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Dirk Puehl
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Dirk Puehl

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#onthisday  in 601, Reccared, first Catholic king of Visigothic Spain, died an uncommonly natural death in his capital of Toledo at the age of about 40.

With the mighty Franks breathing down their necks and more than enough internal conflicts on the Iberian Peninsula, Visigothic Spain was a bit of a hotbed of ideology and civil strife. But things took a turn for to the better when King Reccared renounced Arian heresy and became a good Catholic. Or didn’t they? Read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/05/the-morbus-gothicus-king-reccared-and.html

Depicted below is "The Conversion of King Reccared" as imagined by the Spanish painter Antonio Muñoz Degrain (1888)

#culturalhistory #europeanhistory  #history  #medievalhistory #sacredsunday  
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Still so close to the fading Imperium they could almost touch it, it makes me wonder-- the people had to have realized they had passed a watershed moment with the collapse of the Western Empire, that their world was in a sharp decline, that the various tribes had broken open the door and smashed the house where they'd wanted to take refuge. It had to be a very sad time for the members of society who had been involved in creating and maintaining the Empire's infrastructure.
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#onthisday  in 1768, the Dragon of Henham or “Flying Serpent” was seen by several witnesses in Essex.

Until quite recently, the existence of dragons was taken for granted by the founding fathers of natural science and alleged relics of the fabled beasts found their way into the cabinets of curiosity of rulers and scientists alike from all across the globe. Famously, not one of the beasts was captured alive though, but there were sightings, such as the one in Essex in the late 17th century. But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/05/never-laugh-at-live-dragons-dragon-of.html

Depicted below is the head of a dragon as imagined by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, a detail from his “Immaculate Conception” (c 1768)

 #earlymodernhistory  #europeanhistory  #folklore  #history #mythology  #naturalhistory #wunderkammer  
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Wonderful as ever!
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#onthisday  in 15 BCE, Germanicus Julius Caesar, celebrated Roman military hero, brother of Emperor Claudius and father of Caligula, was born in Rome.

Few periods of history are so full of propaganda as the earlies of Imperial Rome. But then, few periods saw masters like Augustus managing the concert of glorifying heritage, the state and himself as sustainable and, admittedly tasteful, as he did. After his death, the Julio-Claudian dynasty he had established indulged rather in squandering the inheritance, though. Nonetheless, his grandnephew Germanicus was celebrated as military hero centuries later and probably was, by and large, nothing more than an inflated propaganda show. But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/05/the-recovery-of-varian-eagles-under.html

Depicted below is the basalt bust of Germanicus, probably made in Egypt around 20 CE, now at the British Museum after having lost the nose and gaining a cross on the forehead in early Christian times.

#ancienthistory #ancientrome  #europeanhistory  #history #romanhistory  
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+Pavel Života ah i see. so how was your day?
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#onthisday  is the feast day of St Brendan the Navigator, one of the Twelve Apostles of Ireland and patron saint of mariners, elderly adventurers and whales.

A whale of a tale, with masses celebrated on the backs of giant marine creatures, maritime hell visions and, who knows, maybe even another pre-Columbian discovery of America made “St Brendan’s Voyage” a bestseller of the Middle Ages and the Age of Exploration. But read for yourselves on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/05/help-me-to-journey-beyond-familiar-and.html

Depicted below is Edward Reginald Frampton’s (1870 – 1923) somewhat symbolistic imagination of St Brendan’s Voyage.

#europeanhistory  #folklore  #history #literature  #medievalhistory  #mythology  #navalhistory
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On the other hand... you get free whale watching tours and a picnic... 
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#onthisday  in 1727, the English portrait and landscape painter Thomas Gainsborough was born (or christened) in Sudbury, Suffolk.

A new train of thought embarked upon a sentimental journey in mid-18th century Europe, taking philosophy, literature and the fine arts on board along with the new sensitivities of the emerging middle classes. Thomas Gainsborough’s paintings became a singular focal point in contrast to the Continental aristos’ Rococo tastes that famously ended in tears in 1789. But read more about Gainsborough’s conception of art on the brink of a new era here:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/05/a-sentimental-journey-thomas.html

Depicted below is Thomas Gainsborough’s “Blue Boy” that experienced a renaissance in popularity after it was sold to the U.S. in 1921 and became one of the most quoted works of art in pop culture, along with the Mona Lisa and “Whistler’s Mother”.

  #art   #arthistory   #culturalhistory   #europeanart   #europeanhistory #history  
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Portraits of Blue Boy and Pinkie lived at my grandparents' house. :)
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#onthisday  in 1904, the Russian painter Andrei Petrovich Ryabushkin died at the age of 42 in Lubvino, 50 miles southeast of St Petersburg.

Following up from painting en plein air and Realism around 1850, a group of artists calling themselves the Peredvizhniki, the Wanderers, Repin, Shishkin and Surikov among them, set forth to paint their Russia in her picturesque beauty and naming and shaming conditions, often with the same brushstroke. For a while, a young artist accompanied them, but somehow lost his way and ended up in the 17th century. Read more below about a romantically unromantic Russian artist, Andrei Petrovich Ryabushkin, a genius of capturing the contemplative boredom of everyday scenes:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/05/an-artist-observes-selects-guesses-and.html

Depicted below is Ryabushkin’s “Russian Women of the XVII century in Church” from 1899.

#art  #arthistory  #culturalhistory  #europeanart  #europeanhistory  #russianart
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Working on it!
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Dirk Puehl

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#onthisday  in 1434, twenty miles west of Prague, the Hussite Wars virtually ended with the Taborites’ and Oprhans’ defeat at the Battle of Lipany.

The Hussite Wars had devastated much of Southern Central Europe for 15 years, five crusades had been repelled by the Hussites who had been declared heretics by pope and emperor when the latter realised that "the Bohemians could be overcome only by Bohemians" and that happened when two of the Hussite factions clashed. More on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/05/only-bohemians-could-defeat-bohemians.html

Depicted below is Ludwig Marold’s imagination of the Battle of Lipany (1898)

 #earlymodernhistory  #europeanhistory  #history  #medievalhistory  #militaryhistory  #socialhistory
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Sounds wonderful - and have fun while you're at it :-)
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#onthisday  in 1899, the French animalière and realist artist Rosa Bonheur died in her atelier and now museum of Château de By in Thomery, some 50 miles south of Paris.

Several streams of art, social, cultural and scientific history coalesced during the 19th century into some rather unique flowers of genre art, in this case animal painting. One outstanding representative of the genus was Rosa Bonheur, caught between the extremes of the new style along the lines of Courbet’s Barbizon School, pure commercialism and undistinguished kitsch. But Rosa didn’t give a damn about conventions anyway – read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/05/but-suit-i-wear-is-my-work-attire-and.html

Depicted below is Rosa Bonheur’s most famous work, La foire du cheval (The Horse Fair), a scene from the life on the horse market in Paris, between 1852 and 1855, now at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

#art #arthistory  #culturalhistory  #europeanart
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Donedeal Firelands
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#onthisday  in 1812 near Lorient, Henry Hotham’s 74 gun ship-of-the-line HMS “Northumberland” brought the two French frigates “Ariane” and “Andromaque” to bay who, trying to slip the British blockade, returned home from a successful commerce raid out in the Atlantic.

The Napoleonic Wars at sea were, contrary to popular myth, not over after Trafalgar. Admittedly, French ships-of-the-line had become a “fleet in being”, blockaded by the Royal Navy in the Atlantic and Channel ports, but commerce raiding was still a very lucrative source of income for Breton privateers and smaller warships. But sometimes events turned hunters into the hunted – but read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/05/the-action-of-22-may-1812-of-brittany.html

Depicted below is the "Destruction of the French Frigates Arianne & Andromaque 22nd May 1812" as imagined by the contemporary English school after Thomas Withcombe (1763 - 1824).

#ageofsail   #europeanhistory #history   #militaryhistory     #napoelonicwars  
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Indeed. I wonder if Boney knew the story and cocked a snook at him when Hotham dined the ex-emperor aboard the "Superb" after his surrender to Maitland in Rochefort.
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#onthisday  in 1510, the Early Renaissance painter Sandro Botticelli died at the age of 65 in Florence.

“… forced to walk with crutches“ dying “infirm and decrepit”. Georgio Vasari, 16th century’s prime mover of the world of art critics, bathes the last years of Botticelli’s life in the darkest light. In fact, the painter never really recovered from Savonarola’s theocratic terror in Florence at the end of the 15th century and maybe from his unrequited love to a Genoese beauty twenty years earlier as well. However, he was buried at least at her feet and her countenance shines through the visions of beauty of early Renaissance art, created by Sandro Botticelli. But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/05/buried-at-la-bella-simonettas-feet.html 


Depicted below is Botticelli’s arguably greatest work, the “Birth of Venus” from 1486.

#art  #arthistory  #culturalhistory  #europeanart  #europeanhistory  #history #renaissanceart
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Absolutely :-)
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#onthisday in 1848, the Russian artist Viktor Mikhaylovich Vasnetsov, specialised in mythological and historical subjects with a symbolist touch, was born in a village of the Vyatka Governorate, 300 miles north of Kazan.

His post-Romantic, Symbolist visions painted after 1876 fell on the fertile ground laid by the Russian revivalists, a movement similar to those of most European nations bethinking themselves on their mostly imaginary roots back then in the second half of the 19th century. Vasnetsov became a key player among the Russian revivalists with his imaginations of fairy tale princesses, knights and flying carpets in a visual vehemence few other artists of the period achieved. Read more on:
 
http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/05/whole-inner-and-outer-make-up-of-nation.html
 
Depicted below is Vasnetsov’s “Bogatyrs”, showing the three mythical Russian knights Dobrynya Nikitich, Ilya Muromets and Alyosha Popovich in half-mythical, half-historic armour of the Kievan Rus (1898).

#art #arthistory #europeanart   #europeanhistory   #history   #mythology   #russianart   #culturalhistory  
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Из области " юмор " . Видиш трёх богатырей - средний может быть еврей .
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#onthisday  in 1588, Ole Worm, the Danish physician, antiquarian, scientist, Wunderkammer-proprietor and alleged translator of the infamous Necronomicon was born in Aarhus. 

At the dawn of modern history and science, men like Athanasius Kircher and Ole Worm planted the germs of later museums with the Cabinets of Curiosities, the original #wunderkammer, as microcosms uniting all varieties of science with exhibits of natural history and geology as well as pieces of what we today would regard as belonging to the ethnographic or archaeological variety or simply as objets d’art. And some, like Olaus Wormius, ended up inextricably linked with icons of weird fiction. But read for yourselves on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2015/05/de-vermis-mysteriis-of-ole-worm-early.html

Depicted below is An elaborate and quite wonderful reproduction of Ole Worm’s Wunderkammer from the Statens Naturhistoriske Museum in Copenhagen, a direct quote of the frontispiece of the “Museum Wormianum” of 1655.

#arthistory  #cthulhumythos  #culturalhistory  #europeanhistory  #history  #hplovecraft  #sciencehistory  #wunderkammer
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Except the Conqueror Worm, of course...
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"I deny nothing, but doubt everything.” Lord Byron
Introduction

About what I do and post here on Mother Google her networks:

Blood and thunder, artsy things, curiosities and lots of ships, everything featured in my little #onthisday-series. I post a daily feature about something that happened “on this day”, weather permitting.

Usually, the posts turn on Literature with a heavy focus on the 19th and early 20th century and silver screen adaptions. The dark and macabre, vampires, ghosts and ghoulies, the plain fantastic, the Byronic tradition in Europe, dandyism as well as Thomas Mann, Dostoevsky and Nietzsche. History, often military history, from antiquity to the dawn of the 20th century and everything an armchair sailor can come up with. Fine arts with pretty much the same foci during the said period as well as Mythology.

And besides that I currently collect curiosities online, often with a touch of #steampunk and exhibit them in my virtual #wunderkammer, an online cabinet of curiosities. 

Speaking of what. I don’t discuss politics on the Internet.

There is a legend from the beginning of the Great War: The German High Command cabled to their allies in Vienna: “The situation is serious but not hopeless!” and some wisecrack in Vienna cabled back: “No. The situation is hopeless but not serious.” That pretty much sums it up. ‘nuff said.

The same is true for religion. Although I am willing to discuss religion from a historical point of view, I am not interested to hear people’s personal persuasions on god(s) or atheism. If you are interested in my opinion – read The Brothers Karamazov.
It’s all in there.
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