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Dirk Puehl
Lives in Frankfurt am Main
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"I was going to ask you to play House, but I think you'd be a weird example for our children." (Susie to Calvin in "Weirdos from Another Planet")

... since there are probably more Star Wars geeks and Calvin & Hobbes aficionados like me following this collection than I can count... - you'll probably love the blend below as much as I do.

... and thank you, +Martin Bowes, for sharing it in the first place! 
 
A month ago, we featured Brian Kesinger’s delightful art that mashed the worlds of “Star Wars” and “Calvin And Hobbes” together, and since then, the artist has released plenty of other delightful illustrations following the same theme. Check ’em out! Too…
A month ago, we featured Brian Kesinger's delightful art that mashed the worlds of "Star Wars" and “Calvin And Hobbes” together, and since then, the art
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Very good, +Dirk Puehl​
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"Poor little foal of an oppressèd race!
I love the languid patience of thy face." (Samuel Coleridge) 
 
On this week's edition of Animals in Literature and History, an 1856 legal dispute over a stolen pet donkey found by his owner many years later pulling a costermonger's cart in London.

#Victorian   #Law   #Animal   #History  
In England, sometime about 1843, a donkey was born at the farm of the Wheatley family in Shinfield, near Reading. This donkey was so remarkably small that it was given as a pet to farmer Wheatley’...
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“Possession make you rich? I don't have that type of richness. My richness is Life, forever.” (Bob Marley)

Once upon a time, school was over for good, I had just returned to Germany and was promptly conscripted into almost two years of the compulsory community service we had back then and became the morbid mobile aid agency’s man (“You! In your black rags again!” – “I’ll kill you, you old hag you! Raskolnikov! Where is my hatchet?”) in the morning and the world’s worst paid office girl in the afternoon, nomadised from friends’ flats to the backrooms of my favourite cafes and back since I had no permanent place to stay, was drunk as a rule, permanently broke, reading Sartre and Dostoevsky for breakfast, was crossed in love on a regular basis… it was a good time, somehow, though and somehow, I constantly listened to Bob Marley songs. And still quite fancy him – here is one of my favourites:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=amGI5T0JGDc

So, Happy Birthday, Mr Marley!

P.S.: What does the Reggae fan say when the weed’s all gone? – “Turn off that crappy music!” Sorry. Got the better of me. 
 
On this day in 1945, Robert Nesta “Bob” Marley was born in Jamaica to Cedella Booker and Norval Sinclair Marley.
His mother was a native of Jamaica and his father a white Jamaican of British and rumored Syrian Jewish descent who was an officer in the British military. Marley was ten years old when Norval died of a heart attack in 1955 at age 70.

By age 16, Marley had recorded his first single ‘Judge Not’, and in 1963, he formed The Wailers with Peter Tosh, Bunny Livingstone, Junior Braithwaite, and Beverly Kelso.

Braithwaite and Kelso left the group in 1965, but the Wailers continued as a trio, Marley, Tosh, and Livingstone trading leads. In 1966 the group had separated and the band dissolved. 

Marley married his girlfriend Rita Anderson while working in a factory in Newark before his return to Jamaica where the Wailers reunited. Throughout this period, the Wailers committed themselves to the religious sect of Rastafari.

The Wailers would have their breakthrough in 1972 when Chris Blackwell - who had released 'Judge Not' in England in 1963 - signed the Wailers to Island Records and advanced them the funds to make a record in Jamaica. 

The first result of their new contract was in1973 when the album Burnin', which included the songs "Get Up, Stand Up" and "I Shot The Sheriff” reached an international audience for the first time.

The band toured excessively during this period, and Marley expanded the instrumental section of the group, bringing in a female vocal trio, which included his wife, Rita. 
Now called Bob Marley and the Wailers, they toured Europe, Africa, and America, building especially strong followings in the U.K., Scandinavia, and Africa.

In 1976, Marley was shot by gunmen during the Jamaican election campaign, but survived and continued to soar in popularity until his 1981 death due to brain, lung and stomach cancer. 

Rita Marley continues to run the Tuff Gong studios and record company.


razmatazmag.com

#bobmarley   #happybirthday   #onthisday   #music   #musichistory   #history   #legend     #reggae   #guitar   #guitarist     #razmatazmag   #today  
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Me too. I'd make a terrible soprano. 
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"And history with all her volumes vast,
Hath but one page." (Lord Byron)

... if you have a bit of time on your hands - help a wonderful person with a charming project and get in touch with Simona.
 
You like memories? Do you know what happened today in other years ? Follow my page,   +Today's Memory!
Also, this page needs at least one more curator! Tell me if you can help me, will be a great adventure in history! Share to your friends, if you can't help it!
Thank you!
Memories - celebrations, great people in painting, sculpture, music, dance, literature, film, science...
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Big hug back :-)
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31 January 1912, #onthisday "It's a Long Way to Tipperary", written and first performed by Jack Judge, premiered in a Stalybridge music hall in the Greater Manchester area. 


When yours truly drove down the N24 from Limerick for the first time, one could still see the "You've come a long way..." signs. I whistled the tune, again, naturally, even though Tipperary had created the Tipperary International Peace Award, described as "Ireland's outstanding award for humanitarian work" six years before to counter against the town being associated with war and popular war songs. Still though, the song and at least the name of the town is best remembered across the world in association with Tommies marching to the Great War, from pop icons like the crew of “Das Boot” to Marcie from the “Peanuts” singing “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary”. But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2016/01/youve-come-long-way-premier-of-another.html 

Depicted below is a sheet music cover from a United States/Canada issue of "It’s a Long Way to Tipperary“ (before 1918)

#culturalhistory #europeanhistory   #europeanmusic   #history   #militaryhistory
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+Dirk Puehl I would not doubt it for a second..he was in one of the choirs in his regiment,  they sang in London..and also kissed the Blarney Stone...so anything goes with this wonderful old man...:-)
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22 – 23 January 1879, #onthisday , a few hours after the Battle of Isandlwana on the border of Natal and Zululand, about 150 British and colonial troops fought for their lives at the defence of the former mission station of Rorke’s Drift against a vast superiority of Zulu warriors under Prince Dabulamanzi kaMpande.

“... it is monstrous making heroes of those who shut up in buildings at Rorke’s Drift, could not bolt, and fought like rats for their lives which they could not otherwise save", Sir Garnet Wolseley wrote bewildered after he had relieved overchallenged Chelmsford from his command in Zululand, alluding to the 11 Victoria Crosses awarded to the defenders of Rorke’s Drift, the greatest number of the highest British military decoration ever won by a single unit on one day. But besides fighting for their own lives, they had saved the reputation of the British Army, defeated at Isandlwana as well as that of Chelmsford and Sir Bartle Frere, British High Commissioner of South Africa, who had instigated the whole bloody mess of the Anglo-Zulu War of 1879 in the first place. 

But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2016/01/men-of-harlech-defence-of-rorkes-drift.html

Depicted below is Elizabeth Thompson, Lady Butler’s imagination of "The Defence of Rorke's Drift" from 1880

#history #militaryhistory  #victoriana  #victorianage
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Dirk Puehl

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#onthisday , the bloody but indecisive Action of 7 February 1813 was fought on the shores of Guinea between two almost evenly matched frigates, the French “Aréthuse” and HMS “Amelia”.

Commerce raiding, the guerre de course, “war of chase” or Kreuzerkrieg, “war of cruisers”, wasn’t exactly a brand new idea when, during the second half of the 19th century, the French Jeune École came forth with their concept of new naval strategies to counter large battle fleets, usually that of the Royal Navy. With his remaining heavy-weights blockaded, bottled up and rotting at anchor in the various naval bases from Brest to Toulon after Trafalgar, Denis Decrès, Napoleon’s Minister of the Navy, had practically no other choice than resort to the old tradition of the guerre de course and anticipating the Jeune École by 50 years to do at least something against the British at sea. Consequently, in December 1812, a brace of “Pallas”-class frigates, “Rubis” and “Aréthuse”, slipped the British blockade and sailed for West Africa for their guerre de course.

But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2016/02/as-is-usual-in-few-cases-of-drawn.html


Depicted below is the French naval painter Louis-Philippe Crépin’s (1772–1851) imagination of: "The battle between Aréthuse and Amelia on the shores of Guinea, 7 February 1813" (before 1820)


#europeanhistory #history   #militaryhistory   #nageofsail   #napoleonicwars   #navalhistory
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+Dirk Puehl ...and, to think. men actually lived to tell the tale of the tremendous battles with all their fire and blood in the sunset of war....
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"We bear our shades about us; self-deprived
Of other screen, the thin umbrella spread,
And range an Indian waste without a tree."
(William Cowper)

Good to have you back, dear Chryssa!
 
under my umbrella
I thought to make a series of street photographs in the rainy days shooting under my red umbrella. The problem is that it doesn't rain too often. This is my best attempt so far.
A couple in a coffee shop and the reflection of my umbrella in the window.
And a song: Umbrella -Casey Abrams & The Sole Sisters:
youtu.be/OBmlCZTF4Xs
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Me too :-)
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4 February 1857, #onthisday Hermann Schaaffhausen presented his ideas about the origins of fossil bones found a year before in the Neander valley near Düsseldorf in a meeting of the Niederrheinische Gesellschaft für Natur- und Heilkunde (Lower Rhine Society for Natural History and Medical Studies) in Bonn. It was the first public scientific recognition of the human species later known as Neanderthal.

A flat head, one of Attila's roaming horde's men, a Cossack from the Napoleonic Wars and what not… speculations about the former owner of the bones found in the Neanderthal mine in August 1856 ran wild. And there was, of course, the ongoing discussion of the validity of Darwin’s “On the Origin of Species” and evolution. The poor Neanderthal was defamed as Homo stultus and many refused to believe any closer relationship with us until well into the 20th century. But he was, as more recent discoveries showed, far underrated and there is a bit of Neanderthal still in many of us epigones of the Ice Age.

But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2016/02/in-neighboring-neanderthal-surprising.html

#culturalhistory   #europeanhistory   #history   #sciencehistory
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Thank you, +Ian Chiapco.
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"Catullus was the leading representative of a revolution in poetry created by the neoteroi or "new men" in Rome. Rather than writing about battles, heroes, and the pagan gods, Catullus draws his subjects from everyday, intensely personal life."

I suppose you can do far worse than reading Catullus on a rainy, dreary Monday evening...
 
Catullus VII (translated by me)

You ask me, my Lesbia, how many spells,
of your kissing would be enough for me and more.
As great as the number of Libyan sand,
That lies in silphium-bearing Cyrene,
Between the oracle of sultry Jove,
And the holy tomb of old Battus himself,
Or as many as the stars, when the night is still,
Which watch the secret loves of mortal men.
To kiss you with just so many kisses
Is enough and more for mad Catullus
Neither can the inquisitive count them
Nor the evil tongue bewitch them.

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But that's the fun about it, isn't it?
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27 January 1850, #onthisday, the English painter John Maler Collier was born in London.


The Edwardian wilderness of post-war England and the final triumph of the new modernist age sounded the bell for Pre-Raphaelite narratives and imagery along with those of Academic Art. Rossetti and his successors and epigones, Collier among them, were quite forgotten. Ironically enough, the original Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood of Rossetti, Millais, Holman Hunt et al had virtually dissolved, when Collier was just three years old and by the time he celebrated his greatest successes, the once avant-garde style of the Brotherhood had been superseded by the late Victorian styles it had spawned two decades before, Symbolism, Aestheticism, Arts-and-Crafts, Decadence, Art Nouveau and what not. However, Collier managed to become one. Of the most popular painters of his time. But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2016/01/soar-to-higher-things-late-pre.html

Depicted below is John Collier’s iconic “Lady Godiva” from 1898.

#art #arthistory #europeanart
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Thank you. "... it is impossible to reconcile the art of Alma-Tadema with that of Matisse, Gauguin and Picasso", Collier later wrote. He suffered the fame fate, I fear. 
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16 January 1809, #onthisday, the first British intervention in the Peninsular War and John Moore’s subsequent Corunna Campaign ended with the Battle of Corunna and the death of the illustrious general in A Coruña, Galicia, on the coast of north-western Spain.

Gifted commander Sir John Moore, father of the British Light Infantry, had put his head already far above the parapet when he found himself almost surrounded by three French corps a few dozen miles west of Madrid. The city had already surrendered to Napoleon himself and Moore forced his army to run back to the coast along the passes of the snow-covered mountains of Léon and Galicia to save what could be saved with the French in hot pursuit. While More’s Lights skirmished to cover the retreat of the infantry, discipline deteriorated with every force-marched step and one of the darkest chapters in the History of the British Army began.

But read more on:

http://wunderkammertales.blogspot.de/2016/01/we-have-suffered-shameful-disaster.html

Depicted below is a scene from the British retreat to Corunna, as imagined by an unknown artist. 

#europeanhistory  #history  #militaryhistory  #napoleonicwars
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Not sure if I get the reference...
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"I deny nothing, but doubt everything.” Lord Byron
Introduction

About what I do and post here on Mother Google her networks:

Blood and thunder, artsy things, curiosities and lots of ships, everything featured in my little #onthisday-series. I post a daily feature about something that happened “on this day”, weather permitting.

Usually, the posts turn on Literature with a heavy focus on the 19th and early 20th century and silver screen adaptions. The dark and macabre, vampires, ghosts and ghoulies, the plain fantastic, the Byronic tradition in Europe, dandyism as well as Thomas Mann, Dostoevsky and Nietzsche. History, often military history, from antiquity to the dawn of the 20th century and everything an armchair sailor can come up with. Fine arts with pretty much the same foci during the said period as well as Mythology.

And besides that I currently collect curiosities online, often with a touch of #steampunk and exhibit them in my virtual #wunderkammer, an online cabinet of curiosities. 

Speaking of what. I don’t discuss politics on the Internet.

There is a legend from the beginning of the Great War: The German High Command cabled to their allies in Vienna: “The situation is serious but not hopeless!” and some wisecrack in Vienna cabled back: “No. The situation is hopeless but not serious.” That pretty much sums it up. ‘nuff said.

The same is true for religion. Although I am willing to discuss religion from a historical point of view, I am not interested to hear people’s personal persuasions on god(s) or atheism. If you are interested in my opinion – read The Brothers Karamazov.
It’s all in there.
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Pellinore