our employees, and a failure to agree on that language might scuttle the agreement.

Mozilla has agreements with Google, Microsoft, Yandex, and a handful of handset manufacturers, despite disagreeing with those companies on issues much closer to the Mozilla mission.  It's a basic tenet of diplomacy: you can't come to an agreement if you refuse to talk to someone on the basis of a disagreement.
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Sunday's project was putting up a storm door. It was a little under 2" too narrow so there is an inch of extra framing involved.
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  • Mozilla Corporation
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  • Zmanda, Inc
    2010 - 2012
I didn't expect a first-rate place, but for the exorbitant price, I expected something decent. Nope, roach motel. Ugly rooms, holes in the wall, cheap industrial construction, staff that didn't even know where the room was. This place is worth maybe $40/night. If you're paying more, you'll be very sorry. There's camping nearby - try that.
Quality: Poor to fairFacilities: Poor to fairService: Good
Public - 11 months ago
reviewed 11 months ago
I've been here a few times. They are very professional, and value my time - I'm always in and out in just a few minutes. Their prices are far lower than I expected, they are clear about what needs to be done and what doesn't, and the work they do is solid.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
When I checked in, this seemed like a basic cheap-room-with-a-bed. The room and furniture are dark, beaten up, old, and mismatched. The building's clearly not seen the love it deserves. There are a few roaches, but only small ones. The wifi works, but only barely. You'll need to go to one of the local coffeeshops to actually do anything, after you spend 20 minutes finding them on the hotel wifi. There's no free breakfast here. In the final analysis, even the relatively cheap price is too high for the really low quality.
• • •
Quality: Poor to fairFacilities: Poor to fairService: Poor to fair
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
We've been to a lot of Indian restaurants - from the like-momma-makes it holes in the wall on Devon in Chicago to upscale white-tablecloth places. This place falls in the middle: nice, classy atmosphere, well-crafted food, but no need to dress up or wonder whether you'll be sneered at out for eating a samosa with your fingers. We visited around 7pm on a Friday. We got right in, but by the time we left there was a bit of a line. They do take reservations, though. The restaurant has a wide range of cuisines from the subcontinent, and the two we had were delicious and substantial (we brought leftovers home). While they were slammed, the servers kept up remarkably well, but not perfectly. Prices were reasonable for the quantity. Their beer, wine, and spirits list is impressive for the genre, and also reasonably priced.
• • •
Food: ExcellentDecor: Very goodService: Very good
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
9 reviews
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This is a busy multi-doctor office with long hours. They're all good vets, and if you have an emergency or need to be seen quickly, this is a good place to take your pet. However, as a long-term care or a chronic condition, I'd advise against. Their diagnostics must be read out to you by a doctor. They'd prefer that the doctor requesting the test do the reading, but most doctors aren't in very often. And when they are in, calling patients with results is not a very high priority. It can be very frustrating to have an expensive test performed to figure out why your pet is sick, then wait several days, while your pet suffers, to hear what the tests showed. The front desk seems always understaffed, and you can spend quite a while being ignored by staff. I overheard a few near-misses with confusion between patients, and had a difficult time myself making clear how my pet was to be treated. That said, I was pleased to see they had a collar with instructions on my pet when I dropped him off - simple, failsafe procedures are how you prevent mistakes. The lobby smells strongly of stressed-out animals, but the exam rooms were clean and the veterinary procedures I could see were carried out with appropriate techniques. Overall, everyone cares and wants to do right by your pet, but the place strikes me as just barely managing to hold it together.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
A nice "local" bar with all sorts of interesting people coming and going. This is a good place to grab a pint (a good draft list!) and a bite, but don't expect to keep to yourself!
Food: GoodDecor: GoodService: Very good
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
This is a great little independent coffeeshop hidden under the 57th street Metra. The coffee is *very* well-done. They have the usual baked goods, and a few panini sandwiches, but aren't a great place to get a meal. There's a bar with barstools out front, and a number of tables with umbrellas. This is a nice quiet corner of Hyde Park from which to watch the world go by while reading Kant or updating your Google reviews.
Food: Very goodDecor: Very goodService: Excellent
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago