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Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc.
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Our mission is to keep Dobermans in their homes and to prevent them from being euthanized due to a change in owner circumstances.
Our mission is to keep Dobermans in their homes and to prevent them from being euthanized due to a change in owner circumstances.

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“Aoife” (pronounced ee-FA)

Aoife is a very special Doberman, in that she is a working service dog. She helps her human mom, Matilda, on a daily basis, so it is important that she be able to perform her job. A great deal of specialized training goes into preparing a service dog to perform duties specifically designed to help someone maintain an independent lifestyle, so any impediment to that performance impacts the owner of the dog pretty significantly.
At almost four years old, Aoife is in her prime. She tore the cruciate ligament in her right rear leg in February of this year, and has been restricted in her activities since that time. DIP is going to help fund TPLO (Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy) surgery for Aoife to repair her torn cruciate ligament, after which she will have several weeks of rehabilitation. Once she completes that, we expect her to resume her very important duties as Matilda’s service dog. Check out Aoife’s photos on Facebook. We’ll keep her page updated with progress reports.
If you can help with a donation for Aoife or any of our other cases, please go to our webpage at www.dobermansinapinsch.org/donate. You can donate there via PayPal, or you can send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658.
Thank you for supporting Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., where “We help Dobermans stay in their homes with the people who love them.”
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2016-05-22
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“Shadow”
Shadow’s human parents, Oscar and Ariana, contacted us about helping with veterinary expenses related to diagnosing exactly what had caused this winsome five-year-old DoberBoy to stop eating. They were concerned because Shadow had consumed part of a toy – a common problem with many Dobermans. We encouraged them to get Shadow to the vet immediately, which they did, and Shadow’s veterinarian, Dr. Bruce Lewis, began a series of supportive treatments and diagnostic procedures.
Dr. Lewis and the team at Grand Montecito Animal Hospital put Shadow on IV fluids and did a series of barium x-rays in order to determine first, if there was actually a portion of a toy in the intestines, and second, the exact location of it. Knowing the location of a foreign object in a dog’s intestines helps a veterinarian determine the probability of the object passing; objects that don’t pass can cut off blood supply to the area of the intestines where the object is lodged, requiring surgery to remove the object and sometimes a portion of the intestines.
Shadow’s barium x-rays indicated that any foreign object he might have ingested had passed through the stomach, leaving him with a case of ulcerative gastroenteritis. Dr. Lewis felt the condition was treatable, though it would require Shadow to remain hospitalized for another four days. During this time, Shadow’s condition deteriorated and he began to show signs of liver failure; Dr. Lewis recommended exploratory surgery to identify the cause of this. Shadow’s owners, of course, wanted to know what was going on with this young Doberman, so they proceeded with the surgery.
Once he was able to see Shadow’s intestines and organs, Dr. Lewis determined that there was damage to the liver, the spleen, and the pancreas; in addition, he could find no pulse to the intestines, indicating substantial, probably irreversible, damage. Shadow’s family opted to euthanize him at that point rather than wake him from surgery to say goodbye, as there was no possibility for him to recover from this level of organ damage.
Our hearts go out to Oscar and Ariana; Shadow was a big source of joy in their lives and we know how much they are going to miss him. Our sincere appreciation to the veterinary team, especially Dr. Lewis, at Grand Montecito Animal Hospital. Without the support of the wonderful veterinarians we work with in our organization, we would not be able to assist Doberman owners the way we do.
Shadow’s hospital bill is substantial, much more than DIP can manage on its own. If you can help with a donation for Shadow or any of our other cases, please go to our webpage at www.dobermansinapinsch.org/donate. You can donate there via PayPal, or you can send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658.
Thank you for supporting Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., where “We help Dobermans stay in their homes with the people who love them.”
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2016-05-22
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Sho is heading home.

A message from his mom Talisa: Sho is doing great. I believe he feels better already. Last night he slept curled up, which was the first time in over a month.  We have started the trip back home staying in Kentucky tonight.  I snapped a few pictures of Sho today.
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2015-10-31
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Good news from Sho's mom, Talisa:
10/29/2015
Sho’s Surgery Day
We had a good long ride, Sho slept almost the whole way here only waking when we stopped and to occasionally look out the window. Dr. Durkes has so many people come in from out of town that they referred us to a nice hotel that gives his customers a discount. The receptionist last night said that they have people come from all over, with one or two staying every week for appointments.
I dropped Sho off at his appointment this morning at 8:30. Sho was so nervous he was shaking. They immediately took him back and told me a couple minutes later that they already had him under. He was ready to go at 1:00pm. The doctor took me back to see him and told me he was loopy from the anesthesia. Dr. Durkes informed me that, they get an estimate of the affected areas by the amount of blood that comes out of the neck.
Typically dogs only have one affected area, but Sho’s whole neck was affected and he has most likely has been in pain for some time. He has antibiotics and there is no need for pain medicine because the gold beads will soon start to relieve some of the pain he feels. Sho has a neck wrap on that needs to stay for at least three weeks; dogs that won’t keep it on take longer to heal. I do not believe the neck wrap will be a problem for Sho because he has been wearing one for almost two weeks anyways. His clinical signs should improve over the next week, but the actual healing process takes about six months to a year. I still need to take the same precautions with Sho, such as using a harness and not giving him toys that he would like to shake around.
Sho was able to get up and walk to the car from the clinic. Upon getting to the hotel I picked him up out the car, he leaned over and I laid him down on the ground. His eyes were huge and cross eyed. I called Dr. Durkes and he said that he is not sure why but some dogs have a hard time recovering from the anesthesia, and he needs to sleep it off today and possibly tomorrow. The wonderful hotel staff helped me roll him upstairs in a luggage cart, which they say happens often.
I asked the doctor if Sho should be able to live a normal life and life span and he said yes, and that they have been very successful with Dobermans. I am so thankful that Sho has a second chance at living a happy life. Even though Sho is so drowsy, he still insists on lying in the middle of the floor to be close to everyone. Sho also got neutured and his nails clipped (although they are still too long, but I will work on that). I cannot express how grateful I am to have this opportunity to take him for treatment. I am sure if I had not done anything I would most likely have to have put him down sometime soon. I will keep you updated, there is no need for a follow up visit with a vet, and I just need to give Dr. Durkes a call in three weeks. When I get back I will scan a better copy of the bill. I have also attached some pictures taken of Sho today.
Thank you to all our donors for making success stories like this possible!
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2015-10-31
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Sho is heading to get his surgery. Here is a message from his mom Talisa: Just dropped Sho off.  He was so nervous, but they put him under quick.  I will be back to get him around 1 pm. Pic is Sho last night when we got in the hotel. If you would like to contribute to Dobermans In Pinsch to help pay for cases like Sho Please visit http://dobermansinapinsch.org/donate.
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2015-10-31
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“Sho”
We thought this was just the cutest name – “Sho” is short for “Shonuf” – that clever southern expression for “Sure enough,” integrated into a puppy’s name. Sho’s young life has been overshadowed by falls and a lack of coordination between his rear and his front legs. He’s never been able to even jump into the car on his own; the times he fell down at home and nobody was home to help him up he had to crawl to carpeted surfaces in order to get up. He has remained a true Doberman, stoic and uncomplaining. During his life two babies have been born into the family, and he has accepted them 100%, choosing to be in the midst of their activities.
Throughout his life Sho’s human mom, Talisa, has suspected that something was really wrong with him beyond puppy clumsiness. She has taken him to the vet more than once only to have him pronounced fine. While this went against her intuition she did her best to believe he was, in fact, “fine.” Recently, though, it became clear Sho was suffering from something undiagnosed. Talisa took him to a neurologist who diagnosed that Sho has wobbler’s, a condition known to affect Dobermans at higher rates than other breeds. It involves compression and/or rupture of one or more discs in the neck or back, and causes symptoms from clumsiness to total paralysis.
Talisa contacted us, told us Sho’s story, and kind of stole our hearts. She’s motivated, dedicated, and in this for the duration. She loves this dog and wants to do all that she can for him; we want to help her do that. We asked around of our friends in the Doberman community and got information about gold bead implants, along with a referral to one of the top veterinarians who does the procedure. Sho’s situation right now is more hopeful than it’s been for some time; it appears that Talisa is going to be able to take Sho to this veterinarian for a hands-on evaluation in the next week or so. We are hopeful that he will be deemed a candidate for the surgery and that it will help stabilize him and give him many good years with his family.
It will be expensive; more than DIP can fund by itself. If you can help with a donation, please go to our webpage at www.dobermansinapinsch.org and click on the “donate” button. You can donate there via PayPal, or you can send a check to us at Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., P.O. Box 8232, Newport Beach, CA 92658. And check out his photos on Facebook. We’ll keep his page updated with progress reports.
We want to extend a special thank you to fellow Doberman owner, friend, and all-around good egg, Christy Waehner,  whose own experience with this condition years ago led her to set up an informational site at www.syllysylvia.com. Christy lives in Talisa’s area and the moment we put out the call for help she volunteered to help Talisa locate the resources to help Sho. 
Thank you for supporting Dobermans In A Pinsch, Inc., where “We help Dobermans stay in their homes with the people who love them.”
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2015-10-31
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Meet Sho Rolon one of our newest cases
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2015-10-31
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