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Dharma Sculpture Buddhist & Hindu Statues
One of a kind hand crafted Buddhist works of art!
One of a kind hand crafted Buddhist works of art!
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This beautiful rose with saffron tones Cambodian Buddha statue was recently carved from an antique piece of wood. Lord Buddha has a wonderful serene expression and a faint smile. He is depicted in the bhumisparsha mudra also known as the earth touching gesture. The ushnisha, protuberance above his head also referred to as a topknot, symbolizes His wisdom and openness as an enlightened being. He has elongated earlobes, a vestige of his life as a prince, when he wore extravagant jewelry. This beautiful wood sculpture is a one of a kind statue, hand carved by the very talented artists of Cambodia!
http://www.dharmasculpture.com/category/new-arrivals.html
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In her white form, Tara confers longevity and fulfills earthly desires through the activities of pacifying, increasing and subjugating. In her left hand she hold a lotus, a symbol of the mind's innate purity. Her right hand is stretched outward in the boon-granting gesture (varada mudra). On both palms, as well as on the soles of her feet are eyes of transcendent wisdom, symbolizing that all her activities are conducted with complete awareness. The inverted eye on her forehead indicates her enlightened vision. If we see through to Tara's essence, she frees us from self-serving thoughts and encourages us to act.

The base of the piece is sealed with a double vajra symbolizing the balance of the four elements and harmony of the four directions. This lost wax method copper sculpture is a one of a kind statue, hand cast by the very talented artists of the beautiful country of Nepal. Every piece is truly unique!

http://www.dharmasculpture.com/category/new-arrivals.html
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Lord Buddha's hand is held up in abhaya mudra also known as the gesture of protection. The ushnisha, protuberance above his head also referred to as a topknot, symbolizes His wisdom and openness as an enlightened being. The Buddha is always depicted with elongated earlobes, a vestige of his life as a prince, when he wore extravagant jewelry. This wood sculpture is a one of a kind statue, hand carved by the very talented artists of Cambodia.
http://www.dharmasculpture.com/category/new-arrivals.html
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This Buddha sculpture is shown in Parinirvana. In Buddhism, Parinirvana is the final nirvana, usually within reach only upon the death of the body of someone who has attained complete awakening or bodhi. It is the ultimate goal of Buddhist practice and implies a release from the cycle of deaths and rebirths as well as the dissolution of all worldly physical and mental aggregates or skandhas (perception or consciousness). Lord Buddha is shown resting peacefully. His eyes and face have a serene demeanor showing Siddhartha at ease with passing from this world escaping from the cycle of samsara.
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This natural color macassar ebony wood Buddha statue is in the vitarka mudra also known as the teaching gesture. Lord Buddha is seated in dhyana asana, the meditative pose also called padmasana. A beautiful Buddharupa, perfect for a home altar or meditation room. This wood sculpture is a one of a kind statue, hand carved by the very talented artists of Cambodia.
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This beautifully serene Balinese wood Buddha stands on an intricately carved three-tiered lotus base. Lord Buddha's right hand is raised in the abhaya mudra also known as the gesture of protection. In his left hand he holds a small vessel which in both Buddhism and Hinduism alike is said to contain amrita, the divine nectar of the gods which was also believed to have healing properties.

This Buddha is carved from the trunk of a rain-tree. The natural gradation of the wood from dark to light color throughout this piece is stunning! Only master artisans are experienced enough to carve full tree carvings. The artist must have a very keen eye in order to see the contour and shape of the tree and bring life to it. The back of this sculpture is also fully carved. This sculpture was entirely hand carved in the living postcard island of Bali.
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Lord Buddha's face exudes an intense sweetness and serenity. A slight, enigmatic smile plays across his lips. Long, pendulous earlobes reach down to touch his shoulders. This beautiful kneeling Buddha is inlaid with red, green and silver glass mosaic. This teak wood sculpture is a one of a kind statue, hand carved by the very talented artists of Myanmar (Burma).

To view and learn more about our recently acquired Burmese Buddha statues, please click on the link below.

http://www.dharmasculpture.com/category/burmese-buddha-statues.html
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This Khmer golden Buddha statue is in the vitarka mudra which is interpreted as the hand gesture that evokes the energy of teaching and intellectual discussion or argument. It is said that it mostly feels like the transmission of a particular teaching with no words and that the circle formed by the thumb and index finger create a constant flow of energy and information.

http://www.dharmasculpture.com/category/cambodian-buddha-statues.html

http://www.dharmasculpture.com/category/new-arrivals.html
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In this beautiful sculpture the eight-faced, sixteen-armed, four-footed Hevajra is depicted lithely dancing clasping his consort Nairatmya (“selfless one”) in a close embrace.

All eight faces are wrathful, seven on the main body, the eighth surmounting them. His hair is bristling upwards while being completely surrounded by flames of pristine awareness.

One pair of legs assumes a powerful stance, the left knee bent (alidha), the other pair assumes a dancer's pose (ardha pariyanka). Crushed underneath are four corpses representing the four Maras or demons who embody all the active hindering forces within the psyche and in the objective world, that work to deflect us from the spiritual goal. In his eight right hands he holds eight skull cups each containing an animal: an elephant, a horse, a donkey, an ox, a camel, a man, a tiger and a cat. In his eight left hands he also holds eight skull cups with the eight deities of the cardinal directions.

Nairatmya, the consort of Hevajra has two hands and two legs. In her left hand she holds a skull cup while the right hand holds a vajra. Her left leg is bent down along with his, while her right leg is wrapped around his waist. Her expression is also wrathful. They both wear elaborate belts with beaded festoons, garlands of severed heads and skull tiaras.

Carrying skull cups in all of the hands is one of the most distinctive features of Hevajra. The skull cup represents the mind aspect of the body, speech, and mind notion. It also represents death and impermanence, the illusory nature of all the phenomena. The animals and gods in Hevajra’s skull cup may symbolize a universal range of all matter and beings, alive, on earth and in the heavens. Thus, the sixteen skull cups collectively symbolize the sixteen voidness or Shunyata.

Hevajra is a wrathful emanation of the Buddha Akshobhya. He is a popular deity in Tibet, where he belongs to the yidam (tutelary, or guardian, deity) class. His worship is the subject of the Hevajra Tantra, a scripture that helped bring about the conversion of the Mongol emperor Kublai Khan (1215–94). He is one of the more common yet complex deities depicted in Buddhist art!
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This serene golden Burmese Buddha statue is seated in padmasana with the left hand resting on his lap and right hand extending over the knee in the bhumisparsa mudra. Lord Buddha's erectly held head, framed by large curved ears and tall ushnisha, surmounted by a water drop shaped finial, has the sharply chiseled features and downcast eyes associated with late Ava period figures. The Buddha is seated on a scalloped lotus leaf that resets on a magnificent throne formed by the broad shoulders of a trio of caparisoned elephants (gajasana). This wood sculpture is a one of a kind statue, hand carved by the very talented artists of Myanmar (Burma). Every piece is truly unique!
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