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Don Rideaux-Crenshaw
Works at Optum
Attended New College of Florida
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Don Rideaux-Crenshaw

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Looking for advice.

A few weeks back, I followed some advice from an experienced local beekeeper -- or at least I think I followed the advice.

Anyway, the nectar flow was ramping up and I put a couple supers of undrawn foundation between the top hive body and two full honey supers. I was hoping for honey to harvest so I put a queen excluder between the top hive body and the first super above it.

So the boxes were stacked:

top
super full of honey
super full of honey
empty super
empty super
===>queen excluder<===
brood
brood
brood
bottom

I figured if all went well, I'd harvest two supers and leave two.

The bees don't seem to be passing the excluder. This is a different experience from the same hive last year.

So -- should I remove the excluder and/or should I restack the full and empty supers?

Thanks for any advice anyone can offer.

Take care,
Don
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Hi Don,   You can leave the box stacked as is.  You just have to have an upper entrance/exit is all.  That's your issue.  They're pretty much trapped.  With bees that have nectar they're fat and can't pass through is what I read from the beesource forum. 
Understand that I myself have not put on an excluder and tried different variants of messing around with boxes and excluders.  What works for some not necessarily works across the board in bee keeping.
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Don Rideaux-Crenshaw

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Temp: 81° F Humidity: 76% Dewpoint: 73°F
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Jim Keehr's profile photoDon Rideaux-Crenshaw's profile photo
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+Jim Keehr Not really but I suspect the humidity was keeping them grounded. Nobody was flying.
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Seems like arduino was a gateway drug. It got me into R π. Now I'm jonesing for the hard stuff.
World's smallest Linux server, with Wi-Fi built-in. Building for the Internet of Things doesn't get easier than this!
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Urban beekeeping? It doesn't get much more urban than this.
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It hasn't been a great year for Monarchs in our butterfly garden but this one is loving the Echinacea.
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I've only seen a few monarchs this year. On the plus side, the blue sage and horsemint I planted is attracting bumblebees. They've been a rare sight in recent years, but now I see them three or four at a time.
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Don Rideaux-Crenshaw

Managing Horizontal TBH's  - 
 
We did an inspection on the top bar this weekend and found it was brood and honey from end to end. There has been a lot of bearding outside the hive so we decided to harvest a couple combs. We in the middle of a pretty strong nectar flow so we're anticipating they'll quickly rebuild and still have a winter surplus. The first image is a fully capped comb, the second a "candid" of the hive, and the last is my wife expressing her joy at our first beautiful pound of comb honey.
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Have them in circles
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Don Rideaux-Crenshaw

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I'm likely under 24/7 remote surveillance, why not my bees?
 
Raspberry Pi Weekly Issue #162 - Bees - out now!

Bees are buzzing in an electric hive, refugee children learn code with Pi.

Calculate north with an easy guide, watch the water through the Pi Fish-Eye.

I didn’t think this through when I started to rhyme… somethingsomethingfarming with the Techie Guy… guy? Guyme?

Shhh, it’s Friday. Enjoy the newsletter!
Welcome to Friday. Bees. Bees are our friends, and the team at the Hive Project are doing all they can to help our hard-working friends thrive with an electric beehive. On top of this, the team at The MagPi have produced a brand new Essentials Guide, helping you make the most out of the world of …
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My wife just took this incredible picture!
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Urban Beekeeping  - 
 
It doesn't get much more urban than this.
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Speculative and provocative article.

From the abstract of the source material:

"Here we propose that at least one invertebrate clade, the insects, has a capacity for the most basic aspect of consciousness: subjective experience."

It will be interesting to see what research programs emerge from this speculation and what they tell us.
 
#DYK #Bees just like humans are controlled by their own desires :)
Two separate studies show that while they may be small, bees and other insects are far more smarter than we have given them credit for.
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A somewhat contrarian view for most beekeepers but a lot of truth in this article. I love my girls and the honey they let me take from them but they are really just the poster children for the less glamorous but more essential native pollinators.
The buzz around America's favorite workers grows louder every year. Is it drowning out the real story of our food system?
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I read this with initial scepticism, but it did not take long for that to turn into general agreement with the issue as presented. This is a really good read, both informative and thought provoking. Good Post!
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Don Rideaux-Crenshaw

Urban Beekeeping  - 
 
We did an inspection on the top bar this weekend and found it was brood and honey from end to end. There has been a lot of bearding outside the hive so we decided to harvest a couple combs. We in the middle of a pretty strong nectar flow so we're anticipating they'll quickly rebuild and still have a winter surplus. The first image is a fully capped come, the second a "candid" of the hive, and the last is my wife expressing her joy at our first beautiful pound of comb honey.
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Have them in circles
312 people
Eric Jensen's profile photo
hellen gold's profile photo
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Kristen Brand's profile photo
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John Dee's profile photo
Kevin Bolden's profile photo
wayne flecknoe's profile photo
Sean Nottingham's profile photo
Work
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  • Optum
    Consulting Business Analyst, present
Basic Information
Other names
Don Crenshaw
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If it ain't broken, take it apart.
Education
  • New College of Florida
    Biology, 1971 - 1974
  • Duke University
    Zoology, 1974 - 1980
Keith came on time, understood the problems quickly and fixed them promptly. Can't ask for much better than that.
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