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Donald “chronos” King
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“Kenworthy explains that support after a diagnosis can help an autistic person learn how to accommodate their differences. Recognizing areas of strain — that maybe those wont’s are indeed cant’s — they can try different methods, such as finding a routine that works. They may also learn to accept, for instance, that maybe both cleaning and cooking are not possible in one day, as each depletes so much energy.

For too many, though, that crucial diagnosis may never come. People who struggle with executive abilities tend to get ignored. The spectrum is labeled through the ability to communicate and socialize; adapting to daily life is not often factored into the diagnostic process. Difficulty with [executive function] is treated as a byproduct of autism, not a defining feature.”
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In which I write about #autism and how the #tech industry fails to accommodate it.
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I wrote a thing about Evolutionary Psychology.
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And here I start tearing into the flesh of the #GoogleManifesto itself. The guy should be embarrassed at how sloppy his memo was.
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I wrote my take on the #GoogleManifesto guy.

TL;DR: his views are both repugnant and wrong, and I agree with his firing, but people misunderstand why he was fired. Namely: big public corporations like Google are fundamentally Lovecraftian entities, and they do not have ideologies — they have profit margins.

I, uh, may have dipped my toes into "complaining about your former employer on the Internet" bad idea territory, but it's ultimately required context.
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“The network approach [to mental illness] has several important implications. For researchers, it suggests that the search for single causes of mental disorders is quixotic. Of course, symptoms have an assortment of social and neurobiological sources, but these sources are highly unlikely to be unique to one condition.

For practising psychiatrists and psychologists the network view implies that symptoms should be taken seriously in their own right and not seen merely as pale manifestations of underlying disease. Treatments should directly target particular symptoms, not a fictitious hidden cause.”
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“Turns out that a good number of “skeptics” are actually committed to the political cause of libertarianism. This is fine in and of itself, since we are all entitled to our political opinions. But it becomes a problem when it is used as a filter to inform your allegedly critical thinking. And it becomes particularly problematic when libertarian skeptics go on a rampage accusing others of ideological bias and calling for their defunding. Self-criticism before other-criticism, people — it’s the virtuous thing to do.

This latest episode does not, unfortunately, surprise me at all. It fits a pattern that has concerned me for years, as someone who has been very active within the movement and who still identifies with its core tenets. When Steven Pinker openly embraces scientism, turning an epistemic vice into a virtue; or when atheists think that their position amounts to anything more than a negative metaphysical stance — and think that being nasty about it is the way forward; or when atheism, skepticism and scientism are confused with each other for ideological purposes; then I get seriously worried about the future of a movement that has so much potential to help keep the light of reason alive in a society that desperately needs it.

The Boghossian and Lindsay hoax falls far short of the goal of demonstrating that gender studies is full of nonsense. But it does expose for all the world to see the problematic condition of the skeptic movement. Someone should try to wrestle it away from the ideologues currently running it, returning it to its core mission of critical analysis, including, and indeed beginning with, self-criticism.”
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