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Dolores Black
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I am a writer working on my first fantasy novel. I am also a physician, a homeschooling mother, a blogger, and a wife.
I am a writer working on my first fantasy novel. I am also a physician, a homeschooling mother, a blogger, and a wife.

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I am currently revising Chapter 4 of my first to be published book. I have read it more than three times, but for some reason, I am glued to it. My goal is to finish this revision in a month or less. Today, I will finish it. actually saying this so I really do it by the end of today Then, I can go on with the rest of the story. #amwriting #writerproblems #positivethinking
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Valuable information on #editing.
After I finished my first draft, I was tempted to just get in there and send typos flying. Instead, I decided to take a step back. Here are some ideas on how to evaluate a scene during your first pass. (The link below has more explanation.)

- What's the purpose of this scene? 
- How can you make this a multipurpose scene (that provides character development and worldbuilding, for example)?
- List what goals, motivations, and conflicts exist in this scene for each character
- Would the story hurt if this scene were removed? 
- Check plot points for POV protags to be sure they're big
- Does this scene provide character backstory, while avoiding infodumps? 
- Does the reader have the info necessary to understand the crises in this and upcoming scenes? 
- Does the reader understand the characters enough to appreciate the emotional payoffs (even if they don't empathize)? 
- Whose POV and is it right for this scene? (How would the scene be different from a different POV?)
- Watch out for consistency of science fictional or fantasy terminology from scene to scene (more on this in the second pass)
- Were the characters' reactions believable? 
- Were these the most reasonable reactions? (If not, are they understandable given the situation?)
- Why didn't the characters react differently? (look out for plot holes!)
- Is it possible to increase the tension of this scene?
- Are the stakes and urgency higher than in previous scenes? (Watch pacing)
- Is the pacing slow in any spots? 
- Are more obstacles needed? Was something resolved too quickly? 
- Is there tension on every page?
- Does the scene end with a question, hook, or cliffhanger? (Some scenes should end in cliffhangers to propel the reader forward, but it's best if not all of them do.)
- Does this scene move the story forward in an exciting and meaningful way, while avoiding feeling artificial? 
- Avoid talking heads or white rooms, and balance actions, thoughts, settings, etc. that help move the story forward
- Does the scene itself have an arc? 

#writingtips   #writingadvice  
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This is a great post! The process of #writing requires a lot of patience.
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Great advice for #writers!
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This is another #doodle inspired by one of my characters. This is a dryad.
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For everyone who loves books.
The Booklovers' 10 Commandments

I found this excellent Infographic over at Quoth the Wordsmith’s blog and just had to share. Enjoy, and many thanks to Quoth for this hilarious resource! 

#selfpublishing   #writingtips   #nicholasrossis  
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Here's a little source of inspiration - this infographic contains a variety of mythical creatures from all over the globe, sorted by location: http://bit.ly/1uYo9r8
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Be dangerous!
A friend and fellow writer shared this on Facebook today, and besides the fact that it's Madeline L'Engle and I always like what she has to say, I thought it was a good day for it.

"The first people a dictator puts in jail after a coup are the writers, the teachers, the librarians — because these people are dangerous. They have enough vocabulary to recognize injustice and to speak out loudly about it. Let us have the courage to go on being dangerous people.... let us look for beauty and grace, for love and friendship, for that which is creative and birth-giving and soul-stretching. Let us dare to laugh at ourselves, healthy, affirmative laughter. Only when we take ourselves lightly can we take ourselves seriously, so that we are given the courage to say, “Yes! I dare disturb the universe.” - Madeleine L'Engle
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