Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Dental at Joondalup
9 followers
9 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
Dental at Joondalup is proudly sponsoring Rottofest 2015. Check out the link for more information on the comedy, music and entertainment that will be provided or visit their website directly: http://www.rottofest.com.au/
Proudly sponsoring Rottofest 2015
Proudly sponsoring Rottofest 2015
dentalatjoondalup.com.au
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Looking for a custom mouth guard? Even if you aren't, this article may make you think twice about buying a cheap one. Give us a call and we'll be happy to talk to you about your options.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
We recently discussed anxiety in dentistry and the options to provide anxiety relief in the dental clinic. In this article, we’ll describe the methods in greater detail and discuss which types of procedures would be suitable for the form of sedation available.

The most common medications we use for light sedation are Diazepam (Valium) and Penthrox (Methoxyflurane). Valium falls under the medication class of “benzodiazepines” and has been used safely for over 50 years...
Dental Sedation Methods in Depth
Dental Sedation Methods in Depth
dentalatjoondalup.com.au
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Free dental check-ups for 18-30 year olds - best taken up if you like energy drinks!
Originally shared by ****
And here is our  #freshmouthfeeling  video, version 2, with new fun facts the whole family can enjoy :)
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Free check-ups for 18-30 year olds in July. Places limited, hurry!
Originally shared by ****
Who wants that #freshmouthfeeling ? A lot of people, it seems!
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Anxious about seeing the dentist? Here is what we can do about calming your nerves (including sedation techniques).
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
We now take online bookings! Yes, you can book a dentist appointment here with us in Joondalup. The internet and technology are marvellous and we're finding that more and more people are using this option. Check out are available appointments to find what suits you:
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
We all know someone with that story... they were playing their usual sport as they had done for years. Suddenly, a misplaced elbow to the face and a tooth suddenly gets knocked out. Then, there's the panicked confusion about what to do next. Do we store the tooth in saliva or milk or water before rushing madly to the dentist to put it back in? ...
Should I get a mouth guard?
Should I get a mouth guard?
dentalatjoondalup.com.au
Add a comment...

How much sugar can you have before your teeth are affected?

We are often asked about sugar and its effect on teeth (especially after all the chocolate you’ve probably eaten over Easter) so we thought that providing a summary might be helpful!

How sugar leads to tooth decay

Sugar itself actually isn’t bad for teeth - rather, sugar combined with saliva feeds bacteria that cause tooth decay. In an ideal world, we wouldn’t have this specific bacteria in our mouths and could thus eat all the sugar we wanted! Unfortunately, this is not the case. The presence of sugar (especially sucrose) in the mouth with a combination of bacteria results in the production of acids which break down tooth structure (enamel & dentine).
As we explained last month, plaque can usually be removed through correct brushing and flossing technique. Accumulated plaque leads to calculus, which forms a perfect home for more bacteria, meaning that a scale and clean is needed. This happens for pretty much everyone - even dentists!

Are all sugars equally bad?

In short, no. As a general rule, all sugars are bad for your teeth and some are even worse. Sticky, sugar-filled substances, such as toffee or caramel, stick to your teeth and are therefore present in your mouth for longer, promoting the growth of even more bacteria. The presence of acid (such as in soft drinks) increases the rate at which decay occurs, therefore making it one of the worst options for a sugar fix.

We also receive questions about honey, which occurs naturally, and is therefore believed by some to be safe for teeth. Unfortunately, honey is made of glucose and fructose, which are both sugars. Therefore, honey leads to tooth decay too.

How much sugar is too much?

The interesting point many people we talk to learn is that it is not necessarily the quantity of consumed sugar that leads to more tooth decay, but more so the frequency of sugar intake. As an example, if you had a packet of ten sugary biscuits, it would be better (for your teeth) to consume them all in one sitting (one “sugar hit”) rather than eating them separately, spaced out over time (ten separate sugar hits). At this point, it would be advisable to consider how often you consume sugar throughout a normal day. Do you have jam on your toast? Sugar in your coffee? A sweet treat for morning or afternoon tea? A sugary drink with lunch or dinner?

What frequency is too much, then? Current guidelines are that eating sugar ten times or more per week takes you out of the “low risk” category. That’s right - only 10 per week. Any more and you are no longer at low risk.

We know you’re human

Let’s face it - sugar is hard to avoid and living a sugar-free life is almost impossible. The best way to avoid pain and extensive dental treatment is to make your diet work a bit better with respect to sugar and to get your regular scale and clean (usually every six months).

If it’s been over six months since you’ve seen us, you’re overdue! Just like servicing your car, regular maintenance of your teeth prevents serious and expensive surprises down the track. Call us now on 08 9301 4088 to book an appointment.
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded