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Dennis Smith
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"A Mind is a Beautiful Thing to Make Great! (TM)"
"A Mind is a Beautiful Thing to Make Great! (TM)"

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Here's the last--and my favorite. Happy Momma's Day, everybody!

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Here's the last--and my favorite! Happy Mother's Day, everyone!

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One for four I want to share on this Mother's Day. Remember, behind every successful man is a momma ready to whup that behind! :D
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Once again, a "Hoppy" Easter to all!

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And a happy St. Patrick's Day to you all!
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Happy #piday  !

You might remember pi (π) as that funny little symbol from math class. It’s the ratio between the circumference of a circle and its diameter,  and it’s been known since the ancient Greeks—π is their letter for “p.” (not to be confused with the Greek letter “rho,” which looks like a P but is their letter for “R.”)

I asked my buddy Tony for some fun facts about π, and he said that for starters it’s kind of a magic number, one of a few numbers mathematicians (math scientists) call “irrational.” Irrational numbers are called that not because they don’t make sense, but because they can’t be written as a fraction between whole numbers, as can “rational” numbers.

It’s also a number they call “transcendental,” which is something even Tony doesn’t fully understand, but Wikipedia says means a number that is “not the root of any non-zero polynomial having rational coefficients.” It does explain why the ancient challenge of “squaring the circle”—constructing a square with the same area as a given circle, using only a compass and straightedge—is impossible. You can’t be exact enough.

Tony could explain what “irrational” numbers were, though. As an example, the whole numbers we count with can be expressed as fractions like so:

1 = 1/1
2 = 2/1
3 = 3/1
10 = 10/1

…and so on. Any number we can write as a fraction is rational, even if the fraction part (right of the decimal point) goes on forever:

1/2 = 0.500
1/4 = 0.250
1/8 = 0.1250
1/3 = 0.3333333333333333…
1/7 = 0.142857142857142…
1/9 = 0.1111111111111111

Tony explained you know you have a rational number if the numbers to the right of the decimal point either go to zero or start repeating themselves, the way 1/3 becomes repeating 3s, 1/9 becomes repeating 1s or 1/7 becomes repeating “142857”s.

But π, despite coming from one number (a circle’s circumference) divided by another (a circle’s diameter) doesn't repeat. In fact, π has been calculated out to over 12 trillion digits—a level of precision, he adds, no one uses—and no repeating pattern has emerged. Pi simply cannot be written out as a whole number fraction.

Lastly, π is not the only irrational number. The square root of two (√2) is an irrational number. (1.41421….) There’s also the natural logarithm e. (2.71828…), to name two others in common use. Artists may have heard of the “golden ratio.” That comes from another irrational, phi (1.61803…) .

Anyway, enough explaining. I’m going out to celebrate Pi Day. I think I’ll start with a piece of pi…er, pie.

Peace,

Dennis
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LOL! Happy #piday2015  
Leave it to Einstein to be born on the best PI day ever. Always stay curious. Happy birthday, Albert Einstein.
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