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Dustin La Mont
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Dustin La Mont

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Such a shame that the finished album is so badly mastered. Horrible over-compression to the point that it's completely distorted in most loud passages. 

A remaster would be amazing... (contrary to popular belief, I actually really like this album)

Dustin La Mont

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Here's some badass live two-piece action from a buddy of mine... just one of Alex's many musical projects. 
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A new discovery for me: Justin King. I know this style of two-handed playing (à la, most noteably, +Jon Gomm) is all the rage these days, but few people have surprised me as pleasantly as this guy here. 

Makes me want to keep practicing. 
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Serious foie gras discussion from Serious Eats. 
Worth a read. 
Video or photographic footage of one badly managed farm or even a thousand badly managed farms does not prove that the production of foie gras, as a practice, is necessarily harmful to the health or mental well-being of a duck. Foie gras production should be judged not by the worst farms, but by the best, because those are the ones that I'm going to choose to buy my foie from if at all.
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NEW COMIC: From the English mountaineer GEORGE MALLORY 'Because it's there' http://zenpencils.com/comic/mallory/
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Dustin La Mont

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The Moments Between || Hong Kong Density 

Our fist day shooting in Hong Kong has wrapped up nicely with a awesome upwards perspective on some very colorful and densely populated apartment buildings not too far from downtown. Once it gets dark out and the apartment lights come on, it’s fascinating how much color, texture, and detail there is to capture. I wonder if the people who live here know just how cool this place looks though the lens. 

We were also able to score some awesome DJI Phantom Drone footage before the building manager politely asked us to leave. ;)

Shot (handheld) - Fujifilm X-M1 - 14mm - f/2.8 - ISO 3200 - 1/10th
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Tea drinkers are concerned with what is "fake Puerh" tea and what is "real Puerh" tea, but the question has many facets. Learn to spot fake Puerh, read on.
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ELVES & WYRMS, NATURE & CULTURE
excerpted from Good Magazine

Last month, the mayor of the 2,200-person town of Egilsstaðir in eastern Iceland matter-of-factly announced that his government had verified video proving the existence of the Lagarfljótsormur, the Iceland Worm Monster. A fixture of Icelandic myth since 1345, the Worm is supposedly a 300-foot sea serpent, which thrashes about and slithers up onto the surface from within the glacier-fed Lagarfljót Lake. Some say the Lagarfljótsormur was put there by men, some say it was tied to the bottom by Finns to keep its bloody appetites in check, and some say its lashing and churning portends disaster.

But rather than go the way of most wyrms—into myth, history, and crackpot theories—a casual, possibly coy half-belief in the Lagarfljótsormur and many more magical creatures still persists in Iceland, with modern-day sightings by government officials, entire classrooms of children, and as in the case of the 2012 film that supposedly confirmed the serpent’s existence, men casually observing a roiling river demon over a cup of coffee. The Lagarfljótsormur and its mythic kin now play a significant role in shaping Iceland’s relationship with and preservation of its own culture and the natural world it’s tied to.

Historically, the particularly dense population of trolls, elves, and dragons in Icelandic poetry and legend makes sense from a number of angles. Some myths were warning tales for the children of the first ninth-century settlers, growing up in a harsh, bizarre volcanic landscape. Some were origin stories for natural phenomena or lyrical amusements in a bleak existence. But perhaps most compellingly, some legends were an attempt to imbue the uninhabited island with an unseen and ancient native population, giving the struggling colonists a way to connect with the past and inject a little magic into life on the explosive, godforsaken rock they now found themselves on.          

But belief in these legends—especially Huldufólk, Iceland’s version of elves—has endured well past the point of any historical utility. Part of it is just the entrenched superstition implicit in Icelandic culture, in which the Huldufólk, invisible men who live in stones, are said to have their own cities, economy, and culture, alternately harassing or protecting humans depending on their mood. In Iceland, the Huldufólk play a role in major holidays like New Year’s, Twelfth Night, Midsummer Night, and Christmas.

The persistence of belief (or at least homage to belief) in these creatures shows up when Icelanders don’t throw stones to avoid possibly hitting an elf or when some families leave álfhól, the elven equivalent of a birdhouse, in their gardens. But participation in these legends runs deeper than just tradition, or a small group of devotees. In 1998, a survey found that more than half of Icelanders had some level of belief in elves alone, and in 2007, only 13 percent were willing to definitively state that elves’ existence was impossible.         

Amazingly, it appears that honest belief in local folklore started to rise again in the 1970-80s, possibly as part of a growing sense of environmental and cultural awareness—which may explain why members of the country’s Progressive Party are more likely to believe in elves than most. Believers often become activists, forcing state agencies to officially heed the word of seers and divert roads around “Huldufólk habitats,” or carefully remove elven rock churches to avoid their destruction.

These advocates have even forced companies like Alcoa to consider elves in their site analyses for future projects, helping to preserve nature, culture, and a sense of Icelandic magic against the tide of industry. And in 2013, when elf activists forced a halt to yet another road construction project—this time to protect the “hidden people” of the lava fields—the Icelandic Road and Coastal Administration was forced to prepare a five-page response to media inquiries on their decision to plan around elves.

Iceland is a small island, administration officials explain, and though some of these beliefs may be contrived and many in the government might not share them, officials learn to err on the side of openness to possibility, just in case the serpent grows wrathful or the elves become spiteful and decide to rain rocks on government equipment. Honest and heartfelt, passive and casual, Iceland’s magical beliefs have endured, and in doing so have incidentally become effective stopgaps for cultural and environmental conservation.

Read the full article: magazine.good.is/articles/elves-and-wyrms-in-iceland
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I'm actually the worst procrastinator ever. I don't do much. 
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I'm pretty sure if you gave me any musical instrument in the world, I could make music with it. I'm not saying it'd be good, but y'know.
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