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Dustin Mitchell
Works at Mozilla Corporation
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Dustin Mitchell

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I'd love to see that old interlocking machine.. and those relays!
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This is quite well-written, and nicely summarizes my feelings on the abysmal state of the software industry.  It even touches on governments being a major threat to software quality.
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This is parked on the street between me and the local watering hole.  I'm so tempted to stick a #Firefox sticker under the windshield wipers.
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Benoît Allard's profile photoArc Riley's profile photo
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I might have slapped it on as a bumper sticker. Right in the middle under the license plate
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My talk on firewall unit testing was accepted at @lisaconference! See you in Washington DC Nov 8-13. www.usenix.org/lisa15 #lisa15
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Congrats!
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Excellent video for learning the basics of orbital docking. Very cool! 
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I don't know Microsoft's motives, but in the final release of Windows 10 they snuck in a facebook-esque "settings optimization" which undoes choices users might have made -- including the default browser.

Back to their old tricks?
We are calling on Microsoft to “undo” its aggressive move to override user choice on Windows 10 Mozilla exists to bring choice, control and opportunity ...
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I need suggestions for a free email-discussion-list hosting service.  Basically hosted Mailman, or LISTSERV, or whatever.  This is for small groups of people like the officers of a club or a team working on a project.

I've been using freelists, but their UI is terrible, you can't subscribe people directly (even with confirmation), and they don't work with yahoo.
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Dustin Mitchell's profile photoJean-Michel Beuken's profile photo
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arch ! I had not understood ... I end my Trappist (Zundert) and I go to sleep … sorry :-\ 
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Some pictures from my #Mozilla trip to Whistler
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The website I work at is very community-driven. People (community members and employees) were suggesting that we change our logo to the LGBT rainbow in celebration of the big SCOTUS decision today. Our CEO chimed in with this response, and the rainbow went up:

http://meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/297859/can-stack-overflow-and-metas-logos-be-changed-temporarily-to-the-loveoverflow/297871#297871

And the logo looks like... http://stackoverflow.com/
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The perpetrator of yesterday's terrorist strike was captured a few hours ago, and the bodies of the dead have not yet been buried, and already I'm seeing a refrain pop up in news coverage and in people's comments: How do we understand this killer? What made him turn out this way? Was he mentally ill, was he on drugs, was he abused, was he influenced by someone in his life? Were his motivations about politics, religion, personal relationships, psychological? We can't form opinions about why he did this yet; we shouldn't assume that, just because [insert thing here], it was about race.

You might mistake this, at first, for a genuine interest in understanding the motivations that would turn a young man into a terrorist and a mass murderer. But when other kinds of terrorists -- say, Muslims from Afghanistan -- commit atrocities, the very same people who are asking these questions are asking completely different ones: Why are Muslims so violent? What is it in Islam that makes them so prone to hating America, hating Christianity, hating Freedom?

I think that there are two, very important, things going on here. The more basic one is that, when terrorists are from a group you've never met, it's far easier to ascribe their behavior to the whole group; if it's from a group you know, and you know that the average member of that group isn't malicious or bloodthirsty, then people start asking individual questions. 

But the more important one is that the group that this terrorist belonged to was not merely familiar: it's the same group to which most of the people asking the questions belong. Not merely the same broad group -- "Muslims" and "Christians" are groups of over a billion people each, groups far too broad to have any deep commonalities -- but a far narrower group, a group with a common culture. And there's a reason that people don't want to ask "What is it about this group that caused it:" because in this case, there's a real answer.

The picture you see below is of the Confederate flag which the state of South Carolina flies on the grounds of its state house, and has ever since 1962. (That's 1962, not 1862: it was put there in response to the Civil Rights movement, not to the Civil War) Today, all of the state flags in that state are at half mast; only the Confederate flag is flying at full mast.

The state government itself is making explicit its opinion on the matter: while there may be formal mourning for the dead, this is a day when the flag of white supremacy can fly high. When even the government, in its formal and official behavior, condones this, can we really be surprised that terrorists are encouraged? (Terrorists, plural, as this is far from an isolated incident; even setting aside the official and quasi-official acts of governments, the history of terror attacks and even pogroms in this country is utterly terrifying)

Chauncey DeVega asked some excellent questions in his article at Salon (http://goo.gl/3AZWy7); among them,

1. What is radicalizing white men to commit such acts of domestic terrorism and mass shootings? Are Fox News and the right-wing media encouraging violence?

6. When will white leadership step up and stop white right-wing domestic terrorism?

7. Is White American culture pathological? Why is White America so violent?

8. Are there appropriate role models for white men and boys? Could better role models and mentoring help to prevent white men and boys from committing mass shootings and being seduced by right-wing domestic terrorism?

The callout of Fox News in particular is not accidental: they host more hate-filled preachers and advocates of violence, both circuitous and explicit, than Al Jazeera. 

There is a culture which has advocated, permitted, protected, and enshrined terrorists in this country since its founding. Its members and advocates are not apologetic in their actions; they only complain that they might be "called racist," when clearly they aren't, calling someone racist is just a way to shut down their perfectly reasonable conversation and insult them, don't you know?

No: This is bullshit, plain and simple. It is a culture which believes that black and white Americans are not part of the same polity, that they must be kept apart, and that the blacks must be and remain subservient. That robbing or murdering them is permissible, that quiet manipulations of the law to make sure that "the wrong people" don't show up in "our neighborhoods," or take "our money," or otherwise overstep their bounds, are not merely permissible, but the things that we do in order to keep society going. That black faces and bodies are inherently threatening, and so both police and private citizens have good reason to be scared when they see them, so that killing them -- whether they're young men who weren't docile enough at a traffic stop or young children playing in the park -- is at most a tragic, but understandable, mistake.

I have seen this kind of politics before. I watch a terrorist attack on a black church in Charleston, and it gives me the same fear that I get when I see a terrorist attack against a synagogue: the people who come after one group will come after you next.

This rift -- this seeing our country as being built of two distinct polities, with the success of one having nothing to do with the success of the other or of the whole -- is the poison which has been eating at the core of American society for centuries. It is the origin of our most bizarre laws, from weapons laws to drug policies to housing policy, and to all of the things which upon rational examination appear simply perverse. How many of the laws which seem to make no sense make perfect sense if you look at them on the assumption that their real purpose is to enforce racial boundaries? I do not believe that people are stupid: I do not believe that lawmakers pass laws that go against their stated purpose because they can't figure that out. I believe that they pass laws, and that people encourage and demand laws, because consciously or subconsciously, they know what kind of world they will create.

We tend to reserve the word "white supremacy" for only the most extreme organizations, the ones who are far enough out there that even the fiercest "mainstream" advocates of racism can claim no ties to them. But that, ultimately, is bullshit as well. This is what it is, this is the culture which creates, and encourages, and coddles terrorists. And until we have excised this from our country, it will poison us every day.

First and foremost, what we need to do is discuss it. If there's one thing I've seen, it's that discussing race in my posts is the most inflammatory thing I could possibly do: people become upset when I mention it, say I'm "making things about race" or trying to falsely imply that they're racists or something like that. 

When there's something you're afraid to discuss, when there's something that upsets you when it merely comes onto the table: That's the thing you need to talk about. That's the thing that has to come out there, in the open.

We've entered a weird phase in American history where overt statements of racism are forbidden, so instead people go to Byzantine lengths to pretend that that isn't what it is. But that just lets the worm gnaw deeper. Sunshine is what lets us move forward.

And the flag below? So long as people can claim with a straight face that this is "just about heritage," that it isn't somehow a blatant symbol of racism, we know that there is bullshit afloat in our midst.

The flag itself needs to come down; not with ceremony, it simply needs to be taken down, burned, and consigned to the garbage bin.
"The stars and bars promised lynching, police violence against protestors and others. And violence against churches."
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Dustin Mitchell

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I signed up to be a tester, on the promise that the taskwarrior sync actually works, but a day later my phone still has 2.8.2 on it and no sync.  Is there a way to force an update?
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Anatolij Zelenin's profile photoDustin Mitchell's profile photo
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It would be good to put a note in the play-store description that the taskwarrior sync support doesn't work, then.
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So when you hear "Mozart's Requiem Reimagined", do you imagine a minor fourth sustained for over ten minutes?  Neither did I.  Be warned.  My head still hurts.  I would avoid anything composed by the "Sleeping Giant Collective" just to be safe.
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Similar, yeah
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Mozilla, Buildbot, Chicago, Beer
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Buildbot Maintainer, Staff Sysadmin at Mozlila, Homebrewer, etc.
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Coder, Sysadmin, Brewer
Employment
  • Mozilla Corporation
    present
  • Zmanda, Inc
    2010 - 2012
Great food, great staff, well-served great beers
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
I found this place while serving on a jury, and was pleasantly surprised to see it's not your usual sandwich joint. The food is delicious, creative, and from fresh ingredients. The staff are friendly. And the prices aren't bad.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
I've been here a few times. They are very professional, and value my time - I'm always in and out in just a few minutes. Their prices are far lower than I expected, they are clear about what needs to be done and what doesn't, and the work they do is solid.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
13 reviews
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Early check-in is not an uncommon thing to request, yet here the evening before my reservation, first I'm told that the phone number in the email is the wrong number, and then told by the hotel that I will need to call the morning of the reservation (at which point I'll be on a plane), and even then it's a 50/50 chance. Service is what sets great hotels apart from just-ok hotels, and so far Marquis is ranking "just ok".
Public - 10 months ago
reviewed 10 months ago
I didn't expect a first-rate place, but for the exorbitant price, I expected something decent. Nope, roach motel. Ugly rooms, holes in the wall, cheap industrial construction, staff that didn't even know where the room was. This place is worth maybe $40/night. If you're paying more, you'll be very sorry. There's camping nearby - try that.
Quality: Poor - FairFacilities: Poor - FairService: Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
This is a busy multi-doctor office with long hours. They're all good vets, and if you have an emergency or need to be seen quickly, this is a good place to take your pet. However, as a long-term care or a chronic condition, I'd advise against. Their diagnostics must be read out to you by a doctor. They'd prefer that the doctor requesting the test do the reading, but most doctors aren't in very often. And when they are in, calling patients with results is not a very high priority. It can be very frustrating to have an expensive test performed to figure out why your pet is sick, then wait several days, while your pet suffers, to hear what the tests showed. The front desk seems always understaffed, and you can spend quite a while being ignored by staff. I overheard a few near-misses with confusion between patients, and had a difficult time myself making clear how my pet was to be treated. That said, I was pleased to see they had a collar with instructions on my pet when I dropped him off - simple, failsafe procedures are how you prevent mistakes. The lobby smells strongly of stressed-out animals, but the exam rooms were clean and the veterinary procedures I could see were carried out with appropriate techniques. Overall, everyone cares and wants to do right by your pet, but the place strikes me as just barely managing to hold it together.
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Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago