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Derek Hohls
Works at CSIR
Attended University of KwaZulu-Natal
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Watch a replay of last night's successful launch of Sentinel-1A, a key satellite for the earth observation community.

Even after 50 years, the sight of a launch still stirs the heart.  As Mike Collins summed it up so eloquently, we are still "Carrying the Fire"!

#satellite   #earthobservation  
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On sale today from our local cloud-shop...
#teleport #iphone #android #groupon
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Google's perspective on Glass.  Still a technology to watch...
 
The Top 10 Google Glass Myths

Mr. Rogers was a Navy SEAL. A tooth placed in soda will dissolve in 24 hours. Gators roam the sewers of big cities and Walt Disney is cryogenically frozen. These are just some of the most common and -- let’s admit it -- awesome urban myths out there. 

Myths can be fun, but they can also be confusing or unsettling. And if spoken enough, they can morph into something that resembles fact. (Side note: did you know that people used to think that traveling too quickly on a train would damage the human body?)

In its relatively short existence, Glass has seen some myths develop around it. While we’re flattered by the attention, we thought it might make sense to tackle them, just to clear the air. And besides, everyone loves a good list:

Myth 1 - Glass is the ultimate distraction from the real world
Instead of looking down at your computer, phone or tablet while life happens around you, Glass allows you to look up and engage with the world. Big moments in life -- concerts, your kid’s performances, an amazing view -- shouldn’t be experienced through the screen you’re trying to capture them on. That’s why Glass is off by default and only on when you want it to be. It’s designed to get you a bit of what you need just when you need it and then get you back to the people and things in life you care about. 

Myth 2:  Glass is always on and recording everything
Just like your cell phone, the Glass screen is off by default. Video recording on Glass is set to last 10 seconds. People can record for longer, but Glass isn't designed for or even capable of always-on recording (the battery won’t last longer than 45 minutes before it needs to be charged). So next time you’re tempted to ask an Explorer if he’s recording you, ask yourself if you’d be doing the same with your phone. Chances are your answers will be the same.

Myth 3 - Glass Explorers are technology-worshipping geeks
Our Explorers come from all walks of life. They include parents, firefighters, zookeepers, brewmasters, film students, reporters, and doctors. The one thing they have in common is that they see the potential for people to use technology in a way that helps them engage more with the world around them, rather than distract them from it. In fact, many Explorers say because of Glass they use technology less, because they’re using it much more efficiently. We know what you’re thinking: “I’m not distracted by technology”. But the next time you’re on the subway, or, sitting on a bench, or in a coffee shop, just look at the people around you. You might be surprised at what you see.

Myth 4 - Glass is ready for prime time
Glass is a prototype, and our Explorers and the broader public are playing a critical role in how it’s developed. In the last 11 months, we’ve had nine software updates and three hardware updates based, in part, on feedback from people like you. Ultimately, we hope even more feedback gets baked into a polished consumer product ahead of being released. And, in the future, today's prototype may look as funny to us as that mobile phone from the mid 80s.

Myth 5: Glass does facial recognition (and other dodgy things) Nope. That’s not true. As we’ve said before, regardless of technological feasibility, we made the decision based on feedback not to release or even distribute facial recognition Glassware unless we could properly address the many issues raised by that kind of feature.  And just because a weird application is created, doesn’t mean it’ll get distributed in our MyGlass store. We manually approve all the apps that appear there and have several measures in place (from developer policies and screenlocks to warning interstitials) to help protect people’s security on the device.

Myth 6: Glass covers your eye(s)
“I can't imagine having a screen over one eye...” one expert said in a recent article. Before jumping to conclusions about Glass, have you actually tried it? The Glass screen is deliberately above the right eye, not in front or over it. It was designed this way because we understand the importance of making eye contact and looking up and engaging with the world, rather than down at your phone.
 
Myth 7 - Glass is the perfect surveillance device
If a company sought to design a secret spy device, they could do a better job than Glass! Let’s be honest: if someone wants to secretly record you, there are much, much better cameras out there than one you wear conspicuously on your face and that lights up every time you give a voice command, or press a button. 

Myth 8 - Glass is only for those privileged enough to afford it
The current prototype costs $1500 and we realize that is out of the range of many people. But that doesn’t mean the people who have it are wealthy and entitled. In some cases, their work has paid for it. Others have raised money on Kickstarter and Indiegogo. And for some, it’s been a gift. 

Myth 9 - Glass is banned... EVERYWHERE  
Since cell phones came onto the scene, folks have been pretty good at creating etiquette and the requisite (and often necessary) bans around where someone can record (locker rooms, casino floors, etc.). Since Glass functionality mirrors the cell phones ("down to the screen being off by default), the same rules apply. Just bear in mind, would-be banners: Glass can be attached to prescription lenses, so requiring Glass to be turned off is probably a lot safer than insisting people stumble about blindly in a locker room.

Myth 10 - Glass marks the end of privacy
When cameras first hit the consumer market in the late 19th century, people declared an end to privacy. Cameras were banned in parks, at national monuments and on beaches.  People feared the same when the first cell phone cameras came out. Today, there are more cameras than ever before. In ten years there will be even more cameras, with or without Glass. 150+ years of cameras and eight years of YouTube are a good indicator of the kinds of photos and videos people capture--from our favorite cat videos to dramatic, perspective-changing looks at environmental destruction, government crackdowns, and everyday human miracles. 
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Derek Hohls

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Now this is my kind of mission control room!
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Space... where exactly was the frontier?
 
Space is big. It's so incredibly big, and so empty, that it can be hard for any of us -- even scientists -- to really emotionally grasp it. This site shows us one of those things that we almost never see, and for good reason: a scale drawing of the Solar System, with the Moon being one pixel across. Scale drawings you normally see will either show the planets to scale, or the distances between them to scale, but not both; if you show them both to the same scale, well... you're going to have a long way to scroll. Worth makes the time pass with little remarks and thoughts on the way.

The way to Pluto, that is. This map doesn't show any of the trans-Plutonian dwarves; you would have to scroll for a long, long time to get to them. (See http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2013/07/15/you-havent-so-much-lost-a-planet-as-gained-five-dwarves/ for why)

So as you move off into the interplanetary void, just remember:

Space is big
Space is dark
It's hard to find
A place to park.
Burma Shave
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Derek Hohls

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It's coming back...
In the 1980s, NASA engineer Robert Farquhar came up with a sly plan to divert the ISEE-3 satellite from its original path to visit a comet instead. Now Farquhar has another big plan for his "baby."
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Interesting read... and the future, as always, shifts into patterns we cannot predict by simply straight-lining from the past!
How a 19-year-old hacker behind Oculus Rift set out to invent a gaming headset but ended up reviving a dead technology and building a global communications platform, worth $2 billion to Facebook in a surprise deal announced this week
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Moving fast these days...
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Docker gains ground in the enterprise world ....

The Red Hat Container Certification ensures that application containers built using Red Hat Enterprise Linux will operate seamlessly across certified container hosts. The pending release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 will be certified container hosts, with Docker as a primary supported container format.
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Derek Hohls

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People
In his circles
152 people
Have him in circles
703 people
Ian Jamieson's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Software Developer
Skills
python, django, html, databases, gis, proof-reading, listening, designing
Employment
  • CSIR
    Programmer, 1991 - present
  • DWA
    Engineer, 1987 - 1990
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
husband, father, christian, programmer, reader, boardgamer... and person-under-construction
Introduction
Yes, this is the correct Derek!
Education
  • University of KwaZulu-Natal
    Bsc Chem Eng, 1981 - 1986
  • Durban High School
    1976 - 1980
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