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Denise Cummins
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Denise Cummins

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"The answer isn't low self-esteem. It is something more subtle, strategic, and ... powerful."
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Denise Cummins

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"1. Men do not outnumber women in all STEM fields
2. Women and men are equally capable of doing STEM work
3. Sex-linked interest preferences are not mere artifacts of socialization
4. Different preferences don’t mean women’s are less important
5. Men earn more because they believe they are worth more—and women agree"

"Women are clearly capable of doing well in STEM fields traditionally dominated by men, and they should not be hindered, bullied, or shamed for pursuing careers in such fields. But we also should not be ashamed if our interests differ from men’s. If we find certain careers more intrinsically rewarding than men do, that does not mean we have been brainwashed by society or herded into menial fields of labor. Instead, we should demand that greater intrinsic and monetary compensation be awarded to the work we like and want to do."

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/making-sense/truth-women-stem-careers/
Women are capable of doing well in STEM fields traditionally dominated by men, and they should not be hindered from pursuing careers in such fields. But women, argues psychologist Denise Cummins, also should not be ashamed if their interests differ from men’s.
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Denise Cummins

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There are so many things wrong with this essay that I'm not even sure where to start.

First, According to a report from the College Board, public colleges and universities received about $9,000 per student in state funding in 2007 (in 2012 dollars). By 2012, state funding had dropped to about $6,500 per student, roughly a 27 percent decline. Meanwhile, enrollment in public institutions increased by 11 percent over these same five years.

Second, to address the deficit in state funding, administrators sought to increase income and cut costs. One avenue to increase income was to raise tuitions, which they did, but not so much as to put public higher education out of reach of the middle class: inflation-adjusted average tuition, fees, room and board costs increased 20 percent from about $15,000 in 2007 to roughly $18,000 in 2012. In 2007, student tuition covered about 36 percent of the actual costs involved in running a university. By 2012, that had increased to over 47 percent.

Third, according to a report released by the Delta Cost Project, a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that analyzes college finances, new administrative positions drove a 28 percent expansion of the higher-education workforce from 2000 to 2012, while the average number of tenure faculty and staff per administrator tenure faculty declined by 40 percent between 1990 and 2012. There are now only 2.5 or fewer faculty and staff per administrator.

Professor Campos needs to check his facts.
It’s not because states have cut funding for higher education.
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Denise Cummins

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A recent study discovered two factors that characterize resilient people.
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Denise Cummins

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I did an interview with BYU Radio yesterday about making friends as we age. Art Markman was interviewed earlier in the show.  

http://www.byuradio.org/episode/ca742f1c-ad2c-487f-9259-1ff3e250baf6?playhead=6283&autoplay=true
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Denise Cummins

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What this "news" article lacks is any evidence that dissection has anything to do with science. It doesn't. If it did, then every butcher would be considered a scientist.

Dissection is just a "hands-on" activity to entertain children. Whether they actually learn any biology is debatable. What they do learn is that animal life is cheap and cutting up animals for entertainment makes them scientists.

According to the National Science Education Standards (link is external)(NSES) and the Benchmarks for Science Literacy (link is external),the major ideas that students must learn in biology are cells, heredity, matter and energy flow, behavior of organisms, interdependence of life, and the evolution of life. It is difficult to see how any of these are learned from watching or performing dissections.

Of six studies that actually compared test performance outcomes, four found no difference between real and virtual dissections, and one reported that the alternative group scored higher. But contrary to teachers' beliefs, no differences in interest in science were found.

My daughter refused to do a dissection in middle school, and students who had done the dissection scoffed at her, claiming, "Frogs don't have nervous systems, so it doesn't matter what you do to them." Let me repeat: This is what students who HAD done dissections told her. She did a virtual dissection and knew otherwise.
In science classrooms across the country, middle-schoolers will take part in an iconic activity this year: frog dissection.
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Denise Cummins

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American's obsession with beef has led to this atrocity.

"What the BLM has done essentially is turned the law on its head, and instead of a wildlife protection statute they enforce it as though it were a pest control statute."

"Wild horses are only present on 10 percent of that land. There are under 4,000 horses on two million acres of land. That’s one horse per 500 acres. There’s no horse overpopulation problem. We have a cattle and sheep overpopulation on our public lands.”
Utah suit wants to eliminate 1,350 horses from public land with the same practices that are killing horses in Wyoming.
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Women are capable of doing well in STEM fields traditionally dominated by men, and they should not be hindered from pursuing careers in such fields. But women, argues psychologist Denise Cummins, also should not be ashamed if their interests differ from men’s.
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"Foster plays Liza Miller, a 40-year-old divorcee who is looking to re-enter the workforce after taking time off to raise a kid, and who quickly realizes the best way to get hired as an entry-level publisher's assistant is to pretend to be 26 years old."

Glad to see this. I've been writing about this issue, and it looks like it is really starting to enter into public awareness: People who take time off to raise children should not be automatically written off as "out of touch" and "unemployable".

Don't count out middle aged women because that is PRECISELY when women tend to hit their stride.

The same theme arose in a) Modern Family when Claire tries to re-enter the workforce, and is successful only because she goes to work in her father's business where she is does remarkably well, and b) The Good Wife where Alicia can re-enter the workplace as an attorney only because a former law school friend twists some arms at his law office. She goes on to not only become partner, but Illinois State's Attorney. So it looks like this idea is germinating on TV and social media: When people take time off to raise children, they are not "wasting time" nor are they necessarily "falling behind" those who stay in the workforce.
The premise of Sutton Foster's new TV Land sitcom reflects a depressing truth about Hollywood casting: It's not friendly to middle-aged women.
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"His devotion to reasoning and logic is what put me on my future path to becoming a reasoning and decision-making researcher...So this scientist says in all humility, "Thank you, Leonard Nimoy, for bringing this beloved character to life. I am glad you lived long and prospered."
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Denise Cummins

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"Imitation is a powerful form of learning that comes on-line early in development and shapes who we become."
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Denise Cummins

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The phenomenal success of Fifty Shades of Grey offers a glimpse into the dark side of the feminine psyche
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Public - 6 months ago
reviewed 6 months ago
The food is nothing short of terrific! The chef used to cook for Bombay Indian Grill, so if you liked the food there, you will definitely like it here. The ambiance is a bit like a deli or diner, but no matter: The food is wonderful, served hot and sizzling, with a riot of flavors and colors! The service is quick and the servers polite.
Public - 10 months ago
reviewed 10 months ago
2 reviews
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