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Dirk Puehl
Lives in Frankfurt am Main
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Dirk Puehl

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#onthisday in 1798, during the climax of the Battle of the Nile, the French admiral François-Paul Brueys d'Aigalliers, Comte de Brueys, died aboard his exploding flagship “L’Orient”.

“The boy stood on the burning deck.” Felicia Hemans' rather silly poem “Casabianca” is arguably the best-remembered piece about the consequential Battle of the Nile that left Napoleon’s Armée d'Orient marooned in Egypt and ended his dream of becoming a second Alexander the Great and conquering India with a bang. The bang, or more precisely, the explosion of the French flagship “L’Orient”, one of the largest and most powerful ships-of-the-line of the Age of Sail at the climax of the engagement, was indeed heard for decades to come, reverberated in silly poems, songs, dozens of spectacular seascapes and Nelsonian legend. But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/08/if-in-this-disastrous-event-he-made.html

Depicted below is Thomas Luny’s “Battle Of The Nile August 1st 1798 At 10pm“ (1834), capturing the  dramatic end of “’L’Orient”.

#ageofsail #europeanhistory #history #napoleonicwars #navalhistory
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Thanks, John.
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Dirk Puehl

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#onthisday in 1919, the English Academic painter and President of the Royal Academy Sir Edward Poynter died in London at the age of 83.

When Sir Edward Poynter became President of the Royal Academy in 1896, there was not even a Swan Song sung of High Victorian Art, he just oversaw the creation of artworks painted a generation too late like those highlights of his fellow mourners Dicksee and Waterhouse. Poynter carried the latter to his grave in 1917 and died two years later in a world that was completely turned upside down. Once, though, Poynter, along with other leading Academic artists, was the mouthpiece of the self-conception of an epoch and its demands on myths and legends. Read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/07/faithful-unto-death-dying-world-and.html

Depicted below is Sir Edward Poynter “Israel in Egypt” (1867), giving "… every evidence of having fully profited by recent Egyptological research ... a typical example of the successful application of the modern principle of wedding archaeology to art" as the London Illustrated News put it in 1867.

 #art #arthistory #culturalhistory #europeanart #victoriana #victorianage
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:-)
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#onthisday , on 22 – 23 July 1805, 210 years ago, the provisional highlight of the Trafalgar Campaign was fought between a squadron of Admiral Robert Calder’s 15 British and Villeneuve’s 20 Franco-Spanish ships-of-the-line during the indecisive Battle of Cape Finisterre. 


"Let us be masters of the Channel for six hours and we are masters of the world." Napoleon said after having assembled 150,000 men and thousands of landing crafts on the French Atlantic Coast to invade England and besides some rather hare-brained schemes about how to cross over, it was the job of the French Navy and their new Spanish to at least draw the British blockading squadrons out of the Channel. Admiral Villeneuve did his best to get chased back and forth across the Atlantic by Nelson’s Mediterranean Squadron back and forth across the Atlantic during what was later known as the Trafalgar Campaign and promptly ran into Calder’s ships off Galicia. But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/07/a-provisional-highlight-of-trafalgar.html

Depicted below is the Scottish marine painter William Anderson’s (1757–1837) imagination of “Admiral Sir Robert Calder's Action off Cape Finisterre, 23 July 1805“

#ageofsail #europeanhistory   #history , #militaryhistory   #napoleonicwars
22 July 1805, the provisional highlight of the Trafalgar Campaign was fought between a squadron of Admiral Robert Calder’s 15 British and Villeneuve’s 20 Franco-Spanish ships-of-the-line during the indecisive Battle of Cape F...
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:-)
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#onthisday  in 1721, the French painter Jean-Antoine Watteau died at the age of 36 in Nogent-sur-Marne.

Watteau’s sujet was unusually limited for an artist of his calibre, good, clean fun assembled with a touch of irony and to give utterance to this image was his only stroke of genius in this regard. But a quite consequential one. Read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/07/a-chopin-of-painting-antoine-watteau.html

Depicted below is Antoine Watteau’s (quite frugal) “Feast of Love” (1718 – 1719)

 #art #arthistory  #culturalhistory  #europeanart
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Just so :-)
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#onthisday  in 1884, the Italian painter and sculptor Amedeo Modigliani was born in Livorno.

While the –isms of Modernity, Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism and what not along with the Great War exploded around his ears, Modigliani developed a distinctive own style in the short time he had at his disposal before the Prince of Montmartre died of tuberculosis and having lived an artist’s live that, by rights, belonged into the days of Baudelaire, Verlaine and the fin de siècle. Read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/07/ne-tattardes-pas-avec-lavante-garde.html

Depicted below is one of Reclining Nudes from 1917, now at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

#art  #arthistory  #culturalhistory  #europeanart
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My thoughts precisely :-)
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#onthisday   in 1827, the French privateering naval hero and slave trader Robert Surcouf died at the age of 53 in his native Saint-Malo in Brittany.

Few corsairs were celebrated as national heroes and Robert Surcof certainly ranks with Sir Francis Drake in this regard along with the legends told about him to this day, even though the memory of Surcouf is a bit blemished by his parallel career as slaver. But for more than a decade, he put the fear of God into the British merchant marine and showed the Royal Navy that they did not rule the waves completely. Read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/07/un-celebre-marin-fini-sa-carriere-death.html

Depicted below is Surcouf’s arguably finest hour, the capture of HEICS “Kent” off Calcutta, as remembered and painted by Ambroise-Louis Garneray, painter, writer, Surcouf’s biographer and member of “Confiance’s” crew during the action in 1800 

 #ageofsail #europeanhistory  #history  #napoleonicwars  #navalhistory
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Glad you thin so :-)
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Dirk Puehl

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#onthisday in 101 BCE, the twenty years of the Germanic Cimbri’s meandering through Europe ended with a crushing defeat and obliteration of the tribe at the hands of Gaius Marius and his reformed army in Northern Italy at the Battle of Vercellae.

Three Germanic and Celtic tribes on the march, searching for a new place to settle down, had wandered through Europe from Denmark towards Bavaria, Slovenia and Serbia and then to the west again and inflicted two crushing defeats on the Romans. But a supposed reform of the Roman Army that finally led to the downfall of the Republic proved to be their end as well, first at Aquae Sextiae, Aix-en-Provence, in October 102 BCE and then on the Raudine Plain in Northern Italy. But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/07/mine-is-victory-marius-mules-and-end-of.html

Depicted below is Francesco Saverio Altamura’s (1822 – 1897) Romantic imagination of “Marius triumphing over the Cimbri” (1859)

#ancienthistory #ancientrome #culturualhistory #europeanhistory #history   #militaryhistory  #romanhistory
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Well, football is hell... what... eh, no...
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#onthisday in 1609, During a three-day hurricane in the West Indies, Admiral Sir George Somers sailed his flagship “Sea Venture”, part of the “Third Relief” bound for Jamestown, Virginia, on the reefs off Bermuda, inspiring Shakespeare’s “Tempest”.

The earlies of Virginia and the wreck of the “Sea Venture” naturally spawned a lot of stories and legends. And while the greatest colonial empire the world had ever seen somehow got out the wrong side of bed with its first attempts to settle in North America, one of the most charming stories of world literature was salvaged from a wreck off Bermuda. But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/07/a-brave-vessel-who-had-no-doubt-some.html

Depicted below is Miranda witnessing the shipwreck in Shakespeare’s “Tempest” as imagined by John William Waterhouse (1849–1917) in 1916

 #americanhistory #europeanhistory #history #literaturehistory, #literaryhistory #literature
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Least I can do and all :-)
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#onthisday  in 1789, the English Romantic painter of apocalyptic visions John Martin was born in Haydon Bridge, Northumberland.

Sights of volcanic eruptions, deluges, burning cities or vast palaces were nothing that happened only in one’s imagination in the late 18th and early 19th century, but it took the mindscape of a Milton or a Blake and a suitably Romantically moved era and surroundings to magnify them to apocalyptic proportions. And this is exactly what John Martin did, becoming an apocalyptic visionary, leading the way for generations of showmen to follow. But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/07/it-is-like-mouth-of-hell-john-martin.html

Depicted below is “Belshazzar's Feast” (1820), John Martin’s most successful painting.

 #art #arthistory  #culturalhistory  #europeanart
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Thank you :-)
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#onthisday in 1410, in Mazovia, 70 miles south of Gdansk and Kaliningrad, the Polish–Lithuanian–Teutonic War climaxed in one of the greatest and consequential engagements of the Middle Ages, the Battle of Grunwald.

In the wake of the Northern Crusades, the Teutonic Knights had established arguably the best organised, most profitable and advanced body politic in Northern Europe, rivalling the Italian City States, admittedly at the expense of the subdued and forcibly baptised local peoples and their neighbours, prominently what was left of the principalities of Kiev and the Rus, the Lithuanian Princes and the King of aspiring Poland. When the latter two formed an alliance, the tables finally turned against the “Krzyżacy“, the Crusaders. Read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/07/piles-of-corpses-piles-of-bodies-and.html

Depicted below is Jan Matjeko’s epic painting “The Battle of Grunwald” from 1878.

#culturalhistory  #europeanhistory  #history  #medievalhistory  #militaryhistory
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Honi soit qui mal y pense :-)
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#onthisday  in1593, the Italian painter and Renaissance virtuoso Giuseppe Arcimboldo, best known for his panel paintings of fruit, vegetable, fish and books composed into allegoric portraits or still lifes, died at the age of 67 in his native Milan. 

Renaissance art is usually full of picture riddles, symbols, scientific curiosity and mythological layers, but few contemporary artists fired a broadside of these elements on the beholders of their works like Arcimboldo. But then, the abundance of art, science and magic at Rudolf II’s court in Prague, a true #wunderkammer, all in all, provided a fruitful background for these wonderful blossoms of Rudolfine Mannerism. Read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/07/from-bohemian-parnassus-and-rudolfine.html

Depicted below is a detail of Arcimboldo’s portrait of Emperor Rudolf II as Vertumnus, the Roman God of the seasons (around 1590)

#art   #arthistory   #europeanart   #culturalhistory  
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Anything else would have rather surprised me, dear Susanne :-)
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Dirk Puehl

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#onthisday  in 1809,  the Battle of Wagram began near Vienna, with 300,000 men involved one of the greatest battles of the age, ending in a costly, hard-won victory for Napoleon on the following day.

Eight weeks after the surprising victory of the Austrian Archduke Charles over Napoleon at Aspern-Esslingen, Napoleon attempted another crossing of the Danube, this time with more success, but the often ridiculed Austrian Imperial Army put up a stiff resistance again near Wagram. But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/07/ground-i-may-recover-time-never-battle.html

Depicted below is Napoleon at Wagram by the leading French authority on “Blood and Thunder” sujets, Horace Vernet (1836)

 #europeanhistory #history  #militaryhistory  #napoelonicwars
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Hmm I can understand +Dirk Puehl​,i am student at collage so I maybe can understand you. I mean Napolyon is a magic hero and I love him .My dear and me love him very much. 
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"I deny nothing, but doubt everything.” Lord Byron
Introduction

About what I do and post here on Mother Google her networks:

Blood and thunder, artsy things, curiosities and lots of ships, everything featured in my little #onthisday-series. I post a daily feature about something that happened “on this day”, weather permitting.

Usually, the posts turn on Literature with a heavy focus on the 19th and early 20th century and silver screen adaptions. The dark and macabre, vampires, ghosts and ghoulies, the plain fantastic, the Byronic tradition in Europe, dandyism as well as Thomas Mann, Dostoevsky and Nietzsche. History, often military history, from antiquity to the dawn of the 20th century and everything an armchair sailor can come up with. Fine arts with pretty much the same foci during the said period as well as Mythology.

And besides that I currently collect curiosities online, often with a touch of #steampunk and exhibit them in my virtual #wunderkammer, an online cabinet of curiosities. 

Speaking of what. I don’t discuss politics on the Internet.

There is a legend from the beginning of the Great War: The German High Command cabled to their allies in Vienna: “The situation is serious but not hopeless!” and some wisecrack in Vienna cabled back: “No. The situation is hopeless but not serious.” That pretty much sums it up. ‘nuff said.

The same is true for religion. Although I am willing to discuss religion from a historical point of view, I am not interested to hear people’s personal persuasions on god(s) or atheism. If you are interested in my opinion – read The Brothers Karamazov.
It’s all in there.
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Pellinore