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Derek Waters
Attended University of Adelaide
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Derek Waters

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Check this site out, thou pernicious thimbles!
 
Thou art a swollen boil! 

Check out the Shakespeare insult generator we created with +Google Australia, and have fun insulting your friends (or foes)

http://shakespeare450thbirthday.appspot.com/ 
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Derek Waters

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Straws in the Alexandra Cave at the Naracoorte Caves World Heritage Area.
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Vanilla Slice Roadtrip Review

Wow! This came as a surprise. The pastry on this slice was absolutely outstanding, flaky and crisp, and the custard was great. If I had to be picky, the slice was topped with icing sugar only, which is fine, but I inhaled some of it as I maneuvered in to take the first bite. But that was a minor quibble in an otherwise superlative vanilla slice experience. And all the more amazing because the other products of the same bakery were pretty terrible - a true diamond in the rough! From the French Country Bakery in Hamilton. 9/10
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Good stuff mate.  Bet you were hanging out for a good one after the last two.  I prefer them without icing sugar so it'd be perfect for me  :)
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Vanilla Slice Roadtrip Review

This vanilla slice, from Waack's bakery in Horsham, was OK. The custard was pretty good, with a smooth creamy texture, and good vanilla flavor. The pastry was a bit weird, with my dining companion making a comparison to a Sao biscuit rather than the expected pastry. Also on a negative note, the icing on top was very very sweet and almost overpowered the custard filling. 5/10.

Bonus: Lens Blur from the new Android Camera app.


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We call them custard slice.
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/claps

That is a headline.
FIFE: The annual world fish-eating championship was held in its traditional home, the fishing centre of Fife, Scotland, yesterday — but not without some late high drama.
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That is something special
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Building ffmpeg
Or, how to lose your will to live using open source.

For... um... reasons... I had to try and build ffmpeg (www.ffmpeg.org) for Windows from source. "Hey", I thought, "this seems easy. Just look, the website has a page dedicated to building the software - it says it just takes a few minutes!" (http://trac.ffmpeg.org/wiki/CompilationGuide)  How wrong I was.

So, my first attempt was to build using Visual Studio. So, all you need is Visual Studio. And a C99-C89 converter. And YASM. And some dodgy header files. And MSYS. Oh, and MSYS basically means you're getting MinGW. Ugh. Even after getting all of that set up, trying to configure the makefiles for Visual Studio still failed.

Oh well, I thought, it says you can build it using cross compilation tools in Linux. After following the instructions, with the obligatory fiddling around with library version updates etc. I found that the distro of Linux I was using (Mint) didn't have the required level of some core libraries. Sigh. Create a new Fedora VM and try again. This time I got quite a bit further in the process, but there were still issues with library incompatibility - I have now managed to completely excise those painful errors from my brain.

OK, OK, the third method is to build on Windows using Cygwin and MinGW. So I span up a new Windows VM. I used Windows 8, this time, which isn't really easy to use in a Windowed VM player - damn you charms! So, I used a script from here: 

http://blog.h-quer.de/post/2013/05/15/building-ffmpeg-on-Windows-(2-of-n).aspx 

which claimed to set everything up for you. Well, that sort of worked, except that the script version it pointed to no longer works with the latest ffmpeg source. Sigh. So, after a bit more fiddling around, manually running ./configure commands and playing with ENV variables, I finally, miraculously, had an ffmpeg.exe I could test. And it worked! Craziness. So, I instantly shipped it off to the destination server where I needed to use the application.

And it failed. Because it was a 64 bit executable, and the target machine was 32 bit. Grrrrrrr. I then spent a while trying to play with all the ./configure command line parameters for building both the cygwin libraries and ffmpeg before smashing my head into the table in frustration.

Finally, I found the link below. Using a fresh Linux VM (Fedora 20 for those playing at home) I downloaded and ran the script. Two prompts later, it told me I was missing a large set of packages. I installed them, then ran the script again, and it promptly failed because there were more dependencies (gcc-c++ for one) that weren't checked the first time around. Then, after a (long) while as the script built the mingw compiler, from scratch, then built all of the shared libraries required, from scratch, the x264 library compilation failed. Sigh. Turned out the x264_opencl stuff that was retrieved from github couldn't be built. Deciding that x264 OpenCL support wasn't actually needed for my purposes, I did what any good C programmer would do, and commented out the offending lines - x264_opencl_cache_load and x264_opencl_source being the "undefined reference" culprits. And then I crossed my fingers, crossed my toes and ran the script again. This time everything built.

I transferred the files to my testing (Windows 32 bit) VM, and miracle of miracles, they work.

tl; dr: ffmpeg for Windows? Use a fresh Linux install with the script from the link.

#ffmpeg   #opensource  
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This is why we believe in our overlords: Package maintainers. They are the gods that give us the binaries that we chew on.

Either that, or we run Gentoo! 
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Recent bushfires have really hit The Grampians hard. Even the Mackenzie Falls area has been closed to tourists - we diverted to the Grand Canyon track up to The Pinnacle which was like a highway it was so busy!

The photo above is taken at the Zumsteins which must only just have opened after being closed by the last set of bushfires.
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Vanilla Slice Roadtrip Review

This was an ordinary vanilla slice. The custard was completely flavorless, the pastry was passable and the icing was cloying and very very sticky. Would not eat again. From a bakery in Penola. 2/10. 
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What did you expect for Penola, a miracle ;)
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An interesting byproduct of the #Heartbleed bug is that a number of other limitations of SSL/TLS are surfacing.

In this case, it's not that Chrome is ignoring revoked certificates entirely, they've just got a performance optimized revocation check that works OK when there are few certificates being revoked, but is really going to struggle in the next few days/weeks to keep up with all the revoked/reissued certificates. But the way Chrome is checking revocation lists does mean that loading HTTPS sites is much quicker than the proper revocation check.

Basically, when your browser accesses a https site, it retrieves the site's "certificate", a cryptographically signed record that the site is what it says it is. The certificate is issued by a Certificate Authority (CA) who are independent of the site but provide a third party verification check. When a site gets compromised, they can get their original certificate revoked by the CA.

The web browser, then, when a site returns a certificate, has to do a further check by contacting the CA web site to ensure the certificate hasn't been revoked. This extra check could add anywhere up to a second to the load time of a https site. Additionally, if the CA web servers are down, then any certificates issued by them should, in theory, not be treated as valid. Because this is a likely scenario, browser's typically treat a unable-to-contact-CA as a pass, meaning the CA check is kind of useless anyway. Chrome optimizes this process by generating its own big list of revoked certificates that it updates in the background from time to time. It seems this #CRLset though, is not very large and is unable to cope with all of the revocations going on with the Heartbleed issues. As indicated in the linked article, you can make Chrome operate in the standard (but slower) way using settings.

As an aside, I tried to check this in Chrome for Android - I assume it uses the CRLset too, as I could view the site with the revoked certificate, but I haven't found the setting to use proper checking yet, if it exists at all.
 
Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait. +Google Chrome doesn't check for revoked SSL certificates by default when every other browser does?

What the hell? If you're reading this, enable it in advanced Chrome settings right away.
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We may have a new IPA winner... This is awesome.
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I also had it on tap at "Hell of the North" in Brunswick Fitzroy. Mrs Parma's (despite the average decor and awful name) is worth a visit.
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Have him in circles
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Work
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Software Engineer
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Male
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Not really Lord Flashheart
Introduction
Android and web developer, cyclist, father, Collingwood supporter
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Once helped Kamahl with directions
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  • University of Adelaide
    Engineering
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Great service and good coffee. Avocado breakfast was very nice too.
Public - a week ago
reviewed a week ago
Australian Home Brewing has a great selection of recipe kits, raw materials and equipment for the home brewer, and their service is great - whether contacting you to let you know that something you ordered is going to take a while on backorder (and asking if you want to replace it with something else, or send the rest of the order in advance) to replacing an entire order of mine that went missing in delivery, they're very helpful.
Quality: ExcellentAppeal: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Great food on the set menu. An interesting set of beer and wine selections. And the grill pumps an awesome aroma into the restaurant as you enter!
Atmosphere: ExcellentDecor: Very goodService: Good
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
The breakfast burrito at Las Chicas is justifiably famous. I've tried many times to reproduce it at home, without success. Coffee is great, the only downside is its own success, which means you can expect to wait a while to get a table at weekends. Any wait is well worth it, though!
Food: ExcellentDecor: ExcellentService: Very good
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
7 reviews
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We had an impromptu dinner at Cumulus Inc last night, just stumbling upon it as we wandered along Flinders Lane looking for somewhere to eat. Firstly, the food was fantastic. We had one of the specials - fried peppers - which were great. Salty and smoky, although they weren't at all hot. Some quite nice asparagus was served with a wonderful slow-cooked egg, which had a yolk and white that were the consistency of jam; it was great. A nice corned brisket was served with a cabbage salad with a kick of horseradish, but all of these dishes were topped by an awesome tuna tartare with big, juicy cubes of impeccable tuna that really melted in the mouth. Wonderful! The restaurant (or eating house/bar, as it styles itself) was buzzing when we arrived, even late on a Tuesday night. The noise certainly dropped off as the night progressed, making for a more laid-back experience. Unfortunately, the service was a little mixed. When it was there, it was almost over-friendly, but sometimes the service was non-existent. Overall, though, don't let that put you off - the food is worth every minute of the wait.
• • •
Food: ExcellentDecor: ExcellentService: Very good
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
New favourite Hume Highway stop. It's like a great city cafe was transplanted to the country, with only a rural name change. Great coffee, and my ploughman's lunch was superb!
Food: ExcellentDecor: Very goodService: Excellent
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Had a wheel rebuild and servicing of my MTB here. Great workshop, helpful staff, good prices.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago