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Don Geronimo
Works at SourceMob
Attended University of Saint Thomas
Lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
87 followers|92,399 views
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Don Geronimo

3DS Games  - 
 
Animal Crossing Stalk Market
Post Current Prices, Please?

Anybody else following the Stalk Market in their games? My current price for Turnips right now is 116 Bells.

If anybody gets a price significantly higher than 105 Bells in their towns, mind if I take a visit and sell?
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Jamie Butterworth's profile photo
 
Mine is also about that price right now.  I have a number of friends in a Facebook community that update each other on this, and I also frequent Reddit.  I'll keep you in the know.  Did you ever add my friend code?  I'm pretty sure I added yours.
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Don Geronimo

3DS Games  - 
 
Oh my goodness. I've been hoping for this to release for a while, here!
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Paul Werner's profile photo
 
Aw man, can't wait
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I'm on right now doing 1-star quests. Feel free to join me if you'd like.

Free Play 2
Lobby 5
Room: G+ Comm
Password: 9632
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Oboro Jack's profile photo
 
I'm game
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How Do You Choose Equipment?
Purely Looks, Purely Stats, Little of Both?

I'm just wondering how people are currently choosing what materials to collect and what equipment to get for their characters. Do a lot of people choose purely on the skills and stats afforded with each weapon, or does a lot of choice go into how your character will look with the equipment on.

Right now, I have a total of three sets of armor and weapons: Jaggi Armor set, 2 Attack Decorations, and a Zurogong Primo for a pure attacking set; Arzuros Armor set, 1 Paralysis Decoration, and a Heavy Bagpipe+ for a defensive set; and a Bnahabra Armor set with a Vicello Nulo for my status set. For tail cutting, I carry around some Great Swords just in case the party doesn't have a dedicated tail cutter.

Frankly, so long as it doesn't interfere with the quest at hand, I'm usually using my status set, even if my current Hunting Horn doesn't have a status inflict (yet), because I think it looks the best; I'm practically out there hunting large monsters down with a cello while wearing a tuxedo.
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Oboro Jack's profile photoDon Geronimo's profile photoMatt Wright's profile photoJeremy Tiberg's profile photo
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for the most part, stats are the big issue. looks still play a part... but stats>looks
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Online Session Tomorrow?
I'm free all day.

I just want to see if there's anybody interested in meeting online to finish up a few quests; I've gone through all the 1-3 Star quests offline, but haven't gotten to do any online quests. Thinking about plowing through at least the HR1 quests and maybe some arena ones.
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Don Geronimo's profile photoOboro Jack's profile photo
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Yeah good times, def gotta do it again. 
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Ohmigawds.
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Don Geronimo

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No-Grief Desktop Application Tiles in Windows 8.1 Across Devices
My quest for Start Screen consistency provided lessons from the school of hard knocks

I recently got a very good deal on a Nokia Lumia 2520 from AT&T when I came in to upgrade my Lumia 920 smartphone to a Lumia 1520. Thanks to the use of OneDrive sync of Windows 8 applications and settings from computer to computer, I was pleasantly surprised to find that I was immediately presented with the almost-exact same start screen that I had on my Surface Pro, and that the majority of my settings transferred over. It was almost like, save for different hardware, I was using the same computer.

I say almost because the first thing I immediately noticed is the total disarray of my Start Screen, thanks to the removal of the desktop tiles I can use on Windows 8.1 Pro, but for obvious reasons can't use on Windows 8.1 RT. I understand the logic for removing applications that can't be used (why 'waste' screen space on useless tiles that do nothing), but the seamless Windows 8 use provided by OneDrive sync from one device to another is ruined when the start screen ends up a garbled mess on another system.

With this problem in hand, I took up the task of fixing this problem for the sake of PC-to-PC consistency.

Turn Off "My start screen tiles and tile layout sync" in Sync Settings

The first obvious solution to the problem is to turn off Start Screen sync from PC settings. From there, I was able to arrange my start screen on my Lumia 2520 back to a semblance of what I had before without interfering with the desktop app tiles I had on my Surface Pro's start screen. It was an excellent solution that created a consistent start screen on both systems (well, sort of), but it wasn't exactly future proof.

Because start screens no longer get synced to OneDrive, the screen provided on each Windows 8.1 PC is going to be different until it is made the same. In addition, if a live tile that can work on all systems is added in one PC, you'll need to add the live tile to each system manually if you want it to appear in all PCs. Not only does it ruin the effect of a personalized and hardware-independent Windows experience, but, because I'm a rather lazy person, it forces me to make the same changes to all PCs I use, instead of making a change in one and having the change pushed to the others.

Remove All Desktop Application Tiles from the Start Screen

After realizing that manually changing each start screen for each device was far too much work than I wanted to do, the next solution I tried was to only use Modern Apps and Live Tiles on my start screen, with start screen sync re-enabled. I got the consistent start screen effect that I wanted across all my PCs after that. However, my workflow does depend on some Desktop applications when I'm on a Windows 8.1 Pro machine, and losing the easy access provided by a Desktop Tile added a few seconds more than I wanted whenever I did want to use a Desktop app.

It kind of felt like Desktop applications, when they're not on the Start Screen for me, were not considered important enough tools to warrant start screen space; and it also felt like I had to reach into a metaphorical mish-mashed bucket of tools that I can't put in their proper place, much as I wanted to.

Create Groups With Only Desktop Application Tiles

My Start Screen workflow is arranged into these groups: Main, Media, Social, Work, and Shopping. After using only Modern apps and tiles, and feeling like that solution was unsatisfactory, I created more groups that only contained Desktop Application tiles. Now, my Start Screen was arranged as so: Main, Media, Media (Only on 8 Pro), Social, Work, Work (Only on 8 Pro), and Shopping.

This kept the original group layouts consistent between PCs; Windows RT systems simply hid the groups that only show on 8.1 Pro. It was better than just using Modern apps, but still wasn't satisfactory to me. For me, all thing needed for work, for example, should be grouped in the same group, for the sake of knowing that all the tools you would need for a particular context should be grouped together. Sure, having duplicate groups alongside each other was kinda like having all the tools in the same group, but it was a big kinda that I still felt unsatisfied with.

Group Live Tiles and Desktop Applications by Context, but Keep Desktop Tiles in the Rightmost (or Leftmost) of the Group

What I finally decided to do was to bring back my original tile groupings of Main, Media, Social, Work, and Shopping, without the separate groups that only contained Desktop Applications. Starting from left to right, I arranged the Modern Apps and Live Tiles the way I wanted, then appended the Desktop Applications to the end of the group. The screenshot I posted shows how I arranged my work tools in that fashion.

This was an ideal arrangement for me, because it created context-logical groups without the redundancy of two groups. Because the Desktop Applications were appended to the end of each group, they gracefully disappeared in the systems that didn't have those applications, or the systems that couldn't support those applications. The spatial layout of the tiles didn't change for the Modern apps at all, and the Desktop Application's spatial layout only changed if and only if the application wasn't found or wasn't supported. There's a bit of compromise to this arrangement; you can't "mix" desktop and Modern tiles together without potentially breaking the layout in a jarring fashion, for example. However, the "gentleness" of the tile removal from PCs that don't have the app or can't support it helps reduce the jarring effect of a messed-up layout.

Conclusion

Computer workflow is personal and unique to each PC user, and Windows 8.1 gives users the freedom to worry less about messed-up workflows thanks to OneDrive sync. It's too bad that, by design, desktop applications, despite my attempts to make it less painful when switching PCs, are treated like second-class citizens on the Start Screen. However, hopefully this helps people organize their tiles in a consistent and gracefully-degrading way. If there are other ways, or better ways, to organize tiles to keep contexts and layout, please feel free to share!
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Don Geronimo

User Reviews  - 
 
Style Savvy: Trendsetters
It's a real serious business simulation, honestly!
Platform: 3DS, Features: Online Marketplace, StreetPass, AR

I probably bought Style Savvy: Trendsetters in November, and it's been one of my play-for-a-bit-and-put-down kind of games. It's only now that I realized, after checking my Daily Log on my 3DS, that I've accumulated about 45 hours with the game, and each of my sessions is around 1 hour long. So, clearly this game is worth reviewing—if only because it's been able to keep my attention for that amount of time.

Nota bene though, this game is absolutely girly; absolutely positively and—dare I say—fabulously girly. So girly, in fact, that I mistakenly thought that I could select my gender during the character creation phase. How surprised I was, then, to realize that “Don” was a cute anime-esque girl-doll of me. I immediately changed her name to “Dawne” instead.

The plot of the game is certainly workable, but also quite bizarre. You stumble upon a boutique in a town that apparently eats, sleeps, and thinks fashion and only fashion. The owner of that boutique recognizes your talent, hires you as staff, and eventually gives you the store as she works on other ventures. Eventually, you make a name for yourself with your boutique's selection of clothing that varies by season (real-time seasons and months), and with your skill in the fashion contests that start up in town. Oh, also, when you do things in town for yourself or for other people, you gain happiness, measured in glitter, that goes in a jar. In some form of Nintendo magic, that happiness goes up into the sky and makes the moon change from a New Moon to a Full Moon. During a Full Moon good things happen. Just like real life, eh?

Obviously, with a fashion game, the main draw is dressing up various guys and gals that walk into your store. Sometimes they want a full outfit; sometimes they just want one item. Sometimes they have a very specific style (preppy, gothic, feminine) they ask for; sometimes they're a little more vague, which requires using your own fashion eye to figure out what kinds of things they might like. The game recognition for what kinds of clothing your clients want is particularly simple—especially since there's a search function that filters the clothing you can choose by brands, style, patterns, colors, and the works.

Underneath the glitzy and fabulous clothing and accessories with which to dress up your clients is a fairly fun business simulation. Your store's stock room only has a limited capacity for holding men's and women's fashion items, and consideration has to be made for the current season and also for the clientele you want to attract. The store's interior, music, exterior, and mannequins all influence what kinds of people go to your store. In addition, your interactions with people in town outside your store—yes, you can take cafe breaks, and photo shoots, and saunter around your city's downtown—also influence your clients and visitors. Like in real life, networking and reputation are key variables to the success of a venture, especially if you want your customers to keep coming back.

All this doesn't mean that the game is hard; on my play through it didn't get quite hard until I started to fill up my stock room with clothing that I've never sold, and contests didn't become difficult until I reached the International level. Otherwise the game gives lots of freedom for you to explore town, dress yourself (and customers) up, and simply live the life of a fashionista that owns a boutique in a fashion-obsessed town. If it's not fun because of the challenge, it's fun because of the set-your-own-kind-of-pace type of gameplay.

Other features of the game include an online store where you can sell your outfits to various other players. Players can browse all the online shops, and can even favorite your shop if they'd like. It's a fun diversion to try to keep new outfits coming and be a popular shop with actual humans instead of the AI, but other than extra pocket money for you to use in-game, it's more of a nice-to-have. It certainly can extend the replayability of the game, though, if you're into competing with others when it comes to fashion sense. An AR Photo Shoot function is available to show off your avatar or your various customers in a “real-life” setting, and a Rate Your Style kind of mode is available as well, and works wonderfully as a way to demo the game. StreetPass is used to have other players visit your store, where they will request an outfit theme within a certain budget. The player you passed will be able to actually buy the outfit you made through the Online mode if they want. Cool feature, but not one I use very often; it's like people are ashamed to enable StreetPass on this game, but I'm not quite sure why.

It's buy-worthiness is dependent somewhat on if you like business simulations, but is mostly dependent on how much you like making outfits. There's certainly enough options to suit any kind of taste, and, putting aside that you play as a female, it's pretty guy-friendly too. Best way to figure out if you'd like it or not is to try the demo. For me, though, that was, apparently, 45 hours well spent.
5
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I just wanted to see where everyone is online and offline. I'm on the 5-Star Moga Woods quests, working on hunting a Rathalos, a Barioth, a Volvidon, and a Diablos; while on Tanzia Port quests I still need to beat Lagiacrus to get HR2. I could just beat the Urgent quests to beat Lagiacrus by myself in Tanzia Port Solo, but part of me would rather beat it with people instead.
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Oboro Jack's profile photoJustin Simon's profile photoDon Geronimo's profile photoJamie Butterworth's profile photo
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I'm usually available in the evening, after work. So we'll figure out a time. 
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Don Geronimo

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Education
  • University of Saint Thomas
    Music, Education, Mathematics, 2005 - 2008
  • Chaska High School
    High School Diploma, 2001 - 2005
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
A diverse number of skills to accomplish a diverse number of jobs! Let me help you with whatever assistance you need.
Work
Occupation
Cashier, Food/Hospitality; Freelancer, Web Design; Sales and Social Support Specialist
Skills
Customer Service, Food & Beverage, Hospitality, Barista, Restaurant Management, Inventory Management, Sales, Microsoft Office, XAML, C#, HTML5, JavaScript, Visual Studio, PHP, SQL, SVG, ePub, Windows, Mac OS X, Linux
Employment
  • SourceMob
    Sales and Social Support Specialist, 2015 - present
  • the well-travelled guru
    Sherpa/Tech Support, 2011 - present
  • Smashburger
    Shift Leader, 2011 - 2015
  • GameStop
    Game Advisor, 2011 - 2012
  • Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory
    Sales Associate, 2009 - 2011
  • Rockey Grounds Espresso Bar
    Barista, 2008 - 2010
  • University of Saint Thomas: Children's Choral Camp
    Choral Camp Counselor, 2008 - 2008
  • University of Saint Thomas: REAL Project/Summer Academy
    Summer Academy Tutor, 2006 - 2006
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
Previously
Saint Paul, Minnesota, United States - Chaska, Minnesota, United States - Joliet, Illinois, United States - Manila, Philippines
Links
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