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Doug Burke
Works at Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
11,615 followers|151,434 views
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11,615 people
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Astronomer
Employment
  • Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
    Astronomer, 2001 - present
  • Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii
    Astronomer, 1999 - 2000
  • Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University
    Astronomer, 1997 - 1999
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An astronomer who spends way too much time on the computer.
Introduction
I am an Astronomer working at the Chandra X-ray Center, which is part of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, in Cambridge, MA. Research interests include observational cosmology, galaxy clusters, AstroInformatics and the semantic web.
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Douglas Burke

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For those able to make it to NY city (well, just a tad North), this show is approaching fast (Apr 12/13)
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Just came across this IndieGoGo campaign to digitally scan photographic plates taken of the night sky. This is how Astronomy used to be done, before all these new-fangled camera phones appeared ...
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Astronomy/Astrophysics things to follower over on Twitter II.

The @astrotweeps account follows the trials, tribulations, joys, successes and failures of an Astronomer per week. The inaugral week, which has just started, is Niall Deacon. See the AstroTweeps home page - http://astrotweeps.wordpress.com/ - for more information.
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Christmas rust.
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I think the middle of November, in New England, is not the best time of year to start flowering.
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:) What a beautiful time nonetheless.
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Doug Burke

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Did you ever want to browse a 360 degree view of the Galactic Plane, as observed by the GLIMPSE team using Spitzer? You did? Well, it's your lucky day. For information on the survey and the technology used to provide this view, head on over to http://www.spitzer.caltech.edu/news/1624-ssc2014-02-NASA-s-Spitzer-Telescope-Brings-360-Degree-View-of-Galaxy-to-Our-Fingertips
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Contact +August Muench if you have any questions about this particular data repository.
 
Major Dataverse Release Coming Soon (Goodbye 3.6.x; Hello 4.0!)

Dataverses will now be able to contain other dataverses, allowing for an arbitrary depth of organizing your dataverses into a tree-like hierarchy.

Expect new and improved browse/search features, metadata support of biomedical data, a new d3.js-based data exploration tool, and much more!

http://thedata.org/blog/major-dataverse-release-coming-spring-2014
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A different way to think about, visualize, and even search the Astronomical literature: as a map of the sky.

This combines a bunch of technology and relies on the hard work of several groups to record and categorize the information in the papers. Just think how much easier (and better) this would be with more semantic knowledge encoded in our latex...
 
URL is adsass.org
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Because if you're going to link to the 'The Day The Earth Smiled' image of Saturn and the Earth (and a lot more) by Cassini, you may as well link to the 5MB version. See the CICLOPS team blog at http://ciclops.org/?js=1 and the press release at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/spaceimages/details.php?id=PIA17172 for more information.
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+Craig Smith _its a quasar emitting light faster than C energy; that leaves the event horizon at a very high energy. due to the superhigh-mass-energy-density of such an object.
With theories like that_

Umm.. no, that's not an actual theory.  It's word salad trying to be a hypothesis.  A hypothesis is an as yet unproven conjecture about how things work.  A theory explains why things work the way they do.  For instance, gravity is a theory - because we have a model that explains everything from the behavior of superclusters of galaxies down to why you fall on your butt when you slip on a sidewalk - and exactly how hard you land.  We understand it so well that when spacecraft do Earth flybys for a gravitational boost, it can go by at 15 km/sec, and we worry when it leaves with a velocity that's 2mm/sec off.

"light faster than C energy"??!? As I said - word salad.
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