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Dirk Puehl
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22 July 1456, #onthisday 560 years ago, the Ottoman siege of Belgrade ended with a victory of the Hungarian warlord John Hunyadi and John of Capistrano’s crusaders, commemorated to this day with ringing the noon bells in church.

When the news of Sultan Mehmed’s capture of Constantinople reached the West, a few weeks before the last battle of the Hundred Years’ War was fought at Castillon, the Holy Roman Habsburgs were just about to recover from their devastating conflict against the Hussite heretics in Bohemia and the Borgia popes in Rome along with the powerful Italian city states preferred to be at each others’ throats, panic began to spread. The threat was real enough. With his new capital established in Constantinople, Sultan Mehmed II, already known as Fatih, the Conqueror, prepared for his big push into Central Europe along the Danube. In his way lay the Hungarian fortress city of Nándorfehérvár, Kriechisch Wyssenburg, Belgrade. With an army of 70,000, an artillery park of 300 pieces and a river fleet of 200 vessels at his command, the Conqueror began the siege on July 4, 1456. The Franciscan fire-and-brimstone priest John of Capistrano managed to incite tens of thousands of peasants in southeastern Europe and a couple of Austro-German knights to crusade against the Turks and with a considerable amount of money from the alms bag of Pope Callixtus III for the Hungarian warlord John Hunyadi, they joined forces and prepared to lift the siege against the odds of a numerically superior and far better equipped army.

But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2016/07/bulla-turcorum-john-hunyadi-siege-of.html

Depicted below is "The Battle of Nándorfehérvár", as Belgrade was known in Hungarian, a mid-19th century painting by an unknown Magyar artist, showing John of Capistrano in the centre and John Hunyadi on horseback to the left.

#culturalhistory #europeanhistory #history #medievalhistory #militaryhistory
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Thank you, Trey.And no, Mehmed Fatih wouldn't exactly have won a popularity contest on the Western world back then... Vlad Dracula, however... well, he and John Hunyadi got off the wrong foot somehow, but Vlad later impressed him with his sharp mind and knowledge about Ottoman customs ... and with speaking Turkish quite fluently. He became a member of Hunyadi's staff and was at Belgrade as well.
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10 July 1790, #onthisday during the climax of the Russo-Swedish War, the Battle of Svensksund ended with a nearly complete Swedish victory in one of the largest naval engagements ever fought.

In contrast to the incredibly savage religious wars of the 17th and the national wars of the 19th century about to bloodily dawn on Europe, Cabinet Wars, named after the war cabinet absolute rulers of the age gathered around them in case of conflict, were waged with limited, manageable military goals usually for minor territorial gains and with minor suffering of non combatants. At least in theory. However, enlightened despot Gustav III of Sweden picked arguably the last of these quarrels with his first cousin Catherine the Great of Russia in 1788. His plan to invade near St Petersburg, force her to make concessions and help him to overcome a severe domestic political crisis depended on naval supremacy in the Eastern Baltic Sea and that cunning plan somehow foundered until both powers’ highly specialised coastal fleets met at Svensksund, some 80 miles east of Helsinki.

But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2016/07/forget-war-as-passing-cloud-battle-of.html


Depicted below is Johan Tietrich Schoultz’s (1754 - 1807): "Slaget vid Svensksund" (The Battle of Svensksund, 1791)

#ageofsail #europeanhistory #history #militaryhistory #navalhistory
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The nanny really is a gem, +Mari Christian - don't know what I'd do without her!
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26 June 1876, #onthisday 140 years ago, the Battle of the Little Bighorn or Battle of the Greasy Grass to the Lakota finally ended after the death of Lt Colonel George Armstrong Custer on the previous day and the attacks on Benteen’s and Reno’s position finally ceased with the confederation of Lakota, Cherokee and Arapaho leaving the area.

In the spring of 1876, the US Army was supposed to pin down the hostile Lakota, Cheyenne and Arapaho with a so-called “three-pronged approach”, eradicate any resistance and drive the survivors back to the reservations. The Great Sioux War had begun. And since all US Army commanders involved occupied themselves with how to catch the Injuns, expecting anything but a stiff resistance, the first real contact with the enemy on Rosebud Creek in Montana on 17 June came as a bit of a surprise to General Crook’s northbound column. A more or less equally strong contingent of Lakota and Cheyenne braves under the Oglala war chief Tȟašúŋke Witkó, Crazy Horse, had fought the advance of Crook’s 1,000 army regulars and Crow and Shoshoni allies to a standstill, putting his column out of action. The commanders of the Dakota and Montana column, General Alfred Terry, Colonel Gibbon and Terry’s cavalry leader Lt. Colonel Custer met on 21 June on board of the supply ship “Far West” on the banks of the Yellowstone River and discussed their further proceedings. Custer opted for leaving infantry support beind, along with a battery of Gatling machine guns, and headed his 7th Cavalry straight for the Bighorn River where scouts had located a large Indian encampment. Just how large nobody could say for certain, but Custer was anxious they might still escape him and pressed ahead into the Powder River Country. He was in for a rather nasty surprise.

But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2016/06/day-of-greasy-grass-great-sioux-war-and.html

Depicted below is Charles Marion Russell’s "The Custer Fight" from 1903.

#americanhistory #history #militaryhistory
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I am not sure if we were socialists oddly enough , it's just what happens when we peasants get access to reading skills and books.
Although the members of the Socialist workers party and handars on , were the biggest bunch of illiterates I ever did meet. 
And of course we were not discussing British writers , they were from everywhere but Blighty.
Orwell and company were the princes for the socialists , since their work did not involve any serious study.
I was always astounded that the Socialists were from the nice side of the tracks and seemed to enjoy hanging about with we scruffs .
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#onthisday in 1799, the three days of battle at the Trebbia in Northern Italy ended with Russian Field Marshal Alexander Vasilyevich Suvorov’s combined Russian and Austrian forces completely defeating the French under Jacques MacDonald.


A military genius, almost forgotten in the West, unravelled Napoleon’s successes in Northern Italy of 1796 during one summer in a brilliant campaign that was on par with the Corsican’s in every aspect. His masterpiece, though, were the three days on the Banks of the River Trebia, an old battlefield were Hannibal once had made his gory debut against the Romans in Italy.

But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/01/while-souvaroff-determined-to-obtain-it.html

Depicted below is a contemporary sketch of Cossack lancers charging at the Trebbia

#europeanhistory #history #militaryhistory #napoleonicwars
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Truth be told, I haven't stopped wondering over some of the details myself, as of yet... Neither did they back then, I dare say...
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12 June 1890, #onthisday the expressionist painter Egon Schiele was born in Tulln in Austria.

The ground was prepared for a new generation of artists who took it personal and transformed their own experience and surroundings into works of art like the Impressionists did a generation before. Admittedly, under rather different auspices. It was the next step beyond the processing of classical and historical allegories with an erotic note, ensembles still recognisable and intelligible by the public, into something more individual, far less accessible. It was the world of “Wiener Moderne”, the Viennese Modern Age, a Golden Age, or at least a gilded one, with gold foil covering decay and Angst and the artistic sublimation of life’s great disappointments. A world counteracted by the establishment with well understood Wagnerianisms, misunderstood Nietzsche, too bright uniforms and sabre rattling. A world of coffeehouse literati and neuritic novels, “Nervenroman”, Hofmannsthal, Schnitzler, Trakl at the Café Griensteidl and Café Central, the music of Bruckner and Mahler, the overripe flowers of Art Nouveau with Klimt as its somewhat unsavoury high priest and Sigmund the Great and his students sleuthing the psychic life with a metaphoric magnifying glass. The world of Egon Schiele, that was about to explode in the Great War and the catastrophe of the 20th century.

But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/01/art-cannot-be-modern-art-is.html

Depicted below is Egon Schiele’s: "Tod und Mädchen" (Death and the Maiden, 1915)

#art #arthistory #europeanart
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Well, I didn't even think of it as a marvel universe, in my kid days. I liked him because he was just a regular skinny nerd in glasses that got to swing around and climb stuff in cool ways.
Then later I also liked that he really is just a good guy trying to always act with the line, "with great power comes great responsibility" in mind.
I would thoroughly love to see a schiele drawing of spiderman. I am sure spidy's sensuality would be greatly enhanced with schiele's line. _Though  I imagine Schiele would surely be too busy being an artist to think of drawing a pop character.

(I also like batman because...
he's batman)
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3 June 1674, #onthisday  the 29’’ tall polymath and contemporary show star Matthias Buchinger was born in Ansbach, Bavaria.


He was the master entertainer among 18th century travelling showmen, an accomplished stage magician, knife thrower, trick-shot artist, musician and a remarkable draughtsman on top of it. And he stood just 29’’ tall and was born without hands and feet. The “Greastet German living” is a guest of honour in the #wunderkammer indeed. But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2016/06/the-greatest-german-living-master.html

Depicted below is a contemporary German broadsheet showing Matthias Buchinger exhibiting some of his show acts and many talents.

#arthistory #culturalhistory #europeanhistory #history #wunderkammer
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thanks a lot, dear +Dirk Puehl, for the comprehensive article on your blog... really enjoyed reading it... sometimes reading about such wonderful characters can teach you more lessons than reading about kings and conquerors... :D
think his secret was his superb intelligence...

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16 July 1782, #onthisday Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s “Die Entführung aus dem Serail” (The Abduction from the Seraglio) premiered at the Vienna Burgtheater with the composer conducting.


Mozart composed an intricately woven, timeless masterpiece. And intricately woven enough to make its enlightened absolutist commissioner Emperor Joseph II complain “Zu schön für unsere Ohren, und gewaltig viel Noten, lieber Mozart!", too beautiful for our ears and a mighty lot of notes and dear Mozart answered to his sovereign and eternity: “There are just as many notes as there should be“ while he used a cliché-laden libretto and its contemporary pop culture elements like hareem fantasies and lustful Turks and turned it into a surprisingly deep polyloque.

But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2016/07/in-moorish-lands-maiden-fair-mozarts-il.html

Depicted below is Anton Hickel’s "Roxelana and the Sultan" from 1780, an example of the then fashionable “Turquerie”, created about the same time as Mozart’s opera.

#culturalhistory #europeanmusic #musicalhistory
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Wagner? Oh dear... no, not quite... I just posted my household gods... nothing surprising, I fear, after all is said and done.
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1 July 552, after more than twenty years of death struggle between Eastern Rome and the Ostrogothic kingdom in Italy during Emperor Justinian’s attempt of reconquering the lost Western Empire, the Byzantine General Narses decisively defeated King Totila’s Goths in the Battle of Taginae in the Apennine Mountains, some 120 mile northeast of Rome.

It fell to the most unheroic figure imaginable, an elderly Armenian eunuch who was actually an imperial accountant by trade, to land the decisive blow in a war that has entered into the realm of legends long since. The pen pusher knew how to fight, though, and his decisive victory in a likewise legendary place that harkened back to Brennus the Gauls’ sack of Rome centuries before, was the beginning of the end of the Ostrogothic dream of a kingdom in Italy that began with Theoderic the Great.

But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/01/king-totilas-last-battle.html

Depicted below is King Totila, as imagined in Luca Signorelli's (1445 - 1523) Renaissance vision of "Benedict Discovers Totila's Deceit" (around 1500)

#ancienthistory #ancientrome #history #militaryhistory #romanhistory #völkerwanderungszeit
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My pleasure, really, Jay!
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Pirate Captain: [looks at Darwin’s house] You don’t get many girls, do you?

Darwin’s cabin - Details from the film set of Aardman’s 3D stop-motion animated swashbuckler comedy “The Pirates! In an Adventure with Scientists!“ – a marvellous #Wunderkammer! I want to move right in.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pirates!_In_an_Adventure_with_Scientists!

Pictures taken during an Aardman exhibition at the Deutsches Filmmuseum in Frankfurt

http://deutsches-filminstitut.de/en/
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: }
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16 June 1816, #onthisday, 200 years ago in eighteen hundred and froze to death, both Frankenstein and the ancestor of Dracula were conceived during a writing contest at the Villa Diodati on Lake Geneva by some of the most famous authors of the Romantic Age and Gothic fiction.

It actually was a dark and stormy night. Like most were, back then, in the year without summer. Lord Byron, already in exile, was probably in the right Gothic mood in eighteen hundred and froze to death and when the Shelleys, along with Byron’s ex-lover, Mary Shelley’s stepsister Claire Clairmont, paid him a visit at Villa Diodati, his refuge on Lake Geneva , the course was set for one of the most consequential events for popular fiction. Byron, Mary and Percy Shelley, Claire and Byron’s private physician John Polidori, something of a writer himself and paid by Byron’s publisher John Murray to keep a diary about the events, often couldn’t leave the house because of the awful weather but would meet every night, discuss, besides politics and philosophy, especially spiritism and occult phenomena, read German ghost stories and drink laudanum, an opium tincture dissolved in brandy and wine – and one fine evening, his lordship proposed that everyone present should write a Gothic story. A rather consequential notion that gave birth to two of pop culture’s best known horror icons.

But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/02/the-birth-of-frankenstein-and-ancestor.html

Depicted below is an atmospheric print of Villa Diodati with Byron in the foreground, stretched out decoratively á la Goethe in the Campana by an unknown artist, probably from mid-19th century

#europeanhistory #europeanliterature #history #literature #dracula   #frankenstein   #gothicnovel   #classicalhorror  
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Goes without saying, my dear, along with the deathly pale padre fingering the cross around his neck...
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11 June 1776, #onthisday 240 years ago, the English Romantic painter John Constable was born in East Bergholt, in the Stour Valley of Suffolk.

Gracing cookie boxes these days with the picturesque tranquillity and the assumed essential Englishness of the Suffolk countryside, Constable’s works were revolutionary once upon a time. Landscapes still ranked quite low in the hierarchy of paintings while historical, biblical and other mythological scenes and portraits were on top and the latter gaining mythological qualities with the Grand Manner of English 18th century artists like Reynolds and Gainsborough. And while Gainsborough actually loved to paint landscapes, he was forced to use them as allegorical backgrounds for his famous portraits since they sold better. One of Gainsborough’s admirers though took heart and decided to become a landscape artist and developed the genre to iconic quality, a Suffolk lad from the Stour valley named John Constable. But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/01/and-all-that-warmth-of-imagination.html


Depicted below is John Constable’s "Salisbury Cathedral from the Bishop's Garden" (1826)


#art #arthistory #europeanart
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He was a family man indeed, Constable was... and yes, there is the spirit of Turner haunting grieving Constable's canvasses...
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1 June 1813, #onthisday off Boston during the War of 1812, the British frigate HMS “Shannon”, Cpt. Philip Broke, captured USS “Chesapeake”, Cpt. James Lawrence, in a brief, bloody action.

They called her the “runt of the litter” of the 6 original US Navy frigates and she had a reputation of being an unlucky ship. Not a completely far-fetched notion. USS “Chesapeake” already made headlines in 1807 as the US Navy vessel being searched by the Royal Navy for deserters without mounting any kind of resistance during the “Chesapeake–Leopard Affair”, one of the major causes of the War of 1812 between Great Britain and the young United States. When war finally broke out five years later, she would be the one who broke the American run of victories at sea in single-ship duels.

But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2016/06/dont-give-up-ship-capture-of-uss.html

Depicted below is the Danish painter Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg’s (1783 – 1853) imagination of "The Fight between the English frigate Shannon and the American frigate "Chesapeake" from 1836.

#ageofsail #americanhistory #history #militaryhistory #navalhistory #warof1812
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Love it! #ageofsail
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"I deny nothing, but doubt everything.” Lord Byron
Introduction

About what I do and post here on Mother Google her networks:

Blood and thunder, artsy things, curiosities and lots of ships, everything featured in my little #onthisday-series. I post a daily feature about something that happened “on this day”, weather permitting.

Usually, the posts turn on Literature with a heavy focus on the 19th and early 20th century and silver screen adaptions. The dark and macabre, vampires, ghosts and ghoulies, the plain fantastic, the Byronic tradition in Europe, dandyism as well as Thomas Mann, Dostoevsky and Nietzsche. History, often military history, from antiquity to the dawn of the 20th century and everything an armchair sailor can come up with. Fine arts with pretty much the same foci during the said period as well as Mythology.

And besides that I currently collect curiosities online, often with a touch of #steampunk and exhibit them in my virtual #wunderkammer, an online cabinet of curiosities. 

Speaking of what. I don’t discuss politics on the Internet.

There is a legend from the beginning of the Great War: The German High Command cabled to their allies in Vienna: “The situation is serious but not hopeless!” and some wisecrack in Vienna cabled back: “No. The situation is hopeless but not serious.” That pretty much sums it up. ‘nuff said.

The same is true for religion. Although I am willing to discuss religion from a historical point of view, I am not interested to hear people’s personal persuasions on god(s) or atheism. If you are interested in my opinion – read The Brothers Karamazov.
It’s all in there.
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